22

Consider the below code which uses scala logging:

class MyClass extends LazyLogging {
  logger.debug("This is very convenient")
}

What is the difference if I use StrictLogging instead? When should I use which?

Edit: I know what lazy is. But I am unable to get it from logging perspective and how does it differ from its functionality when compared to strict logging. This is so that I can understand when to use which one.

1
  • 1
    you should include more info. what's that LazyLogging class? – pedrorijo91 Jan 14 '17 at 11:10
12

I'm assuming you're refering to typesafes scala-logging library. The difference is only in the way logger is defined by the underlying logger, it can either be defined as a normal value, or a lazy value, meaning:

trait LazyLogging {
  @volatile protected lazy val logger: Logger =
      Logger(LoggerFactory.getLogger(getClass.getName))
}

vs

trait StrictLogging {
  protected val logger: Logger =
    Logger(LoggerFactory.getLogger(getClass.getName))
}
2
  • From a logging context what advantage do we get that logger is declared a lazy Val? Does it become non blocking like Akka logging? – codingsplash Jan 18 '17 at 1:17
  • LazyLogging is available for when you want to postpone Logger creation. The reasons for doing this would be dependent on your use case but in most instances, StrictLogging would be what you probably want. Ask yourself "if I'm going to end up logging regularly anyway, why not create it up front". – Cole Stanfield Mar 9 '17 at 21:53
23

Well, everyone seems to have covered what lazy means but didn't really mention how this affects your choice so I'll try to list the guidelines I follow myself.

  • Use StrictLogging pretty much by default, especially if the class is a singleton or you know the log methods will always get called.

  • Use LazyLogging if you're creating lots of objects with this trait repetitively. If you're doing that though, you may think about putting this logger in a companion object of the class so you don't keep instantiating Logger and calling LoggerFactory.getLogger(...) over and over.

Can anyone think of other reasons to use/not use LazyLogging over StrictLogging?

2
  • 9
    When using frameworks like Spark, the code blocks that you write to effect a computation must be Serializable. If you have a class that you want to broadcast around the cluster and you want to use logging in that class, the best way could be to use LazyLogging. This jira ticket suggests (to me) that LazzyLogging loggers are Serializable (but i have not yet verified it myself): github.com/lightbend/scala-logging/issues/26 – Chris Bedford Jul 12 '18 at 22:10
  • I believe this answer should be accepted one – Sergey Lihoman Apr 28 at 9:27
7

What is the difference between scala StrictLogging and Lazylogging?

Let's first read both trait definitions;

trait LazyLogging {
 @volatile protected lazy val logger: Logger =
 Logger(LoggerFactory.getLogger(getClass.getName))
}

trait StrictLogging {
protected val logger: Logger =
 Logger(LoggerFactory.getLogger(getClass.getName))
}

The main difference is @volatile and lazy keywords.

How lazy works?

The main characteristic of a lazy val is that the bound expression is not evaluated immediately, but once on the first access. When the initial access happens, the expression is evaluated. On subsequent access, no further evaluation occurs, instead the stored result is returned immediately.

For multithread scenario, @volatile will force memory into consistent state across multiple threads.

Actually, it depends on the individual use case which trait to use LazyLogging or StrictLogging.

5
  • Thanks for the nice answer. Is lazy logging non-blocking? If so how? – codingsplash Jan 15 '17 at 22:23
  • 1
    The Logger class from the com.typesafe.scalalogging package wraps an underlying SLF4J logger. SLF4J serves as a simple facade or abstraction for various logging frameworks (e.g. java.util.logging, logback, log4j etc). You need to look at logging framework implementation. Hope, this helps! – fabfas Jan 17 '17 at 3:07
  • Is it apparent to use LazyLogging trait for logging? All logging? It's not apparent to me. – Cole Stanfield Mar 9 '17 at 21:54
  • Yes, it is not apparent when you do not know the use case - corrected! – fabfas Mar 16 '17 at 12:25
  • Helpful info on lazy but still not addressing the point I think. – Cole Stanfield Mar 16 '17 at 22:33

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