123

Is there a command to retrieve the absolute path given the relative path?

For example I want $line to contain the absolute path of each file in dir ./etc/

find ./ -type f | while read line; do
   echo $line
done

18 Answers 18

56

use:

find $(pwd)/ -type f

to get all files or

echo $(pwd)/$line

to display full path (if relative path matters to)

  • 2
    what if i specify a relative path in the find?? – nubme Nov 13 '10 at 23:42
  • 11
    then see links in comment to your question, best way probably is 'readlink -f $line' – mpapis Nov 13 '10 at 23:45
  • your right findlink worked the best =] thanks – nubme Nov 13 '10 at 23:55
  • 2
    Why use $(pwd) in place of $PWD? (yes, I know pwd is a builtin) – Adam Katz Dec 20 '18 at 22:27
142

Try realpath.

~ $ sudo apt-get install realpath  # may already be installed
~ $ realpath .bashrc
/home/username/.bashrc

To avoid expanding symlinks, use realpath -s.

The answer comes from "bash/fish command to print absolute path to a file".

  • 9
    realpath does not seem to be available on the Mac (OS X 10.11 "El Capitan"). :-( – Laryx Decidua Dec 28 '16 at 19:30
  • 1
    awesome, works on mac too, thank you – To Kra Jan 12 '17 at 19:36
  • realpath does not seem to be available on CentOS 6 either – user5359531 Jan 27 '17 at 19:27
  • 6
    on osx, brew install coreutils will bring in realpath – Kevin Chen Dec 27 '17 at 22:43
  • On my Ubuntu 18.04, realpath is already present. I didn't have to install it separately. – Acumenus Jan 21 at 14:25
95

If you have the coreutils package installed you can generally use readlink -f relative_file_name in order to retrieve the absolute one (with all symlinks resolved)

  • 16
    Unfortunately this doesn't work on Mac :( – Brad Peabody May 9 '15 at 22:56
  • 2
    The behaviour for this is a little different from what the user asks, it will also follow and resolve recursive symlinks anywhere in the path. You might not want that in some cases. – ffledgling Oct 21 '16 at 13:28
  • 1
    @BradPeabody This does work in a Mac if you install coreutils from homebrew brew install coreutils. However the executable is prepended by a g: greadlink -f relative_file_name – Miguel Isla Jun 8 '18 at 8:10
  • 2
    Notice that the manual page of readlink(1) has as the first sentence of its description: "Note realpath(1) is the preferred command to use for canonicalization functionality." – josch Jun 13 '18 at 5:47
  • 1
    you can use -e instead of -f to check if the file/directory exists or not – Iceman Oct 17 '18 at 18:23
50
#! /bin/sh
echo "$(cd "$(dirname "$1")"; pwd)/$(basename "$1")"

UPD Some explanations

  1. This script get relative path as argument "$1"
  2. Then we get dirname part of that path (you can pass either dir or file to this script): dirname "$1"
  3. Then we cd "$(dirname "$1") into this relative dir and get absolute path for it by running pwd shell command
  4. After that we append basename to absolute path: $(basename "$1")
  5. As final step we echo it
  • 6
    This answer uses the best Bash idiom – Rondo Apr 14 '16 at 2:22
  • 1
    readlink is the simple solution for linux, but this solution works on OSX too, so +1 – thetoolman Aug 21 '17 at 23:58
  • 1
    @josch: The question is not about symlink resolving. But if you want to do that you can provide -P option to pwd command: echo "$(cd "$(dirname "$1")"; pwd -P)/$(basename "$1")" – Eugen Konkov Jun 13 '18 at 7:10
  • 2
    I like the answer, but it only works, if the user is allowed to cd into the directory. This might not always be possible. – Matthias B Jun 22 '18 at 10:28
  • 1
    My personal favourite :) Unfortunately, it failed when I fed it "." and ".." as relative paths. Slightly improved version: stackoverflow.com/a/51264222/508355 – hashchange Jul 10 '18 at 11:40
31

For what it's worth, I voted for the answer that was picked, but wanted to share a solution. The downside is, it's Linux only - I spent about 5 minutes trying to find the OSX equivalent before coming to Stack overflow. I'm sure it's out there though.

On Linux you can use readlink -e in tandem with dirname.

