206

Through a little typo, I accidentally found this construct:

int main(void) {
    char foo = 'c';

    switch(foo)
    {
        printf("Cant Touch This\n");   // This line is Unreachable

        case 'a': printf("A\n"); break;
        case 'b': printf("B\n"); break;
        case 'c': printf("C\n"); break;
        case 'd': printf("D\n"); break;
    }

    return 0;
}

It seems that the printf at the top of the switch statement is valid, but also completely unreachable.

I got a clean compile, without even a warning about unreachable code, but this seems pointless.

Should a compiler flag this as unreachable code?
Does this serve any purpose at all?

  • 51
    GCC has a special flag for this. It's -Wswitch-unreachable – Eli Sadoff Jan 18 '17 at 19:08
  • 57
    "Does this serve any purpose at all?" Well, you can goto in and out of the otherwise unreachable part, which may be useful for various hacks. – HolyBlackCat Jan 18 '17 at 19:09
  • 12
    @HolyBlackCat Wouldn't that be such for all unreachable code? – Eli Sadoff Jan 18 '17 at 19:10
  • 28
    @EliSadoff Indeed. I guess it doesn't serve any special purpose. I bet it is allowed just because there is no reason to forbid it. After all, switch is just a conditional goto with multiple labels. There are more or less same restrictions on it's body as you would have on a regular block of code filled with goto labels. – HolyBlackCat Jan 18 '17 at 19:14
  • 16
    Worth pointing out that @MooingDuck s example is a variant on Duff's device (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duff's_device) – Michael Anderson Jan 19 '17 at 2:14
225

Perhaps not the most useful, but not completely worthless. You may use it to declare a local variable available within switch scope.

switch (foo)
{
    int i;
case 0:
    i = 0;
    //....
case 1:
    i = 1;
    //....
}

The standard (N1579 6.8.4.2/7) has the following sample:

EXAMPLE    In the artificial program fragment

switch (expr)
{
    int i = 4;
    f(i);
case 0:
    i = 17;
    /* falls through into default code */
default:
    printf("%d\n", i);
}

the object whose identifier is i exists with automatic storage duration (within the block) but is never initialized, and thus if the controlling expression has a nonzero value, the call to the printf function will access an indeterminate value. Similarly, the call to the function f cannot be reached.

P.S. BTW, the sample is not valid C++ code. In that case (N4140 6.7/3, emphasis mine):

A program that jumps90 from a point where a variable with automatic storage duration is not in scope to a point where it is in scope is ill-formed unless the variable has scalar type, class type with a trivial default constructor and a trivial destructor, a cv-qualified version of one of these types, or an array of one of the preceding types and is declared without an initializer (8.5).


90) The transfer from the condition of a switch statement to a case label is considered a jump in this respect.

So replacing int i = 4; with int i; makes it a valid C++.

  • 3
    "... but is never initialized ..." Looks like i is initialized to 4, what am I missing? – yano Jan 18 '17 at 19:24
  • 7
    Note that if the variable is static, it will be initialized to zero, so there's a safe usage for this as well. – Leushenko Jan 18 '17 at 19:29
  • 23
    @yano We always jump over the i = 4;initialization, so it never takes place. – AlexD Jan 18 '17 at 19:32
  • 12
    Hah of course! ... whole point of the question ... geez. The desire is strong to delete this stupidity – yano Jan 18 '17 at 19:35
  • 1
    Nice! Sometimes I needed a temp variable inside a case, and always had to use different names in each case or define it outside the switch. – SJuan76 Jan 19 '17 at 13:08
98

Does this serve any purpose at all?

Yes. If instead of a statement, you put a declaration before the first label, this can make perfect sense:

switch (a) {
  int i;
case 0:
  i = f(); g(); h(i);
  break;
case 1:
  i = g(); f(); h(i);
  break;
}

The rules for declarations and statements are shared for blocks in general, so it's the same rule that allows that that also allows statements there.


Worth mentioning as well is also that if the first statement is a loop construct, case labels may appear in the loop body:

switch (i) {
  for (;;) {
    f();
  case 1:
    g();
  case 2:
    if (h()) break;
  }
}

Please don't write code like this if there is a more readable way of writing it, but it's perfectly valid, and the f() call is reachable.

