69

In Java 8 new methods in Boolean class have been added.

Let's just talk about one of them

public static boolean Boolean.logicalOr(boolean a , boolean b)

Now, my question is, Why were they needed?

What's the difference between the following two cases.

boolean result = a || b; or Boolean result = Boolean.logicalOr(a,b);

What's so special about Boolean.logicalOr() and when should I prefer one over the other.

3
  • 14
    What does the javadoc say? Does it have a @see reference that might be helpful? Jan 19 '17 at 8:10
  • 4
    Functionally, they are identical, but please do not write Boolean.logicalOr(a,b) in your code. When you have multiple, functionally identical ways to write code, you should always choose the most readable.
    – VGR
    Jan 19 '17 at 15:22
  • There are already multiple good answers here. What I want to add doesn't justify a whole new answer. Using Boolean.logicalOr(a, b) instead of a || b reduces the number of branches that need to be unit-tested, increasing your testing code coverage. The drawback is that you usually should test all possibilities, and Boolean.logicalOr(a, b) won't force you to do so the way that a || b will. But if it's one of those situations where you're sure you don't need to test certain possibilities, Boolean.logicalOr can save you from writing pointless, ridiculous tests just for coverage. Jun 10 '20 at 13:45
96

Mainly those methods are there for your convenience and to make the code more readable by using the method references in lambdas/streams. Let's look at an example:

Stream.of(/* .. some objects .. */)
      .map(/* some function that returns a boolean */)
      .reduce(Boolean::logicalOr);

trying to write this with a || b:

Stream.of(...)
      .map(...)
      .reduce((a, b) -> a || b); // logicalOr is actually using ||

not that readable, right?

As Sotirios Delimanolis stated in the comment, you may also want to have a look at the javadoc and follow @see BinaryOperator. Or have a look at the function package summary javadoc.

7
  • 1
    | can also be logic or, just not short-circuiting.
    – shmosel
    Jan 19 '17 at 8:21
  • 1
    I guess that's clearer. Though there isn't really any difference since it's operating directly on its arguments.
    – shmosel
    Jan 19 '17 at 8:25
  • 2
    well it lose some kind of type checking... :P if we accidentally changed it to integer, | will still work without complaining, while || will not pass compilation Jan 19 '17 at 9:06
  • 1
    I already thought about a more complex example. If lots of || and && are written as functions, than .. in my opinion.. it is not as readable as method references. You then may need to doublecheck that you didn't overlook an ! ;-)
    – Roland
    Jan 19 '17 at 13:40
  • 1
    Note that the result of this code is an Optional<Boolean> because reduce returns an Optional -- it is empty in the case that the map was empty, so if you are looking to combine a bunch of booleans, like I was, you need to do a final .orElse(...) to specify what value to take in the empty set case. Feb 8 '19 at 18:57
52

It has to do with method references. Like this you can use the || (logical or) operator also in lambdas.

In this manner there also other new functions like Objects.isNull etc.

Using function references instead of a lambda expression like (a,b) -> a || b is more in line with streams and lambda 'look-and-feel'.
Also, a method reference will produce less byte code, and thus mean faster execution times (a bit at least).

6
  • 1
    BiConsumer doesn't return any value. Why don't you use BinaryOperator like in the documentation?
    – shmosel
    Jan 19 '17 at 8:22
  • 18
    It might be worth noting that because it's a method call, you lose the short-circuit behavior of ||.
    – Kevin
    Jan 19 '17 at 9:55
  • 8
    @Kevin: that’s only relevant if you call it directly, which isn’t the intended use case anyway (as this answer explains). If you create a function from it, there is no difference between Boolean::logicalOr and (a,b)->a||b, as evaluating a function always implies evaluation of all arguments before executing the code.
    – Holger
    Jan 19 '17 at 10:14
  • 6
    a method reference will produce less byte code, and thus mean faster execution times Smaller .class files, maybe; but once the byte code is compiled to assembly by JIT, the original byte code being larger or smaller means nothing re: speed of execution.
    – walen
    Jan 19 '17 at 15:42
  • 4
    @walen True; one needs to benchmark to determine execution speed. Sebastian, I'd encourage you to do this. My findings are that the explicit lambda is slightly faster than the method reference, but that boxing overhead dominates this difference compared to a simple stream reduction that uses ints instead of Booleans. Jan 19 '17 at 18:01
2

What's the difference between the following two cases.
boolean result = a || b; or Boolean result = Boolean.logicalOr(a,b);

I would like to put my points here regarding above question. Here is the body of Boolean.logicalOr

  public static boolean logicalOr(boolean paramBoolean1, boolean paramBoolean2)
  {
    return (paramBoolean1) || (paramBoolean2);
  }

