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Sorry, I have just started machine learning and am not by any means an expert in it. So, most likely this question will sound ignorant which I am afraid that I cannot avoid. Also, I searched to the best of my ability and was incapable of finding similar questions or answers that may address my question.

I learned that a model cannot learn if it was not from a dataset that has a normal distribution. Also, the only way I use to find out that a data set is normally distributed is the graphical method described here for each parameter. Which may be unadvisable, and if so I am always subject to change, so please correct me if that is the case.

To get to my question, if I see a normal distribution for certain parameters yet not for a few others, does that mean the dataset is flawed? Or does it mean that I should not use those parameters for the model?

Thanks in advance, and sorry if there are any fundamental errors in my understanding of the concepts.

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  • I learned that a model cannot learn if it was not from a dataset that has a normal distribution. -> that depends on the model. if I see a normal distribution for certain parameters yet not for a few others, does that mean the dataset is flawed? -> no it means that THAT specific model is not the right one for your data. You may have to find a different one. – cel Jan 12 '17 at 9:53
  • Thank you cel, I think I understood the concept of model selection a bit better thanks to you. – Isamu Isozaki Jan 15 '17 at 7:26
  • +cel May I ask whether the AdaBoost Regressor can be valid for the kind of distribution described in the question? Also, if there are none, it is fine but is there a list of the models that I can use for such cases? Or a rule of thumb to decipher if a model is valid for the situation above? – Isamu Isozaki Jan 15 '17 at 7:35
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As cel said, every model has its own assumptions and limitations. While there might be a model that can only learn on completely normally distributed data - there are plenty of models which don't, such as SVMs or Random Forests.

In practice if you know that your data does not conform to the assumptions of your model you could consider using a different model or to manipulate your data to fit your assumption. The latter option is something that you should consider carefully to make sure your manipulation does not render your model useless when used in real-life scenarios.

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  • Thank you dear sir, or ma'am – Isamu Isozaki Jan 15 '17 at 7:23
  • I asked cel this as well. Yet, may I ask whether the AdaBoost Regressor can be valid for the kind of distribution described in the question? Also, if there are none, it is fine but is there a list of the models that I can use for such cases? Or a rule of thumb to decipher if a model is valid for the situation above? – Isamu Isozaki Jan 15 '17 at 7:36
  • @Bob - Are you asking for a regression model that can handle a dataset where there are parameters which are not normally distributed? Most common regression models would be able to work with such a data set. Regarding Adaboost: it is a meta-regressor and only its base estimator is relevant to your concern. – ginge Jan 15 '17 at 9:42
  • Thanks for the reply, and yes, that was my question. Also sorry, I forgot to include the base estimator in my question. It is the Decision Tree Regressor. Yet I assume that it would be able to work with the dataset as I suspect that there is no sudden change of requirement for that regressor. If I am wrong I will be grateful for a correction. – Isamu Isozaki Jan 17 '17 at 7:47
  • There's nothing inherent in the Decision Tree Regressor that should harm your performance because of non-normal data. – ginge Jan 17 '17 at 9:23

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