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I was fiddling around making infinite loops to test some other code/my understanding, and came across this strange behaviour. In the program below, counting from 0 to 2^24 takes <100ms on my machine, but counting to 2^25 takes orders of magnitude more time (at time of writing, it's still executing).

Why is this the case?

This was under Java 1.8.0_101, on a 64-bit copy of Windows 10.

TestClass.java

public class TestClass {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        addFloats((float) Math.pow(2.0, 24.0));
        addFloats((float) Math.pow(2.0, 25.0));
    }

    private static void addFloats(float number) {
        float f = 0.0f;
        long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

        while(true) {
            f += 1.0f;
            if (f >= number) {
                System.out.println(f);
                System.out.println(number + " took " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime) + " msecs");
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}
  • have you tried just running addFloats((float) Math.pow(2.0, 25.0));? – RAZ_Muh_Taz Jan 12 '17 at 16:57
  • 5
    Because at some moment f+1.0 == f. – Oleg Estekhin Jan 12 '17 at 16:57
  • @OlegEstekhin Ahh, that'll be it. I'm an idiot. Thanks! – Murray Jan 12 '17 at 16:59
  • Why is your parameter a Float? Boxing isn't needed here and it will be unboxed every comparison (unless that's optimized somehow) – Moira Jan 12 '17 at 16:59
  • 2
16

This is because floats have a minimum precision that can be represented, which decreased as the float's value becomes larger. Somewhere between 2^24 and 2^25, adding one is no longer enough to change the value to the next largest representable number. At that point, every time through the loop, f just keeps the same value, since f += 1.0f no longer changes it.

If you change your loop to this:

while(true) {
    float newF = f + 1.0f;
    if(newF == f) System.out.println(newF);
    f += 1.0f;
    if (f >= number) {
        System.out.println(f);
        System.out.println(number + " took " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime) + " msecs");
        break;
    }
}

You can see this happening. It seems as though it stops increasing as soon as f reaches 2^24.

The output of the above code will be an endless number of "1.6777216E7" if you run it with 2^25.

You can test this value by using the Math.nextAfter function, which tells you the next representable value. If you try running this code:

float value = (float)Math.pow(2.0, 24.0);
System.out.println(Math.nextAfter(value, Float.MAX_VALUE) - value);

you can see that the next representable value after 2^24 is 2^24 + 2.

For an excellent breakdown of why this happens, and why it starts mattering where it does, see this answer

  • 5
    In other words, the second one doesn't just take longer -- it's an infinite loop! – yshavit Jan 12 '17 at 18:06
  • 1
    When you are in the domain from 2^24 to 2^25 where the representable floats are exactly the even integers, when you do f += 1.0f;, the exact mathematical result would be an odd integer. Since this is exactly midway between the two nearest representable numbers, most implementation will pick the doubly even one (i.e. the one divisible by four). If that is the case 16777216.0f + 1.0f would be 16777216.0f (no increment), while 16777218.0f + 1.0f would be 16777220.0f (actual increment is +2). – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 13 '17 at 15:01

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