7

Minor problem, nevertheless irritating : Is there a way to avoid the following message from appearing each time I make a query :

-- Loading resources from /Users/ThG/.sqliterc

7

As a stupid workaround, this works:

<. sqlite your_sqlite.db 'select * from your_table'

This is because the current code does this:

 if( stdin_is_interactive ){
   utf8_printf(stderr,"-- Loading resources from %s\n",sqliterc);
 }

Forcing a stdin redirect thwarts this due to this piece of code:

stdin_is_interactive = isatty(0);

This works as well:

sqlite -batch your_sqlite.db 'select * from your_table'

due to this piece of code:

}else if( strcmp(z,"-batch")==0 ){
  /* Need to check for batch mode here to so we can avoid printing
  ** informational messages (like from process_sqliterc) before
  ** we do the actual processing of arguments later in a second pass.
  */
  stdin_is_interactive = 0;
}

but it's longer, so kind of defeats the purpose.

1
  • 1
    Unlike some other answers, this not only solves the problem, but respects the fact that some of us do like to have an .sqliterc for a reason, instead of assuming "bah who works in a shell anyway"
    – cryptarch
    Sep 8 '20 at 7:46
4

I know that this question is PRETTY old now, but simply deleting '/Users/ThG/.sqliterc' should solve the problem. '.sqliterc' is a configuration file for sqlite's interactive command line front-end. If you don't spend a lot of time in there, you won't miss the file.

1
  • Thank you for the answer. In fact, I use the command line front-end. I suppose this means I shall have to put up with it...
    – ThG
    Sep 24 '11 at 9:47
2

That resource msg comes out on stderr, and it's followed by a blank line, so you could get rid of it with something like this (wrapped up in a script file of its own):

#!/bin/bash
sqlite3 -init /your/init/file /your/sqlite3/file.db "
    your
    SQL
    cmds
" 2>/dev/null | sed -e1d
1

A bit late but @levant pied almost had the solution, you need to pass an additional -interactive to silence the --loading resources from.

$ sqlite3 -batch -interactive
SQLite version 3.31.1 2020-01-27 19:55:54
Enter ".help" for usage hints.
sqlite> .q
0

You can simply rename your config file to disable the warning. And revert the rename to keep the configuration after use.

I use the following:

#suppress default configuration warnings
mv $HOME/.sqliterc $HOME/.backup.sqliterc 

# sqlite3 scripts...

#revert
mv $HOME/.backup.sqliterc $HOME/.sqliterc
0

When using sqlite in shell scripts, you usually don't event want your ~/.sqliterc to be loaded at all. This works well for me:

sqlite3 -init <(echo)

Explanation:

  • -init specifies the file to load instead of ~/.sqliterc.
  • <(echo) uses Process Substitution to provide a path to a temporary empty file.
2
  • This does not work, now I see a -- Loading resources from /dev/fd/63. Aug 4 at 11:25
  • @user1461607 And /dev/fd/63 is empty, so your ~/.sqliterc is not loaded. Oct 19 at 9:18

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