2

I need support to do the following task for a file contains around 5000 lines.

input

    cp abc/P_10_10A.pdb lig.pdb
    cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
    cp abc/run.pl .
    ./run.pl 

    cp abc/P_10_11A.pdb lig.pdb
    cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
    cp abc/run.pl .
    ./run.pl

    cp abc/P_10_11B.pdb lig.pdb
    cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
    cp abc/run.pl .
    ./run.pl

output

    cp abc/P_10_10A.pdb lig.pdb
    cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
    cp abc/run.pl .
    ./run.pl
    mv *.* P_10_10A

    cp abc/P_10_11A.pdb lig.pdb
    cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
    cp abc/run.pl .
    ./run.pl
    mv *.* P_10_11A

    cp abc/P_10_11B.pdb lig.pdb
    cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
    cp abc/run.pl .
    ./run.pl
    mv *.* P_10_11B

I could add mv . as follows..

    sed '0~4 a\mv *.*  \'       text_file.sh

How can I do the rest? thanks a lot.

  • 1
    you need to work in multiline mode or using holding buffer to keep the folder name. Also, with a a you can't modify the content of this appended line, it's only in ouptut stream, not in current working buffer – NeronLeVelu Jan 13 '17 at 12:34
  • Are the leading spaces in your data really there? Are the blank lines really there? – Borodin Jan 13 '17 at 15:16
0

One liner

awk -F'[/.]' '!s && /cp/{s=$2;}s && /\.\/run\.pl/{$0=$0 RS "mv *.* "s;s=""}1' file

Explanation

awk -F'[/.]' '                    # -F set field sep forward slash or dot
      !s && /cp/{                 # if s is not set and cp word found
             s=$2                 # Assign second column value to s
      }
      s && /\.\/run\.pl/{         # when s is set and ./run.pl found
        $0 = $0 RS "mv *.* "s     # append current record with mv *.* value to s
        s=""                      # Reset s
      }1                          # perform default operation print $0
     ' file                       # Input file

Input

$ cat f
cp abc/P_10_10A.pdb lig.pdb
cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
cp abc/run.pl .
./run.pl 

cp abc/P_10_11A.pdb lig.pdb
cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
cp abc/run.pl .
./run.pl

cp abc/P_10_11B.pdb lig.pdb
cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
cp abc/run.pl .
./run.pl

Output

$ awk -F'[/.]' '!s && /cp/{s=$2}s && /\.\/run\.pl/{$0 = $0 RS "mv *.* "s; s=""}1' f
cp abc/P_10_10A.pdb lig.pdb
cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
cp abc/run.pl .
./run.pl 
mv *.* P_10_10A

cp abc/P_10_11A.pdb lig.pdb
cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
cp abc/run.pl .
./run.pl
mv *.* P_10_11A

cp abc/P_10_11B.pdb lig.pdb
cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
cp abc/run.pl .
./run.pl
mv *.* P_10_11B

For space modify this statement

$0=$0 RS "    mv *.* "s;
  • 1
    Did not understand the reason for down vote, down voter please let me know what's wrong here – Akshay Hegde Jan 13 '17 at 11:55
  • 1
    I didn't downvoted the answer but given output doesn't contains space before lines starting with mv *.* P_10_11B. – AbhiNickz Jan 13 '17 at 12:05
  • 1
    @AbhiNickz : If you need space please modify like this $0=$0 RS " mv *.* "s; , put space just before mv *.* – Akshay Hegde Jan 13 '17 at 12:10
  • 1
    Thanks! it is working exactly as I needed. – user2176228 Jan 13 '17 at 12:56
1

a sed version

sed '/^[[:blank:]]*cp /,/^[[:blank:]]*\./ {
      H
      /^[[:blank:]]*\./!d
      s/.*//;x
      s#^\(\(.[[:blank:]]*\)cp \)\([^[:blank:]]*/\([^[:blank:]]*\)\)\(\.pdb.*\)#\1\3\5\2mv *.* \4#
      }' YourFile

info:

  • proceed by paragraph (/^[[:blank:]]*cp /,/^[[:blank:]]*\./) from first cp until ./
  • add each line to holding buffer (H)
  • if not last line of paragraph, delete the line from current work buffer (so do nothing more and cycle with a read of next line) (/^[[:blank:]]*\./!d)
  • empty the line and swap buffer content (s/.*//;x)
  • extract the file name of the paragraph and add it to the end with the mv info (s#^\(\(.[[:blank:]]*\)cp \)\([^[:blank:]]*/\([^[:blank:]]*\)\)\(\.pdb.*\)#\1\3\5\2mv *.* \4#). This regex is the tricky one with some special info

    • there is a new line as 1st character (due to first H and not h)
    • i use several subgroup to use them as pattern easily like the second group, a new line and first series of space (if any) that is included in 1st group
  • let sed print the result

    • modified paragraph
    • untouched line like empty lines between paragraph

an awk version

awk -F '[/.]' '
   /cp / {f[n++]=$2}
   /\.\/run/ {print;sub( /\..*/, "mv *.* " f[n=0])}
   7
   ' YourFile

info:

  • use . and / as field separator (-F '[/.]')
  • for each line with cp, keep folder name in and incremental array (first index = 0) (/cp / {f[n++]=$2})
  • for each line with ./run: (/\.\/run/ {print;sub( /\..*/, "mv *.* " f[n=0])})
    • print the line
    • replace the text part with mv ...
    • the good name is always f[0]
    • reset the index in same time (n=0)
  • print the line 7
1

This Perl approach expects the path to the input file on the command line and sends the output to stdout

use strict;
use warnings 'all';

local $/ = "";

while ( <> ) {
    if ( m| \b cp \s+ (?: \w+ / )* (\w+) |x ) {
        my $pdb = $1;
        s/ .* \S \K /\nmv *.* $pdb/xs;
    }
    print;
}

output

cp abc/P_10_10A.pdb lig.pdb
cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
cp abc/run.pl .
./run.pl
mv *.* P_10_10A 

cp abc/P_10_11A.pdb lig.pdb
cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
cp abc/run.pl .
./run.pl
mv *.* P_10_11A

cp abc/P_10_11B.pdb lig.pdb
cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
cp abc/run.pl .
./run.pl
mv *.* P_10_11B
0

This works for the given data in perl.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

open my $IN, "<", "test";
open my $OUT, ">", "test_new";
my $insert;
while (my $line = <$IN>){
    chomp($line);

    if($line =~ m/cp abc\/(.*).pdb lig.pdb$/){
        $insert = $1;
    }

    if($line =~ m/    \.\/run\.pl/){
        $line = $line."\n".'    mv *.* '.$insert;
    }
    print $OUT $line."\n";
}
close $IN;
close $OUT;

OUTPUT:

cp abc/P_10_10A.pdb lig.pdb
cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
cp abc/run.pl .
./run.pl
mv *.* P_10_10A

cp abc/P_10_11A.pdb lig.pdb
cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
cp abc/run.pl .
./run.pl
mv *.* P_10_11A

cp abc/P_10_11B.pdb lig.pdb
cp abc/protein.pdbqt .
cp abc/run.pl .
./run.pl
mv *.* P_10_11B
  • I can't account for the downvote, but your code is very non-Perlish. It also matches exact amounts of whitespace, when the leading spaces in the OP's data probably aren't even there. Your second if should also be an elseif. Put it up on Code Review if you want a thorough analysis. – Borodin Jan 13 '17 at 15:12
  • Thanks @Borodin for your given analysis, I will keep this in mind. – AbhiNickz Jan 14 '17 at 13:07

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