20

I want to create a toy training set from the XOR function:

xor = [[0, 0, 0],
       [0, 1, 1],
       [1, 0, 1],
       [1, 1, 0]]

input_x = np.random.choice(a=xor, size=200)

However, this is giving me

{ValueError} 'a' must be 1-dimensoinal

But, if I add e.g. a number to this list:

xor = [[0, 0, 0],
       [0, 1, 1],
       [1, 0, 1],
       [1, 1, 0],
       1337]       # With this it will work

input_x = np.random.choice(a=xor, size=200)

it starts to work. Why is this the case and how can I make this work without having to add another primitive to the xor list?

3
  • 2
    what do you expect from np.random.choice(a=xor, size=200) a single number or an array with 3 values?
    – DiKorsch
    Commented Jan 17, 2017 at 13:26
  • 1
    @BloodyD I expected a list of 200 randomly drawn samples from xor with replacement. Commented Jan 17, 2017 at 13:31
  • 3
    Why not just use random.choice instead? Since you are working with Python's lists already.
    – Francisco
    Commented Jan 17, 2017 at 13:34

6 Answers 6

19

In case of an array I would do the following:

xor = np.array([[0,0,0],
       [0,1,1],
       [1,0,1],
       [1,1,0]])
rnd_indices = np.random.choice(len(xor), size=200)

xor_data = xor[rnd_indices]
4
  • Well, I guess I'll have to go that road :D Thanks :) Commented Jan 17, 2017 at 13:38
  • 3
    you could also optimize the code, as others suggested with np.random.choice(len(xor), size=200) ;)
    – DiKorsch
    Commented Jan 17, 2017 at 13:39
  • This will take a single element in a multidimensional array, right? If you have 100 images, your array may have a shape like (100 x 32 x 32 x 3), and this line of code will return a single image, with shape (32 x 32 x 3). What we are searching is a random subset of the array, with shape ( A x 32 x 32 x 3) where A is the number of randomly picked values Commented Jun 22, 2020 at 7:06
  • @FedericoDorato no it won't. By settings size=200 in the np.random.choice function, rnd_indices returns an array of 200 values, then indexing with this array returns your desired A=200 x 32 x 32 x 3 array. (I hope, it is not too late to clarify this :) )
    – DiKorsch
    Commented Apr 27, 2021 at 7:18
6

If you want a random list from xor, you should probably be doing this.

xor[np.random.choice(len(xor),1)]
1
  • This will take a single element in a multidimensional array, right? If you have 100 images, your array may have a shape like (100 x 32 x 32 x 3), and this line of code will return a single image, with shape (32 x 32 x 3). What we are searching is a random subset of the array, with shape ( A x 32 x 32 x 3) where A is the number of randomly picked values Commented Jun 22, 2020 at 7:06
3

You can use the random package instead:

import random
input_x = [random.choice(xor) for _ in range(200)]
3
  • 1
    I don't think you want to transpose xor. Commented Jan 17, 2017 at 13:41
  • I assumed the samples were to be of 4 elements. But I'll update the answer, thanks! Commented Jan 17, 2017 at 13:42
  • 1
    Assuming that the OP was searching how to take multiple random elements (I believe that is the case) this should be the accepted answer! Commented Jun 22, 2020 at 7:10
2

Interesting!! Seems that numpy implicitly converts the input to np.array first. so, for your first input

np.array(xor).shape == (4, 3)

while for the second value

np.array(xor).shape == (5, )

so, the second value is seen by numpy as 1d!!!

So, to pick a random row, just pick a random index, and then the corresponding row

ind = np.choice(len(xor))
random_row = xor[ind, :]
4
  • yes, numpy tries to identify the common datatype of your values in the array. In the first case this is int but in the second it is only object, since it compares objects in the same dimension. Hence, you get an array with dtype object and the shape (5,) for the 2nd value
    – DiKorsch
    Commented Jan 17, 2017 at 13:33
  • thanks, good explanation. do you remember where in the documentation (or any other source) is this mentioned? numpy documentation is a little sparse...
    – aris
    Commented Jan 17, 2017 at 13:42
  • I don't know, where the documentation for this is, but I have faced it couple of times on my own. EDIT short googling: docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/… "[...] dtype : data-type, optional The desired data-type for the array. If not given, then the type will be determined as the minimum type required to hold the objects in the sequence. [...]"
    – DiKorsch
    Commented Jan 17, 2017 at 13:44
  • Again, as other answers, this will just return a single random value, not many Commented Jun 22, 2020 at 7:11
0

With focus on performance, we could use the decimal number equivalents of those four numbers, feed those to np.random.choice() to generate 200 such numbers randomly chosen and finally get their binary equivalents with bit-shift operation.

Thus, an implementation would be -

def bitshift_approach(N):
    nums = np.random.choice(np.array([0,3,5,6]),size=(N))
    return ((nums & (1 << np.arange(3))[:,None])!=0).T.astype(int)

Another approach would be using very similar to what others have suggested to use np.random.choice(len(xor) to generate the row indices and then use row-indexing to select rows off xor. A slight modification to that would be to use np.take to select those rows. With such repeated indices, as is the case here, this should be performant.

Thus, an alternative approach would be -

np.take(xor,np.random.choice(len(xor), size=N))

Runtime test -

In [42]: N = 200

In [43]: %timeit xor[np.random.choice(np.arange(len(xor)), size=N)]
    ...: %timeit xor[np.random.choice(len(xor), size=N)]
    ...: %timeit bitshift_approach(N)
    ...: %timeit np.take(xor,np.random.choice(len(xor), size=N))
    ...: 
10000 loops, best of 3: 43.3 µs per loop
10000 loops, best of 3: 38.3 µs per loop
10000 loops, best of 3: 59.4 µs per loop
10000 loops, best of 3: 35 µs per loop

In [44]: N = 1000

In [45]: %timeit xor[np.random.choice(np.arange(len(xor)), size=N)]
    ...: %timeit xor[np.random.choice(len(xor), size=N)]
    ...: %timeit bitshift_approach(N)
    ...: %timeit np.take(xor,np.random.choice(len(xor), size=N))
    ...: 
10000 loops, best of 3: 69.5 µs per loop
10000 loops, best of 3: 64.7 µs per loop
10000 loops, best of 3: 77.7 µs per loop
10000 loops, best of 3: 38.7 µs per loop

In [46]: N = 10000

In [47]: %timeit xor[np.random.choice(np.arange(len(xor)), size=N)]
    ...: %timeit xor[np.random.choice(len(xor), size=N)]
    ...: %timeit bitshift_approach(N)
    ...: %timeit np.take(xor,np.random.choice(len(xor), size=N))
    ...: 
1000 loops, best of 3: 363 µs per loop
1000 loops, best of 3: 351 µs per loop
1000 loops, best of 3: 225 µs per loop
10000 loops, best of 3: 134 µs per loop
0

You can use random.choice() directly and just run it 200 times to get 200 sample Since np.random.choice() requires values to be in 1 d shape like ["1","2","3"] and can't work with a list of lists or list of tuples only list of scaler values

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