28

Suppose I have a function named caller, which will call a function named callee:

void caller()
{
    callee();
}  

Now caller might be called many times in the application, and you want to make sure callee is only called once. (kind of lazy initialization), you could implement it use a flag:

void caller()
{
    static bool bFirst = true;
    if(bFirst)
    {
        callee();
        bFirst = false;
    }
}

My opinion for this is it needs more code, and it needs one more check in every call of function caller.
A better solution to me is as follow: (suppose callee returns int)

void caller()
{
    static int ret = callee();
}  

But this can't handle the case if callee returns void, my solution is using the comma expression:

void caller()
{
    static int ret = (callee(), 1);
}  

But the problem with this is that comma expression is not popular used and people may get confused when see this line of code, thus cause problems for maintainance.

Do you have any good idea to make sure a function is only called once?

7
  • I'd opt to using a flag - just make sure you don't use idiotic Hungarian notation. :) (overhead of evaluating a boolean is smaller than the overhead of calling a function, anyway)
    – eq-
    Commented Nov 13, 2010 at 16:06
  • @eq All cases I listed already make sure the functions is only called once Commented Nov 13, 2010 at 16:09
  • 1
    You could rename ret to call_once (also when an int is returned).
    – Peter G.
    Commented Nov 13, 2010 at 16:11
  • Can't you put this check in callee?
    – ruslik
    Commented Nov 13, 2010 at 16:14
  • @ruslik I was intending to avoid the check:) Commented Nov 13, 2010 at 16:18

5 Answers 5

19

You could use this:

void caller()
{
    static class Once { public: Once(){callee();}} Once_;
}
3
  • Yea, a creative idea, but do you guys think it is better than comma expression? which one would you choose if you want to use in your code? Commented Nov 13, 2010 at 16:25
  • No, it is not thread-safe, but neither are the alternatives in the question. And I would probably use a simple if statement like in the first alternative in the question. See the answer of AndreyT
    – wimh
    Commented Nov 13, 2010 at 18:06
  • 5
    @StackedCrooked: not thread-safe in C++03, thread-safe in C++0x. Commented Nov 13, 2010 at 18:16
13

Thread-safe:

    static boost::once_flag flag = BOOST_ONCE_INIT;
    boost::call_once([]{callee();}, flag);  
5
  • I asume the first line has to put outside the function?
    – wimh
    Commented Nov 13, 2010 at 18:04
  • 2
    No, it can be inside the function since it is static.
    – ronag
    Commented Nov 13, 2010 at 18:46
  • What is the #include ??
    – mr5
    Commented Dec 13, 2013 at 2:33
  • 3
    just want to add that std::call_once is now available as of c++11 and should be used instead of boost::call_once. The only difference in usage is that the flag does not need to be initialized (just default constructed)
    – evan
    Commented Sep 28, 2016 at 21:31
  • 2
    from c++11 you can use en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/thread/call_once
    – Vencat
    Commented Jun 14, 2021 at 21:24
7

You could hide the function through a function pointer.

static void real_function()
{
  //do stuff

  function = noop_function;
}


static void noop_function()
{

}

int (*function)(void) = real_function;

Callers just call the function which will do the work the first time, and do nothing on any subsequent calls.

2
  • 1
    Good answer, +1, but the use of the static keyword is deprecated in general C++ (in this context, of course, not in classes) and unnecessary in this particular case. Also note that your example won't compile - there's a redundant bracket in your function pointer declaration (definition, actually :) Commented Nov 13, 2010 at 16:18
  • 4
    @ArmenTsirunyan Of course, static was quickly un-deprecated before C++11 was finalised, once they woke up and realised it is perfectly fine. Commented Jul 11, 2016 at 21:07
2

Your first variant with a boolean flag bFirst is nothing else that an explict manual implementatuion of what the compiler will do for you implictly in your other variants.

In other words, in a typical implementation in all of the variants you pesented so far there will be an additional check for a boolean flag in the generated machine code. The perfromance of all these variants will be the same (if that's your concern). The extra code in the first variant might look less elegant, but that doesn't seem to be a big deal to me. (Wrap it.)

Anyway, what you have as your first variant is basically how it is normally done (until you start dealing with such issues as multithreading etc.)

2
  • You bring up an very interesting point, let me check it tomorrow with assembly Commented Nov 13, 2010 at 16:39
  • yea, that is what compiler does to add an underlying check! Commented Nov 15, 2010 at 5:42
0

Inspired by some people, I think just use a macro to wrap comma expression would also make the intention clear:

#define CALL_ONCE(func) do {static bool dummy = (func, true);} while(0)
2
  • 2
    There is no function call in you code, how will the function be called?
    – this
    Commented Mar 23, 2014 at 23:57
  • 1
    and even if you had included the missing function call operator, this dummy bool would be shared by/only instantiable once within the entire nesting function, making it and hence the ability to call any function non-reusable for CALL_ONCE, so why define a macro if it's not reusable...? Commented Jul 11, 2016 at 21:14

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