tf.random_normal(shape, mean=0.0, stddev=1.0, dtype=tf.float32, seed=None, name=None) outputs random values from a normal distribution.

tf.truncated_normal(shape, mean=0.0, stddev=1.0, dtype=tf.float32, seed=None, name=None) outputs random values from a truncated normal distribution.

I tried googling 'truncated normal distribution'. But didn't understand much.

up vote 46 down vote accepted

The documentation says it all: For truncated normal distribution:

The generated values follow a normal distribution with specified mean and standard deviation, except that values whose magnitude is more than 2 standard deviations from the mean are dropped and re-picked.

Most probably it is easy to understand the difference by plotting the graph for yourself (%magic is because I use jupyter notebook):

import tensorflow as tf
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

%matplotlib inline  

n = 500000
A = tf.truncated_normal((n,))
B = tf.random_normal((n,))
with tf.Session() as sess:
    a, b = sess.run([A, B])

And now

plt.hist(a, 100, (-4.2, 4.2));
plt.hist(b, 100, (-4.2, 4.2));

enter image description here


The point for using truncated normal is to overcome saturation of tome functions like sigmoid (where if the value is too big/small, the neuron stops learning).

  • thanks for the code. It is great. however, i can't print out histogram on the pc as shown below. Do you know why? ,>>> plt.hist(b,100,(-4.2,4.2)); (array([ 3.00000000e+00, 6.00000000e+00, 9.00000000e+00, 4.00000000e+00, 1.60000000e+01, 8.00000000e+00, 3.864, 3.948, 4.032, 4.116, 4.2 ]), <a list of 100 Patch objects>) – Hong Jun 20 '17 at 15:48
  • @Hong sorry, but I have no idea why. It looks like it was calculated but for some reason is not plotted. May be you can ask a question related to matplotlib – Salvador Dali Jun 20 '17 at 16:54
  • @SalvadorDali A question following this one would be then, when is one more preferred than the other? It seems to me that truncated_normal is more often than not the preferred option. When is random_normal a valid choice? – Carlos Jimenez Bermudez Jun 26 '17 at 14:57
  • 5
    @CarlosJimenezBermudez it is hard to predict which initialization will lead to the fastest learning. random_normal might be used with RELU activations. The reason for not-using random_normal is saturations for sigmoid/tanh, but they are not frequently used now. – Salvador Dali Jun 26 '17 at 19:31

tf.truncated_normal() selects random numbers from a normal distribution whose mean is close to 0 and values are close to 0 Ex. -0.1 to 0.1. It's called truncated because your cutting off the tails from a normal distribution.

tf.random_normal() selects random numbers from a normal distribution whose mean is close to 0; however the values can be a bit further apart. Ex. -2 to 2

In practice (Machine Learning) you usually want your weights to be close to 0.

  • In ML, the usual suggestion is that weights have a mean of 0, standard deviation of 0.1 or 0.01, be close to 0 and have a uniform distribution. Can you tell exactly why ? – pravbeatle May 24 '17 at 12:34
  • @pravbeatle I believe this post can help you, cs231n.github.io/neural-networks-2. Those values are preferred because the network will train faster. – ksooklall May 24 '17 at 18:58
  • @pravbeatle another explanation of weight saturation for sigmoid link: stats.stackexchange.com/questions/228670/… – weiheng Dec 8 '17 at 12:10

The API documentation for tf.truncated_normal() describes the function as:

Outputs random values from a truncated normal distribution.

The generated values follow a normal distribution with specified mean and standard deviation, except that values whose magnitude is more than 2 standard deviations from the mean are dropped and re-picked.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.