$(dirname $(readlink -e ../../../../etc/passwd))

yields

/etc/

And then you use dirname's sister, basename to just get the filename

$(basename ../../../../../passwd)

yields

passwd

Put it all together..

F=../../../../../etc/passwd
echo "$(dirname $(readlink -e $F))/$(basename $F)"

yields

/etc/passwd

You're safe if you're targeting a directory, basename will return nothing and you'll just end up with double slashes in the final output.

  • 3
    just readlink -e ../../../../etc/passwd works here – Erik Aronesty Jun 14 '13 at 14:02
  • Excellent entry with dirname, readlink, and basename. That helped me to get the absolute path of a symbolic link -- not its target. – kevinarpe Nov 19 '13 at 14:52
  • Doesn't work when you want to return path to symbolic links (which I just happen to need to do...). – Tomáš Zato Apr 21 '15 at 19:01
  • How could you ever find the absolute path to a path that doesn't exist? – synthesizerpatel Jan 25 '16 at 17:33
  • @synthesizerpatel Quite easily, I would have thought; if I'm in /home/GKFX and I type touch newfile, then before I press enter you could work out that I mean "create /home/GKFX/newfile", which is an absolute path to a file that doesn't exist yet. – GKFX Sep 24 '17 at 18:22
24

I think this is the most portable:

abspath() {                                               
    cd "$(dirname "$1")"
    printf "%s/%s\n" "$(pwd)" "$(basename "$1")"
    cd "$OLDPWD"
}

It will fail if the path does not exist though.

  • 3
    There's no need to cd back again. See stackoverflow.com/a/21188136/1504556. Your's is the best answer on this page, IMHO. For those interested the link gives an explanation as to why this solution works. – peterh Jan 26 '14 at 11:54
  • This is not very portable, dirname is a GNU core utility, not common to all unixen I believe. – einpoklum Jun 20 '17 at 13:47
  • @einpoklum dirname is a POSIX standard utility, see here: pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/utilities/dirname.html – Ernest A Jun 20 '17 at 14:51
  • Oh my God, thank you. I've been trying to fix the version that uses ${1##*/} for a day now, and now that I replaced that trash with basename "$1" it seems to finally be properly handling paths that end in /. – l3l_aze Aug 28 '18 at 19:05
16

realpath is probably best

But ...

The initial question was very confused to start with, with an example poorly related to the question as stated.

The selected answer actually answers the example given, and not at all the question in the title. The first command is that answer (is it really ? I doubt), and could do as well without the '/'. And I fail to see what the second command is doing.

Several issues are mixed :

  • changing a relative pathname into an absolute one, whatever it denotes, possibly nothing. (Typically, if you issue a command such as touch foo/bar, the pathname foo/bar must exist for you, and possibly be used in computation, before the file is actually created.)

  • there may be several absolute pathname that denote the same file (or potential file), notably because of symbolic links (symlinks) on the path, but possibly for other reasons (a device may be mounted twice as read-only). One may or may not want to resolve explicity such symlinks.

  • getting to the end of a chain of symbolic links to a non-symlink file or name. This may or may not yield an absolute path name, depending on how it is done. And one may, or may not want to resolve it into an absolute pathname.

The command readlink foo without option gives an answer only if its argument foo is a symbolic link, and that answer is the value of that symlink. No other link is followed. The answer may be a relative path: whatever was the value of the symlink argument.

However, readlink has options (-f -e or -m) that will work for all files, and give one absolute pathname (the one with no symlinks) to the file actually denoted by the argument.

This works fine for anything that is not a symlink, though one might desire to use an absolute pathname without resolving the intermediate symlinks on the path. This is done by the command realpath -s foo

In the case of a symlink argument, readlink with its options will again resolve all symlinks on the absolute path to the argument, but that will also include all symlinks that may be encountered by following the argument value. You may not want that if you desired an absolute path to the argument symlink itself, rather than to whatever it may link to. Again, if foo is a symlink, realpath -s foo will get an absolute path without resolving symlinks, including the one given as argument.

Without the -s option, realpath does pretty much the same as readlink, except for simply reading the value of a link, as well as several other things. It is just not clear to me why readlink has its options, creating apparently an undesirable redundancy with realpath.

Exploring the web does not say much more, except that there may be some variations across systems.

