I'm working on a react app and stumbled on a situation where my components continually update each other if I don't use shouldComponentUpdate() to get in the way. I am trying to decide if this is the best way to handle this kind of change or if I should try to refactor my code so I don't have to stop the update in this way.

My actual code is full of a bunch of other stuff that's going on, so I put together a couple of dummy examples.

Parent component:

    class App extends React.Component {
      constructor() {
        super();

        this.stateChange = this.stateChange.bind(this);

        this.state = {
          foo: 'bar'
        }
      }


      stateChange(change) {
        this.setState({foo: change});
      }

      render() {
        return (
          <div>
            <p>Hello World</p>
            <ChildComponent stateChange={this.stateChange} />
          </div>
          )
      }

    }

Child component:

    class ChildComponent extends React.Component {
      constructor() {
        super();

        this.renderDecision = this.renderDecision.bind(this);
        this.updateStage = this.updateStage.bind(this);
        this.state = {
          stage: [1],
          hello: 'world'
        }
      }

      updateStage(e) {
          let theStage = [...this.state.stage];
          theStage.push(1);
          this.setState({stage: theStage});
        }

      renderDecision() {

        if (this.state.stage.length < 3) {
          return (
            <p>There are {this.state.stage.length} items. <button onClick={(e) => this.updateStage(e)}>Click here to update.</button></p>
            )
        } else if (this.state.stage.length === 3) {
          this.props.stateChange(this.state.hello); /// updates the parent which updates the child which updates the parent... ad infinitum
          return (
            <p>Hello {this.state.hello}, there are {theStage} items.</p>
          )
        }
      }

      render() {
        return (
          <div>
            (this.renderDecision())
          </div>
        )
      }
    }

As you can see, once the stage array reaches the length 3 and stays there, the app & child components get locked into a loop of setting state.

This can be fixed by adding something like this to ChildComponent --

      componentShouldUpdate() {
        if (this.state.stage.length === 3) {
          return false;
        } else return true;
      }

But what I want to know is whether or not this is best practice, or if I should come up with some other solution. My child component has state because it cycles through about 6 different parameters in quick succession without the rest of the app having to be aware of what's going on, so it doesn't make sense to rerender the entire app by passing the stage all the way back up to the parent.

Hope this question makes sense. Thanks for reading.

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should NEVER change a state on render, check this issue. Make those state decisions and populations outside of render.

  • 1
    Oh no! Whoops. This helps a lot, thanks so much. (In my actual code, most of my state change decisions are wrapped in functions that run on user input; there's one that's not, which is the one that's causing my loop.) – JSilv Jan 14 '17 at 20:33

What you are doing is not at all correct. Just think how react updates the DOM. A component's render method is called whenever the state of the component changes.

In your component you trigger the function which updates the state (renderDecision) whenever the render method is called. So when the render is called the state gets updated and since the state got updated, render is again called. This forces an infinite cycle.

The solution

Use an appropriate lifecycle method or an event (for example onClick) to update the state. I your case you can set the state in componentDidMount or componentWillMount

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