Without referring to a book, can anyone please provide a good explanation for CRTP with a code example?

  • 2
    Read CRTP questions on SO: stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/crtp. That might give you some idea. – sbi Nov 13 '10 at 15:41
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    @sbi: If he does that, he'll find his own question. And that would be curiously recurring. :) – Craig McQueen Jan 8 '13 at 12:37
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    BTW, it seems to me the term should be "curiously recursing". Am I misunderstanding the meaning? – Craig McQueen Jan 8 '13 at 12:42
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    Craig: I think you are; it's "curiously recurring" in the sense that it was found to crop up in multiple contexts. – Gareth McCaughan Apr 20 '16 at 15:54
up vote 238 down vote accepted

In short, CRTP is when a class A has a base class which is a template specialization for the class A itself. E.g.

template <class T> 
class X{...};
class A : public X<A> {...};

It is curiously recurring, isn't it? :)

Now, what does this give you? This actually gives the X template the ability to be a base class for its specializations.

For example, you could make a generic singleton class (simplified version) like this

template <class ActualClass> 
class Singleton
{
   public:
     static ActualClass& GetInstance()
     {
       if(p == nullptr)
         p = new ActualClass;
       return *p; 
     }

   protected:
     static ActualClass* p;
   private:
     Singleton(){}
     Singleton(Singleton const &);
     Singleton& operator = (Singleton const &); 
};
template <class T>
T* Singleton<T>::p = nullptr;

Now, in order to make an arbitrary class A a singleton you should do this

class A: public Singleton<A>
{
   //Rest of functionality for class A
};

So you see? The singleton template assumes that its specialization for any type X will be inherited from singleton<X> and thus will have all its(public, protected) members accessible, including the GetInstance! There are other useful uses of CRTP. For example, if you want to count all instances that currently exist for your class, but want to encapsulate this logic in a separate template (the idea for a concrete class is quite simple - have a static variable, increment in ctors, decrement in dtors). Try to do it as an excercise!

Yet another useful example, for boost(I am not sure how they have implemented it, but CRTP will do too). Imagine you want to provide only operator < for your classes but automatically operator == for them!

you could do it like this:

template<class Derived>
class Equality
{
};

template <class Derived>
bool operator == (Equality<Derived> const& op1, Equality<Derived> const & op2)
{
    Derived const& d1 = static_cast<Derived const&>(op1);//you assume this works     
    //because you know that the dynamic type will actually be your template parameter.
    //wonderful, isnit it?
    Derived const& d2 = static_cast<Derived const&>(op2); 
    return !(d1 < d2) && !(d2 < d1);//assuming derived has operator <
}

Now you can use it like this

struct Apple:public Equality<Apple> 
{
    int size;
};

bool operator < (Apple const & a1, Apple const& a2)
{
    return a1.size < a2.size;
}

now, you haven't provided explicitly operator == for apple? But you have it! You can write

int main()
{
    Apple a1;
    Apple a2; 

    a1.size = 10;
    a2.size = 10;
    if(a1 == a2) //the compiler won't complain! 
    {
    }
}

This could seem that you would write less if you just wrote operator == for Apple, but imagine that the Equality template would provide not only == but >, >=, <= etc. And you could use these definitions for multiple classes, reusing the code!

CRTP is a wonderful thing :) HTH

  • 7
    @DeadMG: Honestly, this answer was helpful in understanding the concept CRTP though singleton would not be the best choice of an example still the answer did serve the purpose.Since you downvoted I am hoping you would come up with a better answer/example & keeping the window open for you by not marking this as accepted answer. – Alok Save Nov 13 '10 at 16:41
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    + 1 best explanation I've ever seen – John Dibling Nov 13 '10 at 17:20
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    This post doesn't advocate singleton as a good programing pattern.it simply uses it as an illustration that can be commonly understood.imo the-1 is unwarranted – John Dibling Nov 13 '10 at 17:26
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    @John: You reversed your cell phone because it's too hard to use SO from it? :) – sbi Nov 14 '10 at 21:06
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    @Armen: The answer explains CRTP in a way that can be understood clearly, its a nice answer, thanks for such a nice answer. – Alok Save Nov 16 '10 at 15:02

Here you can see a great example. If you use virtual method the program will know what execute in runtime. Implementing CRTP the compiler is which decide in compile time!!! This is a great performance!

template <class T>
class Writer
{
  public:
    Writer()  { }
    ~Writer()  { }

    void write(const char* str) const
    {
      static_cast<const T*>(this)->writeImpl(str); //here the magic is!!!
    }
};


class FileWriter : public Writer<FileWriter>
{
  public:
    FileWriter(FILE* aFile) { mFile = aFile; }
    ~FileWriter() { fclose(mFile); }

    //here comes the implementation of the write method on the subclass
    void writeImpl(const char* str) const
    {
       fprintf(mFile, "%s\n", str);
    }

  private:
    FILE* mFile;
};


class ConsoleWriter : public Writer<ConsoleWriter>
{
  public:
    ConsoleWriter() { }
    ~ConsoleWriter() { }

    void writeImpl(const char* str) const
    {
      printf("%s\n", str);
    }
};
  • Couldn't you do this by defining virtual void write(const char* str) const = 0;? Though to be fair, this technique seems super helpful when write is doing other work. – atlex2 Aug 9 '16 at 14:44
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    Using a pure virtual method you are solving the inheritance in runtime instead of compile time. CRTP is used to solve this in compile time so the execution will be faster. – GutiMac Aug 10 '16 at 7:31

