19

The InputField & Button are custom components that go into a form to create a form. My issue is how do I send the data back up to form so that on button click, I can fire ajax on the form with data (username & password):

export default auth.authApi(
  class SignUpViaEmail extends Component{

    constructor(props){
      super(props);
      this.state = {
        email : "",
        password : ""
      };
      this.storeEmail = this.storeEmail.bind( this );
      this.storePassword = this.storePassword.bind( this );
    }

    storeEmail(e){
      this.setState({ email : e.target.value });
    }

    storePassword(e){
      this.setState({ password : e.target.value });
    }

    handleSignUp(){
      this.props.handleSignUp(this.state);
    }

    render(){
      return(
        <div className="pageContainer">

          <form action="" method="post">
            <InputField labelClass = "label"
                        labelText = "Username"
                        inputId = "signUp_username"
                        inputType = "email"
                        inputPlaceholder = "registered email"
                        inputClass = "input" />
            <Button btnClass = "btnClass"
                    btnLabel = "Submit"
                    onClickEvent = { handleSignUp } />
          </form>
        </div>
      );
    }

  }
);

Or Is it not recommended & I should not create custom child components within the form?

child component => InputField

import React,
       { Component } from "react";

export class InputField extends Component{

  constructor( props ){
    super( props );
    this.state = {
      value : ""
    };
    this.onUserInput = this.onUserInput.bind( this );
  }

  onUserInput( e ){
    this.setState({ value : e.target.value });
    this.props.storeInParentState({[ this.props.inputType ] : e.target.value });
  }

  render(){
    return  <div className = "">
              <label htmlFor = {this.props.inputId}
                     className = {this.props.labelClass}>
                {this.props.labelText}
              </label>
              <input id = {this.props.inputId}
                     type = {this.props.inputType}
                     onChange = {this.onUserInput} />
              <span className = {this.props.validationClass}>
                { this.props.validationNotice }
              </span>
            </div>;
  }
}

Error : I get the error e.target is undefined on the parent storeEmail func.

  • 1
    You could pass a keyup event handler to the inputs so the parent component state is constantly up to date. Then whenever handleSignup is called the form component already has everything it needs. – theleebriggs Jan 12 '17 at 17:28
  • @rufio86 is right, you to need to update your parent component state first. And you need to bind handleSignUp callback, then you will get your state. – hawk Jan 12 '17 at 17:30
  • apologies to both @rufio86 & hawk, please elaborate – Kayote Jan 12 '17 at 17:33
  • Possible duplicate of How to get values from child components in React – Jim G. Jul 11 '18 at 0:35
46

React's one-way data-binding model means that child components cannot send back values to parent components unless explicitly allowed to do so. The React way of doing this is to pass down a callback to the child component (see Facebook's "Forms" guide).

class Parent extends Component {
  constructor() {
    this.state = {
      value: ''
    };
  }

  //...

  handleChangeValue = e => this.setState({value: e.target.value});

  //...

  render() {
    return (
      <Child
        value={this.state.value}
        onChangeValue={this.handleChangeValue}
      />
    );
  }
}

class Child extends Component {
  //...

  render() {
    return (
      <input
        type="text"
        value={this.props.value}
        onChange={this.props.onChangeValue}
      />
    );
  }
}

Take note that the parent component handles the state, while the child component only handles displaying. Facebook's "Lifting State Up" guide is a good resource for learning how to do this.

This way, all data lives within the parent component (in state), and child components are only given a way to update that data (callbacks passed down as props). Now your problem is resolved: your parent component has access to all the data it needs (since the data is stored in state), but your child components are in charge of binding the data to their own individual elements, such as <input> tags.

3

Parent

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import Child from './child'
class Parent extends Component {
  state = {
    value: ''
  }
  onChangeValueHandler = (val) => {
    this.setState({ value: val.target.value })
  }
  render() {
    const { value } = this.state;
    return (
      <div>
        <p> the value is : {value} </p>
        <Child value={value} onChangeValue={this.onChangeValueHandler} />
      </div>
    );
  }
}

export default Parent;

Child

  import React, { Component } from 'react';
  class Child extends Component {
  render() {
  const { value , onChangeValue } = this.props;
  return (
    <div>
      <input type="text"  value={value} onChange={onChangeValue}/> 
    </div>
  );
}
}
  export default Child;

you can see the live example on : https://codesandbox.io/s/two-way-binding-qq1o1?from-embed

-7

You can add a "ref name" in your InputField so you can call some function from it, like:

<InputField 
   ref="userInput"
   labelClass = "label"
   labelText = "Username"
   inputId = "signUp_username"
   inputType = "email"
   inputPlaceholder = "registered email"
   inputClass = "input" />

So you can access it using refs:

this.refs.userInput.getUsernamePassword();

Where getUsernamePassword function would be inside the InputField component, and with the return you can set the state and call your props.handleSignUp

  • While this would work, it's not generally recommended to attach refs to components, much less do it to get values from child components. This problem is more immediately solved by passing down callbacks, which is the canon way to do it. (See Facebook's React guide) – Ian Emnace Jan 13 '17 at 1:59
  • Indeed, the ref approach is the easiest way in his case, but yes, callbacks would be a good choice too. – Imac Jan 13 '17 at 12:30
  • 1
    refs as string are considered a legacy code and are likely to be removed: facebook.github.io/react/docs/refs-and-the-dom.html – Max Kramnik Aug 28 '17 at 21:47

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