1

Can someone please explain how exactly "transition-timing-function:cubic-bezier();" works please?

Here is my code

.sample_box{
    background-color: orange;
    height: 70px;
    width: 35%;
    transition: width 2s;
    transition-timing-function: cubic-bezier(0.1,0.1,0.8,3.0);
 }
.sample_box:hover{
    width: 100%;
}
  • I've tried to break up the 2 seconds into 4 parts as "cubic-bezier" value but my box went insane, it goes completely out of the screen when hover in both directions
2

You need a bit of math background to really understand in depth about the cubic-bezier function as this function defines the control points of a cubic-bezier curve. I am not a math expert and so can only clarify the CSS portion of it. If you really need details on how a cubic bezier curve is drawn then wait to see if you get a better answer here (or) try asking on one of the math SE sites whichever is better suited to the question.

A cubic-bezier curve is a curve that is drawn based on four points P0, P1, P2 and P3. Here the points P0 and P3 are the start and end points of the curve whereas P1 and P2 are the control points that go towards defining the curvature of curve.

The four input values that are supplied to the cubic-bezier timing function specify the coordinates of the control points P1 and P2 of the cubic bezier curve (for the curve used by CSS, the points P0 and P3 are always (0,0) and (1,1) respectively). Based on the curve that is drawn (using the input values), the UAs will determine the amount of progress the transition or the animation must have made at any given point in time.

As specified in the W3C Specs, the values for x (parameters 1 and 3) should always be between 0 -1 whereas the values for y (parameters 1 and 4) can exceed this range. Below is the extract:

Both x values must be in the range [0, 1] or the definition is invalid. The y values can exceed this range.

For a live demo of how the curve is drawn based on the input value and how that shows the progress at any given point in time, you can refer to this great page created by Lea Verou. It allows you to alter the values of the control points on the graph, see how the curve changes based on it and also allows you to see a demo of how that curve would work on an actual transition.

The curve that is drawn for cubic-bezier(0.1,0.1,0.8,3.0) would look like this and as you can see it is completely normal that with this curve, the width exceeds 100% before the transition is completed and then comes back down to 100% by the end (as that is the end value). For the hover out, it will be the reverse behavior and so it will go the other way before coming to the end value (for your example, you won't see it because width cannot be lower than 0% but you'll see it in the second one below.)

.sample_box {
  background-color: orange;
  height: 70px;
  width: 35%;
  transition: width 2s;
  transition-timing-function: cubic-bezier(0.1, 0.1, 0.8, 3.0);
}
.sample_box:hover {
  width: 100%;
}

/* just for demo */

div.container {
  height: 200px;
  width: 300px;
  border: 1px solid;
  margin: 0px auto;
}

.sample_box_2 {
  background-color: tomato;
  height: 70px;
  width: 35%;
  transform: translate(0%, 0%);
  transition: transform 2s;
  transition-timing-function: cubic-bezier(0.1, 0.1, 0.8, 3.0);
}
.container.second:hover .sample_box_2 {
  transform: translate(100%, 100%);
}
<div class='container'>
  <div class='sample_box'></div>
</div>

<div class='container second'>
  <div class='sample_box_2'></div>
</div>

  • Thank you Harry I highly appreciate your help – Pall Arpad Jan 14 '17 at 17:49
  • You're welcome @arpadpall21. Please consider accepting the answer if it helped. It is not mandatory to accept but accepting indicates that your problem has been solved. You can take your time before accepting and it needn't be immediate :) – Harry Jan 14 '17 at 17:51
  • By the way @arpadpall21, accepting means clicking on the hollow tick mark below the voting buttons on the left hand side of the answer. – Harry Jan 14 '17 at 17:53
  • Thanks for remembering me I'm new on this site, but for now I can't vote you up because I need 4 more reputation for that :( – Pall Arpad Jan 14 '17 at 18:50
  • 1
    Thank you for you help :) – Pall Arpad Jan 14 '17 at 18:51

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