2

lets take a look at the following code snippet:

func / <T>(lhs: T?,rhs: T?) throws -> T? {
    switch (lhs,rhs) {
        case let (l?,r?):
            return try l/r
        default:
            return nil
    }
}

let x : Double? = 2
let y : Double? = 2

let z = try! x/y

I created a generic function that expects two optional parameters. If I run this code it leads to an endless loop because try l/r uses func / <T>(lhs: T?,rhs: T?) to divide the values. Can anyone explain why dividing two none optional double values results in a function call to the method I wrote and not the default / operator definition for Double?

If I extend Double by an extension that requires a static / operator for that class everything works like a charm:

protocol Dividable {
    static func /(lhs: Self, rhs: Self) -> Self
}

extension Double: Dividable {}

func / <T:Dividable>(lhs: T?,rhs: T?) throws -> T? {
    switch (lhs,rhs) {
        case let (l?,r?):
            return  l/r
        default:
            return nil
    }
}

let x : Double? = 2
let y : Double? = 2

let z = try! x/y
  • 3
    It probably leads to recursion due to the try in your return statement, since the built-in operators for / don't throw. Additionally, it looks like your operator doesn't throw either, so marking it throws doesn't really make a difference since it won't ever actually throw. – xoudini Jan 19 '17 at 10:09
  • @xoudiniI might just point out that reason speculated in the upvoted comment above is not true: you may mark calls non-throwing functions with try (and will be prompted with a warning is you do so), but this has no part in the overload resolution of the call. The reason why l/r fails to find the overload that the OP intends it to use is covered in the anwers below. The 2nd part of the comment above, however, is relevant (why throw?). – dfri Jan 19 '17 at 11:03
  • I thought about it like: dividing two Doubles could lead to an exception (divide with 0), so i need to mark l/r with try. So callers of that function know that it could fail .. – Sebastian Boldt Jan 19 '17 at 11:08
  • But as Joseph mentioned: The division will crash when the denominator is 0 and will not throw an error. So I basically was not sure about that. – Sebastian Boldt Jan 19 '17 at 11:09
  • 1
    @dfri Indeed, the first part of my comment was just speculation. Thanks for the thorough answer – the more you learn. – xoudini Jan 19 '17 at 14:14
1

Your function signature doesn't let the compiler know anything about the type of lhs and rhs, other than that they're the same type. For example you could call your method like this:

let str1 = "Left string"
let str2 = "Right string"
let result = try? str1 / str2

This will result in an infinite loop because the only method that the compiler knows called / that takes in 2 parameters of the same type (in this case String) is the one that you've declared; return try l/r will call your func / <T>(lhs: T?,rhs: T?) throws -> T? method over and over again.

As you mentioned in your question, you will need a protocol that your parameters must conform to. Unfortunately there is no existing Number or Dividable protocol that would fit your needs, so you'll have to make your own.

Note that division will crash when the denominator is 0 and will not throw an error, so you should be able to remove the throws keyword from your function so that it is:

func / <T:Dividable>(lhs: T?, rhs: T?) -> T?

Edit to clarify further

If you think about what the compiler knows at that point I think it makes more sense. Once inside the function all the compiler knows is that lhs and rhs are of type T and optional. It doesn't know what T is, or any of its properties or functions, but only that they're both of type T. Once you unwrap the values you still only know that both are of type T and non-optional. Even though you know that T (in this instance) is a Double, it could be a String (as per my example above). This would require the compiler to iterate over every possible class and struct to find something that supports your method signature (in this case func / (lhs: Double, rhs: Double) -> Double), which it simply can't do (in a reasonable time), and would lead to unpredictable code. Imagine if you added this global method and then every time / was used on something existing (such as Float(10) / Float(5)) your method was called, that would get pretty messy and confusing pretty quickly.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Okay,the throw part makes sense to me, but when I just remove "throw" from the function signature, without constraining T to some protocol, it also leads to an endless loop for some reason. It does not makes sense to me that calling "return = l/r" where l and r are plain Doubles (no optionals) will also result in a call to the function I wrote and not the public func /(lhs: Double, rhs: Double) -> Double from the Swift Implementation because my function expects two optionals T? and not just T. – Sebastian Boldt Jan 19 '17 at 11:14
  • 1
    I have added more of an explanation. Hopefully that helps a bit :) – Joseph Duffy Jan 19 '17 at 11:51
2

The binary arithmetic for e.g. Double is not implemented using concrete Double types, but rather as default generic implementations for types conforming to FloatingPoint:

Within the block of your custom / function, the compiler does not know that the typeholder T conforms to FloatingPoint, and the overload resolution of l/r will resolve to the method itself (since the FloatingPoint implementions, while being more specific, are not accessible to the more general non-constrained type T in your custom implementation).

You could workaround this by adding FloatingPoint as a type constraint also to your own custom method:

func /<T: FloatingPoint>(lhs: T?, rhs: T?) throws -> T? {
    switch (lhs, rhs) {
        case let (l?, r?):
            return try l/r
        default:
            return nil
    }
}

Likewise, the binary arithmetic for integer types are implemented as default generic implementations constrained to types conforming to the internal protocol _IntegerArithmetic, to which the public protocol IntegerArithmetic conforms.

You can use the latter public protocol to implement an overload of your custom operator function for integer types.

func /<T: IntegerArithmetic>(lhs: T?, rhs: T?) throws -> T? {
    switch (lhs, rhs) {
        case let (l?, r?):
            return try l/r
        default:
            return nil
    }
}

Finally, you might want to consider why you'd want this function to throw. N also ote that there are ways to simplify you implementations when dealing with exactly two optional values that you want to operate on only in case both differ from nil. E.g.:

func /<T: FloatingPoint>(lhs: T?, rhs: T?) -> T? {
    return lhs.flatMap { l in rhs.map{ l / $0 } }
}

func /<T: IntegerArithmetic>(lhs: T?, rhs: T?) -> T? {
    return lhs.flatMap { l in rhs.map{ l / $0 } }
}

Of, if you prefer semantics over brevity, wrap your switch statement in a single if statement

func /<T: FloatingPoint>(lhs: T?, rhs: T?) -> T? {
    if case let (l?, r?) = (lhs, rhs) {
        return l/r
    }
    return nil
}

func /<T: IntegerArithmetic>(lhs: T?, rhs: T?) -> T? {
    if case let (l?, r?) = (lhs, rhs) {
        return l/r
    }
    return nil
}
|improve this answer|||||

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