CRTP is a technique to implement compile-time polymorphism. Here's a very simple example. In the below example, ProcessFoo() is working with Base class interface and Base::Foo invokes the derived object's foo() method, which is what you aim to do with virtual methods.

http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/2d27f1e09d567d0e

template <typename T>
struct Base {
  void foo() {
    (static_cast<T*>(this))->foo();
  }
};

struct Derived : public Base<Derived> {
  void foo() {
    cout << "derived foo" << endl;
  }
};

struct AnotherDerived : public Base<AnotherDerived> {
  void foo() {
    cout << "AnotherDerived foo" << endl;
  }
};

template<typename T>
void ProcessFoo(Base<T>* b) {
  b->foo();
}


int main()
{
    Derived d1;
    AnotherDerived d2;
    ProcessFoo(&d1);
    ProcessFoo(&d2);
    return 0;
}

Output:

derived foo
AnotherDerived foo
  • 1
    It might also be worth it in this example to add an example of how to implement a default foo() in the Base class that will be called if no Derived has implemented it. AKA change foo in the Base to some other name(e.g. caller()), add a new function foo() to the Base that cout's "Base". Then call caller() inside of ProcessFoo – wizurd Apr 11 at 15:15
  • @wizurd This example is more to illustrate a pure virtual base class function i.e. we enforce that foo() is implemented by the derived class. – blueskin Jun 4 at 17:01
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    This is my favourite answer, since it also shows why this pattern is useful with the ProcessFoo() function. – Pietro Sep 11 at 17:21

Just as note:

CRTP could be used to implement static polymorphism(which like dynamic polymorphism but without virtual function pointer table).

#pragma once
#include <iostream>
template <typename T>
class Base
{
    public:
        void method() {
            static_cast<T*>(this)->method();
        }
};

class Derived1 : public Base<Derived1>
{
    public:
        void method() {
            std::cout << "Derived1 method" << std::endl;
        }
};


class Derived2 : public Base<Derived2>
{
    public:
        void method() {
            std::cout << "Derived2 method" << std::endl;
        }
};


#include "crtp.h"
int main()
{
    Derived1 d1;
    Derived2 d2;
    d1.method();
    d2.method();
    return 0;
}

The output would be :

Derived1 method
Derived2 method
  • 1
    sorry my bad, static_cast takes care of the change. If you want to see the corner case anyway even though it does not cause error see here: ideone.com/LPkktf – odinthenerd Dec 6 '13 at 9:01
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    Bad example. This code could be done with no vtables without using CRTP. What vtables truly provide is using the base class (pointer or reference) to call derived methods. You should show how it is done with CRTP here. – Etherealone Feb 6 '14 at 17:37
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    In your example, Base<>::method () isn't even called, nor do you use polymorphism anywhere. – MikeMB Mar 12 '15 at 9:14
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    @Jichao, according to @MikeMB 's note, you should call methodImpl in the method of Base and in derived classes name methodImpl instead of method – Ivan Kush Sep 17 '16 at 17:20
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    if you use similar method() then its statically bound and you don't need the common base class. Because anyway you couldn't use it polymorphically through base class pointer or ref. So the code should look like this: #include <iostream> template <typename T> struct Writer { void write() { static_cast<T*>(this)->writeImpl(); } }; struct Derived1 : public Writer<Derived1> { void writeImpl() { std::cout << "D1"; } }; struct Derived2 : public Writer<Derived2> { void writeImpl() { std::cout << "DER2"; } }; – barney Jun 2 '17 at 20:02

This is not a direct answer, but rather an example of how CRTP can be useful.


A good concrete example of CRTP is std::enable_shared_from_this from C++11:

[util.smartptr.enab]/1

A class T can inherit from enable_­shared_­from_­this<T> to inherit the shared_­from_­this member functions that obtain a shared_­ptr instance pointing to *this.

That is, inheriting from std::enable_shared_from_this makes it possible to get a shared (or weak) pointer to your instance without access to it (e.g. from a member function where you only know about *this).

It's useful when you need to give a std::shared_ptr but you only have access to *this:

struct Node;

void process_node(const std::shared_ptr<Node> &);

struct Node : std::enable_shared_from_this<Node> // CRTP
{
    std::weak_ptr<Node> parent;
    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Node>> children;

    void add_child(std::shared_ptr<Node> child)
    {
        process_node(shared_from_this()); // Shouldn't pass `this` directly.
        child->parent = weak_from_this(); // Ditto.
        children.push_back(std::move(child));
    }
};

The reason you can't just pass this directly instead of shared_from_this() is that it would break the ownership mechanism:

struct S
{
    std::shared_ptr<S> get_shared() const { return std::shared_ptr<S>(this); }
};

// Both shared_ptr think they're the only owner of S.
// This invokes UB (double-free).
std::shared_ptr<S> s1 = std::make_shared<S>();
std::shared_ptr<S> s2 = s1->get_shared();
assert(s2.use_count() == 1);

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