Conclusion : realpath is the best command to use, with the most flexibility, at least for the use requested here.

6

Eugen's answer didn't quite work for me but this did:

    absolute="$(cd $(dirname \"$file\"); pwd)/$(basename \"$file\")"

Side note, your current working directory is unaffected.

  • Notice: that is script. where $1 is first argument for it – Eugen Konkov Jun 21 '17 at 20:21
5

My favourite solution was the one by @EugenKonkov because it didn't imply the presence of other utilities (the coreutils package).

But it failed for the relative paths "." and "..", so here is a slightly improved version handling these special cases.

It still fails if the user doesn't have the permission to cd into the parent directory of the relative path, though.

#! /bin/sh

# Takes a path argument and returns it as an absolute path. 
# No-op if the path is already absolute.
function to-abs-path {
    local target="$1"

    if [ "$target" == "." ]; then
        echo "$(pwd)"
    elif [ "$target" == ".." ]; then
        echo "$(dirname "$(pwd)")"
    else
        echo "$(cd "$(dirname "$1")"; pwd)/$(basename "$1")"
    fi
}
  • Thank you. This is definitely the best solution offered. – mattmc3 Jul 31 '18 at 1:30
  • @mattmc3 Thanks! :) – hashchange Jul 31 '18 at 7:08
3

In case of find, it's probably easiest to just give the absolute path for it to search in, e.g.:

find /etc
find `pwd`/subdir_of_current_dir/ -type f
3

If you are using bash on Mac OS X which neither has realpath existed nor its readlink can print the absolute path, you may have choice but to code your own version to print it. Here is my implementation:

(pure bash)

abspath(){
  local thePath
  if [[ ! "$1" =~ ^/ ]];then
    thePath="$PWD/$1"
  else
    thePath="$1"
  fi
  echo "$thePath"|(
  IFS=/
  read -a parr
  declare -a outp
  for i in "${parr[@]}";do
    case "$i" in
    ''|.) continue ;;
    ..)
      len=${#outp[@]}
      if ((len==0));then
        continue
      else
        unset outp[$((len-1))] 
      fi
      ;;
    *)
      len=${#outp[@]}
      outp[$len]="$i"
      ;;
    esac
  done
  echo /"${outp[*]}"
)
}

(use gawk)

abspath_gawk() {
    if [[ -n "$1" ]];then
        echo $1|gawk '{
            if(substr($0,1,1) != "/"){
                path = ENVIRON["PWD"]"/"$0
            } else path = $0
            split(path, a, "/")
            n = asorti(a, b,"@ind_num_asc")
            for(i in a){
                if(a[i]=="" || a[i]=="."){
                    delete a[i]
                }
            }
            n = asorti(a, b, "@ind_num_asc")
            m = 0
            while(m!=n){
                m = n
                for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
                    if(a[b[i]]==".."){
                        if(b[i-1] in a){
                            delete a[b[i-1]]
                            delete a[b[i]]
                            n = asorti(a, b, "@ind_num_asc")
                            break
                        } else exit 1
                    }
                }
            }
            n = asorti(a, b, "@ind_num_asc")
            if(n==0){
                printf "/"
            } else {
                for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
                    printf "/"a[b[i]]
                }
            }
        }'
    fi
}

(pure bsd awk)

#!/usr/bin/env awk -f
function abspath(path,    i,j,n,a,b,back,out){
  if(substr(path,1,1) != "/"){
    path = ENVIRON["PWD"]"/"path
  }
  split(path, a, "/")
  n = length(a)
  for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
    if(a[i]==""||a[i]=="."){
      continue
    }
    a[++j]=a[i]
  }
  for(i=j+1;i<=n;i++){
    delete a[i]
  }
  j=0
  for(i=length(a);i>=1;i--){
    if(back==0){
      if(a[i]==".."){
        back++
        continue
      } else {
        b[++j]=a[i]
      }
    } else {
      if(a[i]==".."){
        back++
        continue
      } else {
        back--
        continue
      }
    }
  }
  if(length(b)==0){
    return "/"
  } else {
    for(i=length(b);i>=1;i--){
      out=out"/"b[i]
    }
    return out
  }
}

BEGIN{
  if(ARGC>1){
    for(k=1;k<ARGC;k++){
      print abspath(ARGV[k])
    }
    exit
  }
}
{
  print abspath($0)
}

example:

$ abspath I/am/.//..//the/./god/../of///.././war
/Users/leon/I/the/war
2

The best solution, imho, is the one posted here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/3373298/9724628.

