5

I was using Python 2.7.12 (default, Nov 19 2016, 06:48:10) [GCC 5.4.0 20160609] on linux2 , when i ran the folllowing code in it the corresponding error is shown .I searched a lot about this but am unable to find why is it so

>>> bob=dict(name='bob smith',age=42,pay='10000',job='dev')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'dict' object is not callable
  • 10
    Have you named a variable dict somewhere? – mgilson Jan 12 '17 at 5:13
20

In a fresh interpreter:

>>> bob=dict(name='bob smith',age=42,pay='10000',job='dev')
>>> bob
{'age': 42, 'pay': '10000', 'job': 'dev', 'name': 'bob smith'}

However, you are getting a TypeError:

TypeError: 'dict' object is not callable

This error you get tells you that your dict is not callable.

Since my dict is callable when I open a fresh interpreter, it means that your dict is different.

Most likely, you defined a dict variable, which overrode the built-in dict. Look for the

dict = {...}

line, and rename your variable.

As pointed out by @Robᵩ, don't use built-in names for your variables. Especially avoid the tempting str, list, and so on.

  • 2
    Yes the problem was with the variable name dict , when i deleted the previously defined dict and then used it again the code works perfectly fine – Somebody Jan 12 '17 at 6:09
7

On a previous line in that interactive session, you have rebound the dict name to some variable. Perhaps you have a line like dict={1:2} or dict=dict(one=1, two=2).

Here is one such session:

>>> dict=dict(one=1)
>>> bob=dict(name='bob smith',age=42,pay='10000',job='dev')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'dict' object is not callable
>>> 

As a general rule, one should not use built-in type names as variable names, to prevent this error.

0

edit: Ignore this, I am told this is bad practice.

As mgilson stated, the issue is likely that you have a variable called dict. The solution to this would be to run

del dict

which deletes the variable by that name.

  • @Rightleg, Thanks for pointing that out. Added a disclaimer saying I am wrong. – Peter Gottesman Jan 12 '17 at 5:27

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