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I want to rasterize a 2d doughnut into a matrix/pixels (the result should be a filled doughnut).

The doughnut is defined by r1, r2, x0, y0.

I suspect the optimal solution is some function of Bresenham's algorithm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midpoint_circle_algorithm

Any ideas?

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Yes, it is possible to fill donut with Bresenham circle or Midpoint algorithm.

Start parallel walks for inner and outer circles for the 1st quadrant. Build horizontal segments when Y changes. Stop walk for inner circle when it's top is reached and continue with outer one.

Note that you have to remember the first (biggest) outer X-value, but the last (smallest) inner X-value for the same Y.

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Bresenham is far from optimal these days ... what about exploiting circle equation:

(x-x0)^2 + (x-y0)^2 = r^2

so let:

x0,y0 - center
r1 - outer radius
r2 - inner radius
r1<=r2
xs,ys - screen resolution
scr[ys][xy] - screen matrix

in C++ it looks like this:

int x,y,xx,yy,rr,rr1=r1*r1,rr2=r2*r2;
for (y=y0-r1;y<=y0+r1;y++)                  // loop all y positions
 if ((y>=0)&&(y<ys))                        // clip to screen
  for (yy=y-y0,yy*=yy,x=x0-r1;x<=x0+r1;x++) // loop all x positions
   if ((x>=0)&&(x<xs))                      // clip to screen
    {
    xx=x-x0; xx*=xx; rr=xx+yy;
    if ((rr>=rr2)&&(rr<=rr1))               // is in between radiuses?
     scr[y][x]=fill_color;
    }

You can get rid of the screen clipping if statements easily by pre-computing bounds for both loops that are inside screen ...

For filled circles is this approach usually faster then Bresenham not to mention easily parallelisable.

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