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In C#, if a List() object is not null, does that also mean that the Count will always be greater than 0?

For example, if you have an object intList of type List<int>, is the following code redundant?

if (intList != null && intList.Count > 0) {
    // do something
}
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  • 6
    new List<int>().Count // => 0 – Tim Schmelter Jan 12 '17 at 15:42
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    What sort of person downvotes useful questions? Why bother? – 3-14159265358979323846264 Jan 12 '17 at 15:49
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    @3-14159265358979323846264 what on Earth makes this a useful question? Downvoting useless questions is half of how we prevent them from competing with good questions. – canon Jan 12 '17 at 15:50
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    Gosh I don't know. Oh no I do ... it's the fact that null != a count of 0, but to someone who's new they might seem like the same thing. You must have been at the 681 reputation point in the past. Maybe you've forgotten what newbie questions look like. – 3-14159265358979323846264 Jan 12 '17 at 15:53
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    Let's rewrite that question: "Does having a bag also mean that it has items in it?" It's nonsense. – canon Jan 12 '17 at 15:55
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No, it is perfectly valid to have an empty list:

List<int> intList = new List<int>();
bool isEmpty = intList.Count == 0; // true

If you want to know if a list is not null and contains at least one item you could also use the new C#6 null conditional operator:

List<int> intList = null;
bool isNotEmpty = intList?.Count > 0; // no exception, false
1
  • Thanks Tim! That answers it perfectly. And thank you for the tip about the null condition operator. – Daniel Congrove Jan 12 '17 at 16:06
1

No, that code is not redundant. intList can be null or intList.Count == 0. Here are some cases:

List<int> intList = null;

Console.WriteLine(intList);  // it will print 'null'

intList = new List<int>();

Console.WriteLine(intList.Count); // it will print '0'

In modern C# you can use the Null-conditional operator to simplify the check though. This syntax is equivalent in performance to testing for null, it's just a syntax sugar to simplify this common check.

if (intList?.Count > 0) {
    // do something
}
1

All the above answers are self explained. Just try to add a bit more

if (intList != null && intList.Count > 0) Here the count is checked to make sure the intList has at least one item in it before performing any operation on the list. The most common use case we check for count in addition for null check is when we want to iterate thru the items of the list.

if (intList != null && intList.Count > 0) 
{
    foreach(var item in intList)
    {
        //Do something with item.
    }
}

If list is empty then there is no point trying iterating thru it.

But if intList is NOT null that does NOT mean that it has count > 0. Items need to be added in to the list if count has to be greater than zero.

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