5

The following is a simple program that takes the macro TEST, pastes _NAME to the end of the token, and prints the result.

#define TEST 0
#define TEST_NAME "Joe"

#define ID_TO_NAME(id) id ## _NAME

int main(void) {
    printf("%s\n", ID_TO_NAME(TEST));
    return 0;
}

It works fine, however if I introduce a level of indirection, the preprocessor now uses the value of TEST instead of the token "TEST", resulting in the pasted token being 0_NAME instead of TEST_NAME.

#define TEST 0
#define TEST_NAME "Joe"

#define ID_TO_NAME(id) id ## _NAME

#define INDIRECTION(id) ID_TO_NAME(id)

int main(void) {
    printf("%s\n", INDIRECTION(TEST));
    return 0;
}

Is there any way to have it function like the first example (paste the token before expanding the macro) while keeping the indirection?

1
  • 1
    I was running into this problem a couple of years ago. I even drafted a question for SO. However, I concluded that within my terms of reference, it was not something that could be done in standard C — so the question died, unasked. I'm pretty sure the same applies to you, assuming that you need the TEST macro defined at the point where the INDIRECTION macro is used and that you can't build in knowledge about the possible value(s) of TEST (so there isn't a sane way to #undef TEST while using INDIRECTION and then reinstating the previous definition of TEST afterwards). Jan 19, 2017 at 7:30

2 Answers 2

5

You can forgo using "object-like" macros and give TEST an empty parameter list.

#define TEST() 0

Now TEST will never be replaced unless you actively put () after it.


You can add a bogus ## operator to every macro that passes the token without expanding it. However, this also requires a bogus parameter as well.

#define INDIRECTION(id,_) ID_TO_NAME(id##_)

    printf("%s\n", INDIRECTION(TEST,));
11
  • Can you see that the second argument is empty ? Jan 19, 2017 at 5:59
  • @Meninx-メネンックス Yes, that's the point. The parameter _ is bogus because it always must be empty. Jan 19, 2017 at 6:00
  • 1
    @Meninx-メネンックス - What I can see is that despite the indirection The program will print "Joe", like the OP wanted. Jan 19, 2017 at 6:46
  • 1
    @Meninx-メネンックス - I care that the OP receives a possible solution to their not easily solvable problem. Jan 19, 2017 at 6:57
  • 2
    @Meninx-メネンックス I'd be happy to address any objection, but please describe what you believe to be wrong and why, rather than repeating that you don't like it. Since OP already wrote that in the question, presumably it's not a viable solution. The key part is, if I introduce a level of indirection. Jan 19, 2017 at 7:06
0

The TEST macro has to be undefined so as to avoid expansion in INDIRECTION macro

#define TEST 0
#define TEST_NAME "Joe"

#define ID_TO_NAME(id) id##_NAME

#ifdef TEST
#undef TEST

#define INDIRECTION(id) ID_TO_NAME(id)

#endif
int main(void) {
    printf("%s\n", ID_TO_NAME(TEST));
    printf("%s\n", INDIRECTION(TEST));
    return 0;
}

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