5

After executing this code:

const filename = "../../.dburl"
const url = fs.readFileSync(filename, 'utf-8')

I recieve the following error:

Error: ENOENT: no such file or directory, open '../../.dburl'

What I know so far:

1) The filepath is correct.

2) My application has permission to read the file.

3) .dburl is not read even when stored in the same directory as the application.

Any help is much appreciated ... Thanks!

  • 1
    Are you sure the path to .dburl is relative to where you're running your script from? The current working directory the path is relative to is not the location of the script making the readFileSync call. – SimpleJ Jan 11 '17 at 23:00
5

You can use the module-level variable '__dirname' to get the directory that contains the current script. Then you can use path.resolve to use relative paths.

console.log('Path of file in parent dir:', require('path').resolve(__dirname, '../app.js'));
1

I'm guessing you're confusing the current working directory of your script for the location of your script. It's hard to say without knowing the structure of your project and where you're calling the script from.

Assuming your shell's working directory is /, .dburl is at /.dburl and your script is located at /foo/bar/script.js. If you run node foo/bar/script, you could read .dburl with readFileSync('./dburl'). However if you run cd foo/bar; node ./script, you would need to read .dburl with readFileSync('../../.dburl').

This is because the working directory of your script is equal to the working directory of the shell you launched it in.

  • So relative filepaths are relative to the working directory of the shell and not to the location of the script? – srpalo Jan 11 '17 at 23:17
  • Atleast in the context of node? – srpalo Jan 11 '17 at 23:18
  • @srpalo Yes. Try adding console.log(process.cwd()) to your script and it will print the directory all of your fs paths are relative to. require calls are relative to the script's path though. – SimpleJ Jan 11 '17 at 23:20
  • The output of process.cwd() is the filepath of where the script is located. If that's true, then shouldn't ../../.dburl be correct since I created it relative to the scripts location? – srpalo Jan 11 '17 at 23:27
  • Before running your script, run ls ../../.dburl. If it says "No such file or directory", your script won't be able to find it. – SimpleJ Jan 11 '17 at 23:32
1

READING FILE ON SAME LEVEL

enter image description here

 //the server object listens on port 8080
    const PORT = 8080;
    var http = require("http");
    var fs = require("fs");
    var path = require("path");

    //create a server object:
    http
      .createServer((req, res) => {
        console.log("READING FILE: ", path.resolve(__dirname, "input.txt"));

        fs.readFile(path.resolve(__dirname, "input.txt"), (err, data) => {
          //error handling
          if (err) return console.error(err);

          //return file content
          console.log("FILE CONTENT: " + data.toString());
          res.write(data.toString());
          res.end();
          console.log("READ COMPLETED");
        });
      })
      .listen(PORT);

READING FILE ON OTHER LEVEL:

enter image description here

//the server object listens on port 8080
const PORT = 8080;
var http = require("http");
var fs = require("fs");
var path = require("path");

//create a server object:
http
  .createServer((req, res) => {
    console.log("READING FILE: ", path.resolve(__dirname, "./mock/input.txt"));

    fs.readFile(path.resolve(__dirname, "./mock/input.txt"), (err, data) => {
      //error handling
      if (err) return console.error(err);

      //return file content
      console.log("FILE CONTENT: " + data.toString());
      res.write(data.toString());
      res.end();
      console.log("READ COMPLETED");
    });
  })
  .listen(PORT);

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