So we can see that it's doing a || b ultimately. But it becomes non short circuit when we use Boolean.logicalOr instead of ||. Because it (Boolean.logicalOr) would be considered as (a || b) which is different from a || b when it comes with some other logical operators.
Example-: Please refer to the below code of snippet...

public static void main(String[] args) {

    boolean bCheck1 = false, bCheck2 = true, bCheck3 = false;
    System.out.println("bCheck1\t" + "bCheck2\t" + "bCheck3\t" + "checkOR-Result\t" + "checkLogicalOr-Result");

    bCheck1 = true; bCheck2 = true; bCheck3 = true;
    System.out.println(bCheck1 +"\t"+ bCheck2 +"\t"+ bCheck3 +"\t"+ checkOR(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3) + "\t\t" + checkLogicalOr(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3));
    bCheck1 = true; bCheck2 = true; bCheck3 = false;
    System.out.println(bCheck1 +"\t"+ bCheck2 +"\t"+ bCheck3 +"\t"+ checkOR(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3) + "\t\t" + checkLogicalOr(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3));
    bCheck1 = true; bCheck2 = false; bCheck3 = true;
    System.out.println(bCheck1 +"\t"+ bCheck2 +"\t"+ bCheck3 +"\t"+ checkOR(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3) + "\t\t" + checkLogicalOr(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3));
    bCheck1 = true; bCheck2 = false; bCheck3 = false;
    System.out.println(bCheck1 +"\t"+ bCheck2 +"\t"+ bCheck3 +"\t"+ checkOR(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3) + "\t\t" + checkLogicalOr(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3));
    bCheck1 = false; bCheck2 = true; bCheck3 = true;
    System.out.println(bCheck1 +"\t"+ bCheck2 +"\t"+ bCheck3 +"\t"+ checkOR(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3) + "\t\t" + checkLogicalOr(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3));
    bCheck1 = false; bCheck2 = true; bCheck3 = false;
    System.out.println(bCheck1 +"\t"+ bCheck2 +"\t"+ bCheck3 +"\t"+ checkOR(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3) + "\t\t" + checkLogicalOr(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3));
    bCheck1 = false; bCheck2 = false; bCheck3 = true;
    System.out.println(bCheck1 +"\t"+ bCheck2 +"\t"+ bCheck3 +"\t"+ checkOR(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3) + "\t\t" + checkLogicalOr(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3));
    bCheck1 = false; bCheck2 = false; bCheck3 = true;
    System.out.println(bCheck1 +"\t"+ bCheck2 +"\t"+ bCheck3 +"\t"+ checkOR(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3) + "\t\t" + checkLogicalOr(bCheck1, bCheck2, bCheck3));
}

private static boolean checkOR(boolean bCheck1, boolean bCheck2, boolean bCheck3){
    return bCheck1 && bCheck2 || bCheck3;
}

private static boolean checkLogicalOr(boolean bCheck1, boolean bCheck2, boolean bCheck3){
    return bCheck1 && Boolean.logicalOr(bCheck2, bCheck3);
}

Below are the results-:

bCheck1 bCheck2 bCheck3 checkOR-Result  checkLogicalOr-Result
true    true    true    true            true
true    true    false   true            true
true    false   true    true            true
true    false   false   false           false
false   true    true    true            false
false   true    false   false           false
false   false   true    true            false
false   false   true    true            false

We can see it's producing different results whenever it's been used with other logical operator. So one need to be cautious about using || over Boolean.logicalOr or vice versa. Obviously Boolean.logicalOr is more readable than ||. But each one is having their significance and can be used as below.
if(bCheck1 && bCheck2 || bCheck3) can't be replaced by if(bCheck1 && Boolean.logicalOr(bCheck2, bCheck3))
However replacing if(bCheck1 && (bCheck2 || bCheck3)) to if(bCheck1 && Boolean.logicalOr(bCheck2, bCheck3)) would definitely be a good idea.

3
  • 1
    Conditional operators execute left to right but if "()" is present then will take first precedence. So, the output of your code is absolutely right but it’s not related to above question. Please read this article to clarify introcs.cs.princeton.edu/java/11precedence .Machine will never give the wrong output :)
    – Joy
    Feb 7 '17 at 23:39
  • @Joy I understand the precedence of the operators. I have given my answers for What's so special about Boolean.logicalOr() and when should I prefer one over the other. & What's the difference between the following two cases.. I have given this very simple example considering any novice who doesn't understand precedence yet. It could be vain for veteran but it's definitely going to help any novice. Feb 8 '17 at 3:46
  • Too long of an answer just to say that adding a function call is equivalent to adding brackets. It should be shortened.
    – jmiserez
    Sep 25 '19 at 16:29

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