-2

For input 1234 the output is 134.What is happening here?When i print a[1] in this case it prints nothing.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    char a[100];
    cin >> a;
    a[1] = a[1] - '0';
    cout << a;
    return 0;
}
0
7

'0' refers to the printable character 0, which in ASCII translates to the value of 48. '2' has a value of 50, so subtracting 50 from 48 yields 2, which is Start of Text character. This character doesn't translate into a printable character, so cout doesn't print it.

2

When i print a1 in this case it prints nothing.

Refer to ASCII table, character '2' is 0x32, and character '0' is 0x30

a[1] = '2';  // a[1] is ASCII character 2

a[1] = a[1] - '0'; // a[1] now is 2 (numeric)

It doesn't print anything because ASCII code 2 is non-printable ASCII code.

1

The ASCII value of '0' is 48, here you are subtracting with a character and not a numeric number. And in your code you are subtracting '0' to the index 1 of char a[100] array so you get a[1] = 50 - 48 which is 2. 2 in Char is ETX (End of text) which cannot be represented in character so you get output of 134. Depends on your compiler how it treats the output. Some Compiler can output some Special Character.

1
  • This has nothing to do with subtracting ASCII values. C and C++ both require that the codes for '0' .. '9' are contiguous and increasing, so ch - '0' yields the value represented by any digit '0' .. '9', regardless of the character encoding that is in use. '2' - '0' is always 2. – Pete Becker Jan 19 '17 at 12:49
1

Its not 134

its 1+ (Special Character) +3 + 4

since 1234 is in character array

a[1] = 2 

in char becomes

a[1] = 50 // The Ascii equivalent to a[1]

'0' ascii value is 48

so

a[1] = 50 - 48

so a[1] become 2 which may or may not be printed onto screen.

0

when your input is 1234

a[1]='2'

when you subtract '0' form '2' you get 2 which is ascii for start of text so basically a[1]=start of text; which doesnot print anything on screen

therefore a=1 34

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