78

I have the following TypeScript interface:

interface SelectProps {
    options: Option[];
    value: string[];
    onChange: (value: string[]) => void;
}

I want to add boolean called isMultiple that will change the types of the other properties.

When isMultiple=true

  • enforce value:string[]
  • enforce onChange: (value: string[]) => void;

When isMultiple=false

  • enforce value:string
  • enforce onChange: (value: string) => void;

Is it possible to dynamically set the type of other properties based on the value of one property?

4 Answers 4

95

It's a bit late but I hope it helps others like it helped me.

Discriminated unions, also known as tagged unions or algebraic data types can be used to solve this problem.

interface MultipleSelectProps {
    isMultiple: true;
    options: string[];
    value: string[];
    onChange: (value: string[]) => void;
}

interface SingleSelectProps {
    isMultiple: false;
    options: string[];
    value: string;
    onChange: (value: string) => void;
}

type SelectProps = MultipleSelectProps | SingleSelectProps;

Usage example:

function Select(props: SelectProps) {
    if (props.isMultiple) {
        const { value, onChange } = props;
        onChange(value);
    } else if (props.isMultiple === false) {
        const { value, onChange } = props;
        onChange(value);
    }
}

Note: When isMultiple is undefined or null it is not possible to infer the specific type of SelectProps. In these cases is necessary to do a strict comparison isMultiple === false.

Source: https://blog.mariusschulz.com/2016/11/03/typescript-2-0-tagged-union-types

7
  • This seems to work for the calling code but the function that accepts the SelectProps seems to not be able to differentiate the onChange call. See this code for an example.
    – styfle
    Nov 17, 2017 at 15:04
  • That is because is multiple can be undefined or null. In those cases it is no possible to infer the specific type of SelectProps. Full answer here
    – Tito Nobre
    Nov 17, 2017 at 16:27
  • Wonderful! If you update your answer with the usage function Select(props: SelectProps) then I will mark as the correct answer!
    – styfle
    Nov 17, 2017 at 18:21
  • Is there any way to type check onChange value argument as one of options? So the onChange callback could also be validated against correct values? I guess options couldn't be dynamic in this case?
    – zanona
    May 25, 2020 at 10:00
  • I guess I did not understood this last question. Can you provide an example?
    – Tito Nobre
    May 27, 2020 at 3:04
41

UPDATE

Actually it can be done easier, all that is required here is using union type like this:

type SelectProps = {
      isMultiple: true;
      options: string[];
      value: string[];
      onChange: (value: string[]) => void;
    } : {
      isMultiple: false;
      options: string[];
      value: string;
      onChange: (value: string) => void;
    }

You can make use of typescript Distributive Conditional Types https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/2/conditional-types.html

So your type will look like this:

type SelectProps<TMultiple = boolean> = TMultiple extends true
  ? {
      isMultiple: TMultiple;
      options: string[];
      value: string[];
      onChange: (value: string[]) => void;
    }
  : {
      isMultiple: TMultiple;
      options: string[];
      value: string;
      onChange: (value: string) => void;
    };

Here is a quick example: https://stackblitz.com/edit/typescript-9jgvys

5
  • 2
    This should be the accepted answer.
    – Tim
    Jan 25, 2022 at 19:34
  • Can I achieve something similar if "TMultiple" is a value within an Union? I mean, if the value of "isMultiple" matches '1' | '2' or not Jan 16, 2023 at 1:22
  • 1
    Yes, I updated the answer btw and all you need to do is to set values '1' or '2' instead of isMultiple true/false
    – Cris
    Jan 16, 2023 at 15:35
  • Really cool! Didn't know about these conditional types. Is there any big difference between that and an union? May 5, 2023 at 14:09
  • 1
    The "union type" is wrong in the updated example code. Currently it is as ":", but I think the correct is "|".
    – mtbossa
    May 30, 2023 at 13:19
1

I like the @Cris response.
I just refactored it in a different way to simplify it and also corrected the union symbol (: => |)

type SelectProps<TMultiple = boolean, T = TMultiple extends true ? string[] : string> = {
      isMultiple: TMultiple;
      options: string[];
      value: T;
      onChange: (value: T) => void;
};
-4

No, you can't do that, but here are two alternatives

(1) Use union types for value and onChange:

interface SelectProps {
    options: Option[];
    isMultiple: boolean;
    value: string | string[];
    onChange: (value: string | string[]) => void;
}

(2) Use two different interfaces for the two cases:

interface SelectProps {
    options: Option[];
    isMultiple: boolean;
}

interface SingleSelectProps extends SelectProps {
    value: string;
    onChange: (value: string) => void;
}

interface MultipleSelectProps extends SelectProps {
    value: string[];
    onChange: (value: string[]) => void;
}

function isSingle(props: SelectProps): props is SingleSelectProps {
    return !props.isMultiple;
}

function isMultiple(props: SelectProps): props is MultipleSelectProps {
    return props.isMultiple;
}

(code in playground)

2
  • 3
    An issue with the first approach is that value could be string and onChange could be (value: string[]) => void Nov 14, 2018 at 14:23
  • @AntonyO'Neill Yeah, you're right. The solution in the other (accepted) answer is better. Nov 14, 2018 at 14:25

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