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Inner classes can be instantiated outside the outer class using Outer_class_object.new inner_class(). But the question arises what happens to Outer class object? means there is no reference variable referencing to it. Obviously it will be on the heap till the inner class object is on heap because Inner classes feed on outer class. So what mechanism java uses in such situations? See the following code...
What happens to the outer class object in the main of NormalInnerClassDemo that we used to create object of inner class. It has to stay alive till the 'inner' is alive.There is no reference variable referring to it doesn't that make it eligible for garbage collection ? If not how does Java manages to tell the garbage collector not to do so ?

class Outer {

    private String  string = "Google";

    class Inner {

        public Inner() {
            System.out.println("From Inner:" + string );
        }
    }

    public void test() {
        //Some code here
    }
}

public class NormalInnerClassDemo {

    public static void main( String[] args ) {
        Outer.Inner inner = new Outer().new Inner();
    }
}
  • your question is not clear. you can create object of the outer class and also instantiate it as per your need. what is your actual problem here? – Wasi Ahmad Jan 15 '17 at 4:46
  • In main method of NormalInnerClassDemo we're creating object of inner class using object of Outer class (created on the fly) ,which has no reference variable pointing to it. But Outer must stay alive till Inner is alive . So how does Java tells GC that "don't remove 'outer' object because there is another object 'Inner' which I'm still using !" . – omjego Jan 15 '17 at 4:55
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    @omjego The inner class instance has a hidden reference to the outer class, but that has nothing to do with your first sentence whatsoever. – user207421 Jan 15 '17 at 4:57
  • @EJP Exactly ! I was looking for this 'hidden reference' which doesn't make Outer class object created in my code eligible for gc. Is there is any document about this fact so that i can go through it ? – omjego Jan 15 '17 at 5:16
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    JLS §8.1.3 "An instance i of a direct inner class C of a class or interface O is associated with an instance of O, known as the immediately enclosing instance of i. The immediately enclosing instance of an object, if any, is determined when the object is created (§15.9.2)." §15.9.2 "If C is a non-private inner member class, then the first argument to the constructor is the immediately enclosing instance of i ..." That instance reference is stored in the inner instance, keeping the outer one reachable. – Lew Bloch Jan 15 '17 at 6:01
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Inner classes can be instantiated outside the outer class using Outer_class.inner_class.

No they can't. They are created via:

outer.new Outer.Inner(...)

where outer is a primary-expression that evaluates to a reference to an instance of Outer, for example new Outer(...).

or

this.new Inner(...)

if you are inside Outer, or for short

new Inner(...)

if you are inside Outer.

But the question arises what happens to Outer class object? means there is no reference variable referencing to it.

Oh yes there is: see above.

Obviously it will be on the heap till the inner class object is on heap because Inner classes feed on outer class. So what mechanism java uses in such situations?

Your question is founded on a mistake.

-1

First this is Java so why are you worried about heap memory when the VM cleans up for you? 8-)

To help you understand this, ADD the following to Outer class (default constructor):

Outer() {
  System.out.println("Outer()");
}

Then run the program and you will see Outer is created too. Glad you are interested in how/what's created.

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    Outer is not created when you create an Inner. It must already exist, otherwise there is no way of creating the inner class. – user207421 Jan 15 '17 at 4:56
  • We are saying the same thing. Outer must exist either prior or at the time you create Inner. You create them together via new Outer().new Inner() but you DO create Outer in this statement. Think of the objects as Outer CONTAINS an instance object of Inner. So the inner variable references the whole object. That is why if you define a function called testInner() { test(); } and invoke it via inner->testInner(); it WILL work. The inner variable does actually reference the complete object with Outer. – ChuckB Jan 15 '17 at 18:23

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