24

I'm using VS Code for TypeScript/JavaScript development. When I open a file it will check that file for errors. The problem is if I'm refactoring (like I move some shared code to a new location or change a name) it won't show me the errors this caused until I open the file with the problem. ...so if I want to do extensive refactoring I have to open every file just to make it scan the file for errors.

How can I make VS Code scan the whole project for errors without having to open each file one by one manually?

  • 1
    Would like to know why this was flagged to be closed. Seems like a direct question that has at least one answer. If it was inappropriate, I'd like to learn why so I can correct my behaviour. – WillyC Jan 18 '17 at 0:17
  • All the answers seem to be performing Typescript checks, correct me if I am wrong? I would like to do exactly what the title asks, go through all source files in a project looking for "PROBLEMS" - shown in the panel with TERMINAL, etc. These problems depend on the extensions installed. – Damien Golding Nov 23 '19 at 11:00
  • 1
    I think you’d have to select the appropriate problemMatcher for your situation. For my situation, any problems that would show up in the “problems” panel are identified with this method (and they do indeed display in that panel). – WillyC Nov 23 '19 at 21:44
11

Figured it out. Note this answer is specific to TypeScript, which is what I am using. Here it is:

Make sure typescript is installed globally (I just had mine installed locally apparently): npm install -g typescript

Then in VS Code press Shift+Ctrl+B. If you don't have a task runner set up it will ask what you want. I selected typescript and the tasks.json file will look like this:

{
    "version": "0.1.0",
    "command": "tsc",
    "isShellCommand": true,
    "args": ["-p", "."],
    "showOutput": "silent",
    "problemMatcher": "$tsc"
}

Then pressing Shift+Ctrl+B (or Shift+Command+B in macOS) will check the entire project for problems and they will be reported in your "problems" panel.

  • 2
    There's no need for having TypeScript installed globally. Use the one included in the project instead. Just set the command to "node" and the args to ["./node_modules/typescript/bin/tsc", "-p", "."]. – Honza Kalfus Sep 13 '19 at 7:18
7

For the most recent version of tasks.json this is the correct json, following deprecations in version 1.14. Create this as /.vscode/tasks.json

{
    "version": "2.0.0",
    "command": "tsc",
    "type": "shell",
    "args": [
        "-p",
        "."
    ],
    "presentation": {
        "reveal": "silent"
    },
    "problemMatcher": "$tsc"
}
  • I'm not familiar with tasks.json, how do I invoke this? – devrobf Apr 14 '19 at 11:48
  • 2
    @devrobf "Pressing Ctrl+Shift+B or running Run Build Task from the global Terminal menu show the following picker:" code.visualstudio.com/docs/editor/tasks – The Red Pea Aug 18 '19 at 16:58
3

If you don't want to install TypeScript globally, you can do the following:

  1. Add a validate-typescript run script to ./package.json. --noEmit means that the compiler will won't generate any JavaScript files.
{
  "scripts": {
    "validate-typescript": "tsc --noEmit"
  }
}
  1. Let VSCode know about the run script in /.vscode/tasks.json.
{
  "version": "2.0.0",
  "tasks": [
    {
      "type": "npm",
      "script": "validate-typescript",
      "problemMatcher": [
        "$tsc"
      ]
    }
  ]
}
  1. To run the tasks hit the F1 key and select 'Run Task', and then 'npm: validate-typescript'.
  • Where is settings? – Ben Taliadoros Mar 28 '18 at 9:48
  • I get type error from files in node_modules when I do this :( – Sammi Nov 21 '19 at 14:42
  • You can specify what files to include in your tsconfig.json file, @Sammi – Jan Aagaard Nov 22 '19 at 21:41
2

Once you have open your project in vs code, open the vs code terminal and run:

node_modules/.bin/tsc --noEmit

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.