82

This is what I keep getting:

[root@centos-master ~]# kubectl get pods
NAME               READY     STATUS             RESTARTS   AGE
nfs-server-h6nw8   1/1       Running            0          1h
nfs-web-07rxz      0/1       CrashLoopBackOff   8          16m
nfs-web-fdr9h      0/1       CrashLoopBackOff   8          16m

Below is output from "describe pods" kubectl describe pods

Events:
  FirstSeen LastSeen    Count   From                SubobjectPath       Type        Reason      Message
  --------- --------    -----   ----                -------------       --------    ------      -------
  16m       16m     1   {default-scheduler }                    Normal      Scheduled   Successfully assigned nfs-web-fdr9h to centos-minion-2
  16m       16m     1   {kubelet centos-minion-2}   spec.containers{web}    Normal      Created     Created container with docker id 495fcbb06836
  16m       16m     1   {kubelet centos-minion-2}   spec.containers{web}    Normal      Started     Started container with docker id 495fcbb06836
  16m       16m     1   {kubelet centos-minion-2}   spec.containers{web}    Normal      Started     Started container with docker id d56f34ae4e8f
  16m       16m     1   {kubelet centos-minion-2}   spec.containers{web}    Normal      Created     Created container with docker id d56f34ae4e8f
  16m       16m     2   {kubelet centos-minion-2}               Warning     FailedSync  Error syncing pod, skipping: failed to "StartContainer" for "web" with CrashLoopBackOff: "Back-off 10s restarting failed container=web pod=nfs-web-fdr9h_default(461c937d-d870-11e6-98de-005056040cc2)"

I have two pods: nfs-web-07rxz, nfs-web-fdr9h, but if I do "kubectl logs nfs-web-07rxz" or with "-p" option I don't see any log in both pods.

[root@centos-master ~]# kubectl logs nfs-web-07rxz -p
[root@centos-master ~]# kubectl logs nfs-web-07rxz

This is my replicationController yaml file: replicationController yaml file

apiVersion: v1 kind: ReplicationController metadata:   name: nfs-web spec:   replicas: 2   selector:
    role: web-frontend   template:
    metadata:
      labels:
        role: web-frontend
    spec:
      containers:
      - name: web
        image: eso-cmbu-docker.artifactory.eng.vmware.com/demo-container:demo-version3.0
        ports:
          - name: web
            containerPort: 80
        securityContext:
          privileged: true

My Docker image was made from this simple docker file:

FROM ubuntu
RUN apt-get update
RUN apt-get install -y nginx
RUN apt-get install -y nfs-common

I am running my kubernetes cluster on CentOs-1611, kube version:

[root@centos-master ~]# kubectl version
Client Version: version.Info{Major:"1", Minor:"3", GitVersion:"v1.3.0", GitCommit:"86dc49aa137175378ac7fba7751c3d3e7f18e5fc", GitTreeState:"clean", BuildDate:"2016-12-15T16:57:18Z", GoVersion:"go1.6.3", Compiler:"gc", Platform:"linux/amd64"}
Server Version: version.Info{Major:"1", Minor:"3", GitVersion:"v1.3.0", GitCommit:"86dc49aa137175378ac7fba7751c3d3e7f18e5fc", GitTreeState:"clean", BuildDate:"2016-12-15T16:57:18Z", GoVersion:"go1.6.3", Compiler:"gc", Platform:"linux/amd64"}

If I run the docker image by "docker run" I was able to run the image without any issue, only through kubernetes I got the crash.

Can someone help me out, how can I debug without seeing any log?

  • Can you try adding a command to the pod yaml? – Sukumar Jan 12 '17 at 19:29
  • check the logs with kubectl logs -f <pod_name> it could be the (server/ container) startup issue. – Vishrant May 3 '19 at 18:42
  • You could also run kubectl get events to see what is causing the crush loop. – Margach Chris Oct 28 '19 at 13:26

10 Answers 10

65

As @Sukumar commented, you need to have your Dockerfile have a Command to run or have your ReplicationController specify a command.

The pod is crashing because it starts up then immediately exits, thus Kubernetes restarts and the cycle continues.

| improve this answer | |
  • If we have proper Dockerfile added and still getting the error , what may be the reason ? I am getting the same error evenif I properly added the Command. And When I am testing the independant docker image without using kubernetes deployment , then I am getting the output. So it is not problem with Dockerfile. Its something related with deployment ?. Here I added the whole issue that I am facing , stackoverflow.com/questions/56001352/… . Can you please look on that? – Jacob May 8 '19 at 13:14
  • There is a really good blog that goes in depth on what a CrashLoopBackoff means and the various cases where this can happen: managedkube.com/kubernetes/pod/failure/crashloopbackoff/k8sbot/… – gar Feb 7 at 16:12
40
kubectl -n <namespace-name> describe pod <pod name>

kubectl -n <namespace-name> logs -p  <pod name> 
| improve this answer | |
  • 39
    Although this commands might (or might not solve) the problem, a good answer should always contain an explanation how the problem is solved. – BDL Jun 4 '18 at 13:57
  • The first command kubectl -n <namespace-name> describe pod <pod name> is to describe your pod, which can be used to see any error in pod creation and running the pod like lack of resource, etc. And the second command kubectl -n <namespace-name> logs -p <pod name> to see the logs of the application running in the pod. – iamabhishek May 20 at 5:54
10

