Good news is that I followed the official tutorial on accessing Google Drive REST API over Javascript and it worked. However, client_id but not client_secret is used in the code.

/**
* Check if current user has authorized this application.
*/
function checkAuth() {
 gapi.auth.authorize(
   {
     'client_id': CLIENT_ID,
     'scope': SCOPES.join(' '),
     'immediate': true
   }, handleAuthResult);
}

While registering the app, I have been given a client_secret which has never been used. Should't client_secret be sent out in the auth_token request as explained here and here?

As mentioned in a comment below, I perfectly understand that client_id is public as opposed to client_secret. What surprises me is, how Google's OAuth 2.0 works in spite of not using client_secret to obtain auth_token. Isn't that mandated by OAuth 2.0 specification? What is preventing a malicious app to impersonate a legitimate one?

I can set localhost:8000 as my Javascript origin.

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Both client id and client secret are used to identify your application. Client id is public information and is ok to show to users. While secret must be kept secret or anyone could potently use your application credentials.

JavaScript is client side so if you view source on the page you can see the client id. If your code also included the secret then they would see that as well and be able to use it.

I suspect that this is the reason we need to use JavaScript orign it adds an extra layer of security instead of using the secret in JavaScript applications.

RFC6749

The authorization server issues the registered client a client identifier -- a unique string representing the registration information provided by the client. The client identifier is not a secret; it is exposed to the resource owner and MUST NOT be used alone for client authentication. The client identifier is unique to the authorization server.

English: Google developer console registers the application (client) creating a unique string to identifying that client (project). The client id is not a secrete and should be shown to the owner of the data.

4.1. Authorization Code Grant Client secrete is not a required part of the authorization code exchange as far as I can see.

  • I understand that client_id is public as opposed to client_secret. What surprises me is, how Google's OAuth 2.0 works in spite of not using client_secret to obtain auth_token. Isn't that mandated by OAuth 2.0 specification? – Holmes.Sherlock Jan 18 '17 at 9:24
  • What is preventing a malicious app to impersonate a legitimate one? – Holmes.Sherlock Jan 18 '17 at 9:25
  • Probably some magic inside the JS library would be my guess. That and the fact that its locked the JavaScript origin and redirect URIs. Unless the calls are coming from a location you supplied its not going to work. – DaImTo Jan 18 '17 at 9:26
  • 1
    I rule out the "magic" part. Security by obscurity will probably never be accepted by the community. A leader will never fall into such trap. 'Location' might be 'the' thing. – Holmes.Sherlock Jan 18 '17 at 9:28
  • 1
    It's the restricted origin address (not redirect uri, since there isn't one) that protects your app. In a genuine browser, the Google auth will fail if the app was served from anywhere other than your server. In order to have a malicious app impersonate your app, you would need to persuade the user to run the app using a hacked browser that faked the origin address. Moreover, that user would need to have logged in to his Google account. So there is a risk, but it's minimal. If you haf that level of control, the user is already screwed. – pinoyyid Jan 18 '17 at 20:45

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