  • @MatthieuM Duff's Device does have case labels inside a loop, but starts with a case label before the loop. – user743382 Jan 19 '17 at 15:38
  • 2
    I'm not sure if I should upvote for the interesting example or downvote for the utter madness of writing this in a real program :). Congrats for diving into the abyss and returning back in one piece. – Liviu T. Jan 19 '17 at 23:44
  • @ChemicalEngineer: If the code is part of a loop, as it is in Duff's Device, { /*code*/ switch(x) { } } may look cleaner but it is also wrong. – Ben Voigt Jan 20 '17 at 16:56
39

There is a famous use of this called Duff's Device.

int n = (count+3)/4;
switch (count % 4) {
  do {
    case 0: *to = *from++;
    case 3: *to = *from++;
    case 2: *to = *from++;
    case 1: *to = *from++;
  } while (--n > 0);
}

Here we copy a buffer pointed to by from to a buffer pointed to by to. We copy count instances of data.

The do{}while() statement starts before the first case label, and the case labels are embedded within the do{}while().

This reduces the number of conditional branches at the end of the do{}while() loop encountered by roughly a factor of 4 (in this example; the constant can be tweaked to whatever value you want).

Now, optimizers can sometimes do this for you (especially if they are optimizing streaming/vectorized instructions), but without profile guided optimization they cannot know if you expect the loop to be large or not.

In general, variable declarations can occur there and be used in every case, but be out of scope after the switch ends. (note any initialization will be skipped)

In addition, control flow that isn't switch-specific can get you into that section of the switch block, as illustrated above, or with a goto.

  • 2
    Of course, this would still be possible without allowing statements above the first case, as the order of do { and case 0: don't matter, both serve to place a jump target on the first *to = *from++;. – Ben Voigt Jan 20 '17 at 16:58
  • 1
    @BenVoigt I'd argue that putting the do { is more readable. Yes, arguing about readability for Duff's Device is stupid and pointless and likely a simple way to go mad. – Nic Hartley Jan 20 '17 at 20:31
  • 1
    @QPaysTaxes You should check out Simon Tatham’s Coroutines in C. Or maybe not. – Jonas Schäfer Jan 23 '17 at 6:33
  • @JonasSchäfer Amusingly, that is basically what C++20 coroutines are going to do for you. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Apr 28 at 15:46
15

Assuming you are using gcc on Linux, it would have given you a warning if you're using 4.4 or earlier version.

The -Wunreachable-code option was removed in gcc 4.4 onward.

  • Having experienced the issue first hand always helps! – 16tons Jan 18 '17 at 19:13
  • @JonathanLeffler: The general issue of gcc warnings being susceptible to the particular set of optimization passes selected is still true, unfortunately, and makes for a poor user experience. It's really annoying to have a clean Debug build followed by a failing Release build :/ – Matthieu M. Jan 19 '17 at 19:38
  • @MatthieuM.: It would seem that such a warning would be extremely easy to detect in cases involving grammatical rather than semantic analysis [e.g. code follows an "if" which has returns in both branches], and make it easier to stifle "annoyance" warnings. On the other hand, there are some cases where it's useful to have errors or warning in release builds that aren't in debug builds (if nothing else, in places where a hack which is put in for debugging is supposed to be cleaned up for release). – supercat Jan 20 '17 at 15:18
  • 1
    @MatthieuM.: If significant semantic analysis would be required to discover that a certain variable will always be false at some spot in the code, code which is conditional upon that variable being true would be found to be unreachable only if such analysis were performed. On the other hand, I would consider a notice that such code was unreachable rather differently from a warning about syntactically-unreachable code, since it should be entirely normal to have various conditions be possible with some project configurations but not others. It may at times be helpful for programmers... – supercat Jan 20 '17 at 15:50
  • 1
    ...to know why some configurations generate larger code than others [e.g. because a compiler could regard some condition as impossible in one configuration but not another] but that doesn't mean that there's anything "wrong" with code which could be optimized in that fashion with some configurations. – supercat Jan 20 '17 at 15:57
11

Not only for variable declaration but advanced jumping as well. You can utilize it well if and only if you're not prone to spaghetti code.

int main()
{
    int i = 1;
    switch(i)
    {
        nocase:
        printf("no case\n");

        case 0: printf("0\n"); break;
        case 1: printf("1\n"); goto nocase;
    }
    return 0;
}

Prints

1
no case
0 /* Notice how "0" prints even though i = 1 */

It should be noted that switch-case is one of the fastest control flow clauses. So it must be very flexible to the programmer, which sometimes involves cases like this.

