6

I have a generic class in F# with a single type parameter, and would like to create a static class containing factory methods. When I write my classes, the F# compiler generates an error related to a "type variable escaping its scope". My question is why the error is there and how to fix it.

I've created a minimum-size snippet demonstrating the issue:

type Foo<'a>(element : 'a) =

    member this.Copy () = Bar.Create(element)

and Bar =

    static member Create(element : 'a) = new Foo<'a>(element)

The mutual recursion in the types is there because I'd like the type Foo<'a> to be able to call the factory methods in the static class. The above snippet does not compile, and the error is: "Type inference caused the type variable a to escape its scope. Consider adding an explicit type parameter declaration or adjusting your code to be less generic." The error is registered as being located in the Create method of the Bar class. Unfortunately, I don't really understand the problem nor how to fix it. Any ideas?

Here's an additional observation. The snippet

type Foo<'a>(element : 'a) =

    member this.Element = element

and Bar =

    static member Create(element : 'a) = new Foo<'a>(element)

does compile. So the issue appears to be related to type inference made on the basis of the Copy() method of the Foo<'a> class. Furthermore, the snippet

type Foo<'a>(element : 'a) =

    member this.Copy () = Bar.Create(element)

and Bar =

    static member Create<'a>(element) = new Foo<'a>(element)

is a more C#-like version of the code (where the static method explicitly is made generic), which also does not compile, with the error "This code is not sufficiently generic. The type variable 'a could not be generalized because it would escape its scope."

6

Type inference for recursive members often requires type annotations on at least some of the definitions. However, sometimes you can avoid this by re-ordering definitions, as you can in at least your simplified repro:

type Bar = 
    static member Create(element) = Foo(element)
and Foo<'a>(element:'a) =
    member this.Copy() = Bar.Create(element)

(note that I've even removed the annotation on element in Bar.Create).

I don't know that there's an easy-to-understand explanation of exactly what annotations will be needed in any particular situation, unfortunately.

4

This seems to work without making Bar generic:

type Foo<'a>(element : 'a) =
    member this.Copy () = Bar.Create element
and Bar =
    static member Create<'a>(element : 'a) : Foo<'a> = Foo(element)

Online Demo

No idea why, just found through trial and error.

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    That's an odd one. Perhaps there's some interplay between the type variables on the Foo type and Create method here, since the result of Create is inferred to be a Foo<'a> without the annotation as well. Can't believe it's expected to work that way. – scrwtp Jan 19 '17 at 16:57
2

I'm actually seeing a different error, about type variable 'a being unsolved, and I can get around it by parameterizing Bar with 'a:

type Foo<'a>(element : 'a) =
    member this.Copy () = Bar.Create(element)

and Bar<'a> =
    static member Create(element : 'a) = new Foo<'a>(element)

I'm afraid I don't have a very good explanation why this is required in the scenario where you have mutually recursive types, and not when you have a separate Bar type.

I tend to avoid mutually recursive types - situations where you can't do without them are rare. Most of the time you can restructure the code to avoid recursion, and usually end up with something that's easier to read and refactor if necessary.

  • 2
    Agreed on the comment about keeping mutually recursive types at bay. – Anton Schwaighofer Jan 19 '17 at 16:58

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