It does require python to work, but it seems to cover all or most of the edge cases and be very portable solution.

  1. With resolving symlinks:
python -c "import os,sys; print os.path.realpath(sys.argv[1])" path/to/file
  1. or without it:
python -c "import os,sys; print os.path.abspath(sys.argv[1])" path/to/file
1

What they said, except find $PWD or (in bash) find ~+ is a bit more convenient.

1

Similar to @ernest-a's answer but without affecting $OLDPWD or define a new function you could fire a subshell (cd <path>; pwd)

$ pwd
/etc/apache2
$ cd ../cups 
$ cd -
/etc/apache2
$ (cd ~/..; pwd)
/Users
$ cd -
/etc/cups
1

If the relative path is a directory path, then try mine, should be the best:

absPath=$(pushd ../SOME_RELATIVE_PATH_TO_Directory > /dev/null && pwd && popd > /dev/null)

echo $absPath
1
echo "mydir/doc/ mydir/usoe ./mydir/usm" |  awk '{ split($0,array," "); for(i in array){ system("cd "array[i]" && echo $PWD") } }'
  • 3
    Thank you for this code snippet, which might provide some limited short-term help. A proper explanation would greatly improve its long-term value by showing why this is a good solution to the problem, and would make it more useful to future readers with other, similar questions. Please edit your answer to add some explanation, including the assumptions you've made. – Toby Speight Feb 21 '18 at 9:17
0

If you want to transform a variable containing a relative path into an absolute one, this works :

   dir=`cd "$dir"`

"cd" echoes without changing the working directory, because executed here in a sub-shell.

  • 1
    On bash-4.3-p46, this doesn’t work: the shell prints an empty line when I run dir=`cd ".."` && echo $dir – Michael Sep 24 '16 at 3:05
0

This is a chained solution from all others, for example, when realpath fails, either because it is not installed or because it exits with error code, then, the next solution is attempted until it get the path right.

#!/bin/bash

function getabsolutepath() {
    local target;
    local changedir;
    local basedir;
    local firstattempt;

    target="${1}";
    if [ "$target" == "." ];
    then
        printf "%s" "$(pwd)";

    elif [ "$target" == ".." ];
    then
        printf "%s" "$(dirname "$(pwd)")";

    else
        changedir="$(dirname "${target}")" && basedir="$(basename "${target}")" && firstattempt="$(cd "${changedir}" && pwd)" && printf "%s/%s" "${firstattempt}" "${basedir}" && return 0;
        firstattempt="$(readlink -f "${target}")" && printf "%s" "${firstattempt}" && return 0;
        firstattempt="$(realpath "${target}")" && printf "%s" "${firstattempt}" && return 0;

        # If everything fails... TRHOW PYTHON ON IT!!!
        local fullpath;
        local pythoninterpreter;
        local pythonexecutables;
        local pythonlocations;

        pythoninterpreter="python";
        declare -a pythonlocations=("/usr/bin" "/bin");
        declare -a pythonexecutables=("python" "python2" "python3");

        for path in "${pythonlocations[@]}";
        do
            for executable in "${pythonexecutables[@]}";
            do
                fullpath="${path}/${executable}";

                if [[ -f "${fullpath}" ]];
                then
                    # printf "Found ${fullpath}\\n";
                    pythoninterpreter="${fullpath}";
                    break;
                fi;
            done;

            if [[ "${pythoninterpreter}" != "python" ]];
            then
                # printf "Breaking... ${pythoninterpreter}\\n"
                break;
            fi;
        done;

        firstattempt="$(${pythoninterpreter} -c "import os, sys; print( os.path.abspath( sys.argv[1] ) );" "${target}")" && printf "%s" "${firstattempt}" && return 0;
        # printf "Error: Could not determine the absolute path!\\n";
        return 1;
    fi
}

printf "\\nResults:\\n%s\\nExit: %s\\n" "$(getabsolutepath "./asdfasdf/ asdfasdf")" "${?}"

protected by Inian Jul 10 '18 at 11:39

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