73

I made a little helper function:

import zipfile

def main(archive_list=[],zfilename='default.zip'):
    print zfilename
    zout = zipfile.ZipFile(zfilename, "w")
    for fname in archive_list:
        print "writing: ", fname
        zout.write(fname)
    zout.close()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()  

The problem is that all my files are NOT being COMPRESSED! The files are the same size and, effectively, just the extension is being change to ".zip" (from ".xls" in this case).

I'm running python 2.5 on winXP sp2.

150

This is because ZipFile requires you to specify the compression method. If you don't specify it, it assumes the compression method to be zipfile.ZIP_STORED, which only stores the files without compressing them. You need to specify the method to be zipfile.ZIP_DEFLATED. You will need to have the zlib module installed for this (it is usually installed by default).

import zipfile

def main(archive_list=[],zfilename='default.zip'):
    print zfilename
    zout = zipfile.ZipFile(zfilename, "w", zipfile.ZIP_DEFLATED) # <--- this is the change you need to make
    for fname in archive_list:
        print "writing: ", fname
        zout.write(fname)
    zout.close()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()  
3
  • 38
    what a terrible default! Why?! – gabe Oct 10 '14 at 17:02
  • 10
    Because the zlib module is not always available, especially in sandboxed installations. – Chinmay Kanchi Oct 10 '14 at 17:32
  • 6
    I ran into the same issue with zip files. I have to admit my fault was not reading documentation before trying example code from python docs. I think example code should include ZIP_DEFLATED parameter to make it less confusing. – marcin_koss May 6 '15 at 14:08
13

There is a really easy way to compress zip format,

Use in shutil.make_archive library.

For example:

import shutil

shutil.make_archive(file_name, 'zip', file location after compression)

Can see more extensive documentation at: Here

1
  • 1
    Thanks for posting this. This works to achieve archiving of files very easily without going through the hoops of zipping. It's a great bookend to processes that need to have their data dumped for record-keeping. I consolidated ~10 lines of code down to 3 with this. – user3507825 Sep 9 '20 at 17:34

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