  • And what is difference between nocase: and default:? – i486 Jan 20 '17 at 10:45
  • @i486 Wheni=4 it does not trigger nocase. – Sanchke Dellowar Jan 20 '17 at 14:14
  • 1
    @njzk2 I'm a man who likes his gotos. Deal with it B-\ – Sanchke Dellowar Jan 20 '17 at 14:15
  • @SanchkeDellowar that's what I mean. – njzk2 Jan 20 '17 at 15:03
  • Why the heck would one do that instead of simply putting case 1 before case 0 and using fallthrough? – Jonas Schäfer Jan 23 '17 at 6:37
11

It should be noted, that there are virtually no structural restrictions on the code within the switch statement, or on where the case *: labels are placed within this code*. This makes programming tricks like duff's device possible, one possible implementation of which looks like this:

int n = ...;
int iterations = n/8;
switch(n%8) {
    while(iterations--) {
        sum += *ptr++;
        case 7: sum += *ptr++;
        case 6: sum += *ptr++;
        case 5: sum += *ptr++;
        case 4: sum += *ptr++;
        case 3: sum += *ptr++;
        case 2: sum += *ptr++;
        case 1: sum += *ptr++;
        case 0: ;
    }
}

You see, the code between the switch(n%8) { and the case 7: label is definitely reachable...


* As supercat thankfully pointed out in a comment: Since C99, neither a goto nor a label (be it a case *: label or not) may appear within the scope of a declaration that contains a VLA declaration. So it's not correct to say that there are no structural restrictions on the placement of the case *: labels. However, duff's device predates the C99 standard, and it does not depend on VLA's anyway. Nevertheless, I felt compelled to insert a "virtually" into my first sentence due to this.

  • The addition of variable-length arrays led to the imposition of structural restrictions related to them. – supercat Jan 20 '17 at 0:09
  • @supercat What kind of restrictions? – cmaster Jan 20 '17 at 9:51
  • 1
    Neither a goto nor switch/case/default label may appear within the scope of any variably-declared object or type. This effectively means that if a block contains any declarations of variable-length-array objects or types, any labels must precede those declarations. There's a confusing bit of verbiage in the Standard which would suggest that in some cases the scope of a VLA declaration extends to the entirety of a switch statement; see stackoverflow.com/questions/41752072/… for my question on that. – supercat Jan 20 '17 at 14:54
  • @supercat: You just misunderstood that verbiage (which I presume is why you deleted your question). It imposes a requirement on the scope in which a VLA may be defined. It doesn't extend that scope, it just makes certain VLA definitions invalid. – Keith Thompson Feb 1 '17 at 18:53
  • @KeithThompson: Yeah, I had misunderstood it. The weird use of the present tense in the footnote made things confusing, and I think the concept could have been better expressed as a prohibition: "A switch statement whose body contains a VLA declaration within it shall not include any switch or case labels within the scope of that VLA declaration". – supercat Feb 1 '17 at 19:26
10

You got your answer related to the required gcc option -Wswitch-unreachable to generate the warning, this answer is to elaborate on the usability / worthyness part.

Quoting straight out of C11, chapter §6.8.4.2, (emphasis mine)

switch (expr)
{
int i = 4;
f(i);
case 0:
i = 17;
/* falls through into default code */
default:
printf("%d\n", i);
}

the object whose identifier is i exists with automatic storage duration (within the block) but is never initialized, and thus if the controlling expression has a nonzero value, the call to the printf function will access an indeterminate value. Similarly, the call to the function f cannot be reached.

Which is very self-explanatory. You can use this to define a locally scoped variable which is available only within the switch statement scope.

9

It is possible to implement a "loop and a half" with it, although it might not be the best way to do it:

char password[100];
switch(0) do
{
  printf("Invalid password, try again.\n");
default:
  read_password(password, sizeof(password));
} while (!is_valid_password(password));
  • @RichardII Is it a pun or what? Please explain. – Dancia Jan 20 '17 at 12:07
  • 1
    @Dancia He's saying that this is pretty clearly not the best way to do something like this, and "might not" is something of an understatement. – Nic Hartley Jan 20 '17 at 20:32

protected by Sheldore Jul 19 at 12:17

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