I had the need to keep a pod running for subsequent kubectl exec calls and as the comments above pointed out my pod was getting killed by my k8s cluster because it had completed running all its tasks. I managed to keep my pod running by simply kicking the pod with a command that would not stop automatically as in:

kubectl run YOUR_POD_NAME -n YOUR_NAMESPACE --image SOME_PUBLIC_IMAGE:latest --command tailf /dev/null
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    tailf did not work for me but this did (on Alpine linux): --command /usr/bin/tail -- -f /dev/null – Jakub Holý Jan 15 '19 at 13:35
  • 1
    it's not pod name. it's deployment name.kubectl run <deployment name> -n <namespace> --image <image> --command tailf /dev/null – Gabriel Wu Mar 22 '19 at 0:53
7

From This page, the container dies after running everything correctly but crashes because all the commands ended. Either you make your services run on the foreground, or you create a keep alive script. By doing so, Kubernetes will show that your application is running. We have to note that in the Docker environment, this problem is not encountered. It is only Kubernetes that wants a running app.

Update (an example):

Here's how to avoid CrashLoopBackOff, when launching a Netshoot container:

kubectl run netshoot --image nicolaka/netshoot -- sleep infinity
| improve this answer | |
4

My pod kept crashing and I was unable to find the cause. Luckily there is a space where kubernetes saves all the events that occurred before my pod crashed.
(#List Events sorted by timestamp)

To see these events run the command:

kubectl get events --sort-by=.metadata.creationTimestamp

make sure to add a --namespace mynamespace argument to the command if needed

The events shown in the output of the command showed my why my pod kept crashing.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks! This tip helped me detect there was a problem mounting the volume with secret. – Leif John Jan 15 at 14:23
3

If you have an application that takes slower to bootstrap, it could be related to the initial values of the readiness/liveness probes. I solved my problem by increasing the value of initialDelaySeconds to 120s as my SpringBoot application deals with a lot of initialization. The documentation does not mention the default 0 (https://kubernetes.io/docs/api-reference/v1.9/#probe-v1-core)

service:
  livenessProbe:
    httpGet:
      path: /health/local
      scheme: HTTP
      port: 8888
    initialDelaySeconds: 120
    periodSeconds: 5
    timeoutSeconds: 5
    failureThreshold: 10
  readinessProbe:
    httpGet:
      path: /admin/health
      scheme: HTTP
      port: 8642
    initialDelaySeconds: 150
    periodSeconds: 5
    timeoutSeconds: 5
    failureThreshold: 10

A very good explanation about those values is given by What is the default value of initialDelaySeconds.

The health or readiness check algorithm works like:

  1. wait for initialDelaySeconds
  2. perform check and wait timeoutSeconds for a timeout if the number of continued successes is greater than successThreshold return success
  3. if the number of continued failures is greater than failureThreshold return failure otherwise wait periodSeconds and start a new check

In my case, my application can now bootstrap in a very clear way, so that I know I will not get periodic crashloopbackoff because sometimes it would be on the limit of those rates.

| improve this answer | |
0

In my case the problem was what Steve S. mentioned:

The pod is crashing because it starts up then immediately exits, thus Kubernetes restarts and the cycle continues.

Namely I had a Java application whose main threw an exception (and something overrode the default uncaught exception handler so that nothing was logged). The solution was to put the body of main into try { ... } catch and print out the exception. Thus I could find out what was wrong and fix it.

(Another cause could be something in the app calling System.exit; you could use a custom SecurityManager with an overridden checkExit to prevent (or log the caller of) exit; see https://stackoverflow.com/a/5401319/204205.)

| improve this answer | |
0

Whilst troubleshooting the same issue I found no logs when using kubeclt logs <pod_id>. Therefore I ssh:ed in to the node instance to try to run the container using plain docker. To my surprise this failed also.

When entering the container with:

docker exec -it faulty:latest /bin/sh

and poking around I found that it wasn't the latest version.

A faulty version of the docker image was already available on the instance.

When I removed the faulty:latest instance with:

docker rmi faulty:latest

everything started to work.

| improve this answer | |
0

I solved this problem I increased memory resource

  resources:
          limits:
            cpu: 1
            memory: 1Gi
          requests:
            cpu: 100m
        memory: 250Mi 
| improve this answer | |
0

In your yaml file, add command and args lines:

...
containers:
      - name: api
        image: localhost:5000/image-name 
        command: [ "sleep" ]
        args: [ "infinity" ]
...

Works for me.

| improve this answer | |
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