0

Why does PHP output two subdirectories that has: . and .. when reading a directory.

From PHP.net:

<?php
$dir = "/etc/php5/";

// Open a known directory, and proceed to read its contents
if (is_dir($dir)) {
    if ($dh = opendir($dir)) {
        while (($file = readdir($dh)) !== false) {
            echo "filename: $file : filetype: " . filetype($dir . $file) . "\n";
        }
        closedir($dh);
    }
}
?>

Outputs:

filename: . : filetype: dir
filename: .. : filetype: dir
filename: apache : filetype: dir
filename: cgi : filetype: dir
filename: cli : filetype: dir

Why does it do that?

2
  • it's normal thing in *nix world Nov 12, 2010 at 16:37
  • 1
    You may want to look into DirectoryIterator instead of readdir... It even has a method $file->isDot() to detect this very thing...
    – ircmaxell
    Nov 12, 2010 at 16:50

3 Answers 3

10

Because "." and ".." are actual directories (in the *nix world).

"." refers to the current directory
".." refers to the parent directory.

If you do an "ls" you'll see the same exact output.

2
  • Ah, I see... explains it, I was wondering if they were hidden, hidden folders that no one may be able to see :P Thanks.
    – MacMac
    Nov 12, 2010 at 16:38
  • Hidden directories start with "." but contain other characters. For example ".mozilla" and ".emacs"
    – mote
    Nov 12, 2010 at 16:39
2

. and .. are symlinks to the current and parent directory and they are present in most file systems, so if you don't want these to show in the dir listing in your code, try this:

$skipped = array('.', '..'); 
while (($file = readdir($dh)) !== false) {
   if(in_array($file, $skipped)) continue;
   echo "filename: $file : filetype: " . filetype($dir . $file) . "\n";
}
closedir($dh);
0

Use glob() instead if you don't need the . and .. entries.

1

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.