6

I want to detect in my JavaScript code that the load of a Facebook pixel has been completed. Is this possible?

For reference here is the Facebook Pixel Tracking code:

<script>
!function(f,b,e,v,n,t,s){if(f.fbq)return;n=f.fbq=function(){n.callMethod?
n.callMethod.apply(n,arguments):n.queue.push(arguments)};if(!f._fbq)f._fbq=n;
n.push=n;n.loaded=!0;n.version='2.0';n.queue=[];t=b.createElement(e);t.async=!0;
t.src=v;s=b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(t,s)}(window,
document,'script','//connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js');
// Insert Your Facebook Pixel ID below. 
fbq('init', 'FB_PIXEL_ID');
fbq('track', 'PageView');
</script>
<!-- Insert Your Facebook Pixel ID below. --> 
<noscript><img height="1" width="1" style="display:none"
src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=FB_PIXEL_ID&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1"
/></noscript>

Breaking it down, it seems that fbq('init', ...) causes a script tag to be added with the async attribute set and src set to //connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js.

Subsequently the call to fbq('track', ...) somehow causes an HTTP GET to an image via one redirect.

How to detect that all the steps are complete, especially that the final image load is complete?

  • @CBroe look carefully, async is set to !0 which evaluates to true. and fbq is defined inline so the calls to fbq work just fine even though the script is loading async. – user2297550 Feb 3 '17 at 11:30
  • 1
    @CBroe various scenarios in which i want to know it is complete: say the user clicks on a control that will take him to a different website, then i want to delay the redirection until the pixel is loaded. This could happen if the network is slow and the user has clicked the control immediately. – user2297550 Feb 4 '17 at 11:17
  • @CBroe Please go away from this question. You started out with petty critiques, leading me on to correct and clarify, under the assumption that this was a constructive exercise. Ultimately, you choose to unload a rather untechnical opinion without anything technically redeeming to accompany it. – user2297550 Feb 5 '17 at 1:40
5

I took a stab at this. Given a callback function named myCallback and your private id named myId, use this code:

  (function wait() {
    // check for the generic script
    // easiest check to prevent race condition
    if (fbq.version > '2.0') {
      // now check for the custom script
      // `fbq.on` is now ready (`fbq.once` would be better but has a bug)
     fbq.on('configLoaded', function (name) {
        if (name === myId) {
          myCallback();
        }
      });
    } else {
      setTimeout(wait, 10);
    }
  })();

myCallback will be called once everything is ready. This is accurate as of fbq.version="2.7.17";

Reference https://github.com/poteto/ember-metrics/pull/151

  • 2
    Listen up all - Kelly Selden rocks. This is accurate answer and the only one in the entire web, I couldn't find any reference/documentation regarding this event, only the JS's script files return in the pixel request. If any one has documentation reference, please share. – naviram Oct 3 '17 at 20:31
  • 2
    @naviram Thanks. I found it by unminifying and reading their source. This stuff is no where in their documentation unfortunately. – Kelly Selden Oct 5 '17 at 20:32
  • @ KellySelden thank you; this escaped my attention. Are you sure this would solve the problem of redirecting from a temporary page after pixel loaded? I want to build a landing page that "paints" the visitor before redirecting them to final destinations. If so, I'll take your word and @naviram's recommendation and mark this as the correct answer. – user2297550 Mar 29 at 13:56
4

You can use below code if you want to trigger specific FB event after successful completion of FB pixel loading, here is the code:

 <script>
        function drop_fb_pixel() {
            try {
                //Drop FB Pixel
                fbq('track', 'ViewContent', {
                    content_ids: ['12'],
                    content_type: 'product' 
                });
            }
            catch (err) {
                setTimeout(function () { drop_fb_pixel(); }, 3000);

            }
        }
        $(document).ready(function () {
            drop_fb_pixel();
        });


    </script>

The logic is pretty simple, after document load this script will try to trigger FB event, if got error then it will try to trigger event again after 3 sec, you can customize the time of event trigger as per your own application logic

  • 2
    it seems your code does not demonstrate any way to trigger code after facebook pixel is loaded? the timeout is not at all a reliable way because the network may be slow. – user2297550 Feb 3 '17 at 11:24
  • @user2297550, Love's code checks if the Facebook Pixel exists on document load, and if it doesn't, it begins a timeout to check again in 3 seconds and continue doing this until the pixel exists. Even if the network is slow, this continues to run every 3 seconds until the pixel exists. – John Washam May 4 '17 at 20:13
  • @JohnWasham Not quite. As far as I understand, the code merely modifies the DOM to add a <script> tag or an <img> tag. The associated network request could take a long time and I have no way to know whether or not that request was completed. Additionally, I do not see how it checks for "pixel exists" (what does existence mean anyway?), so I am not sure how even polling every 3 seconds would detect that the network request to Facebook came back successfully. – user2297550 May 5 '17 at 10:32
  • @user2297550, the Facebook Pixel code snippet first ensures the fbq variable exists. It then loads a JS file onto your site to build the functionality of the fbq object. You can actually run commands on the fbq object even before the FB JS file is loaded, as those commands get added to a queue that will be iterated when the fbq object loads. In the case of the function in this answer, it can be run even before the FB Pixel code is included on your site, as it will keep trying to run the fbq('track'...) command until the fbq variable exists. – John Washam May 5 '17 at 16:08
  • 1
    Understood. You really need to change the title of your question then, as it gives the impression you simply want to know when the Pixel is loaded. Love's answer does that. But you are really wanting to know when individual tracking events complete, correct? – John Washam May 7 '17 at 1:42
1

Since OP @user2297550 said his ultimate goal is to redirect a user after an event fires, I'll explain how that can be done (without timeouts or intervals). Some previous answers try to detect when the Facebook pixel <script> is done loading, but that's not the same as determining when an actual event is done firing. Presumably, OP want's to know when the PageView event is complete. This solution is not amazing for every use case, but it's pretty simple if we don't have much else happening on the page.

In order to ping their servers and track events, Facebook's code creates a new Image() and sets its src attribute to something like https://www.facebook.com/tr/?id=XXXXXX&ev=PageView&{more parameters}. I discovered this by examining the tracking library and finding this sendGET function:

this.sendGET = function(b, c, d) {
    b.replaceEntry("rqm", "GET");
    var f = b.toQueryString();
    f = i(c, d) + "?" + f;
    if (f.length < 2048) {
        var g = new Image();
        if (d != null) {
            var h = a.getShouldProxy();
            g.onerror = function() {
                a.setShouldProxy(!0), h || e.sendGET(b, c, d)
            }
        }
        g.src = f;
        return !0
    }
    return !1
};

We can hook into that image load by polyfilling a default Image.onload callback with our redirect code. The result is something like this, which could be placed immediately above the normal Facebook pixel code in your header:

OriginalImage = Image;
Image = function(){
  let oi = new OriginalImage();
  oi.onload = function() {
    // if the image that loaded was indeed a Facebook pixel
    // for a "PageView" event, redirect
    if( this.src.indexOf( 'facebook.com/tr/?id=XXXXXX&ev=PageView' ) != -1 )
      window.location = 'https://example.com/redirect-here';
  };
  return oi;
};

So a full "paint the user and redirect" page could look about like this:

<html>
<head>
<!-- Facebook Pixel Code -->
<script>
  OriginalImage = Image;
  Image = function(){
    let oi = new OriginalImage();
    oi.onload = function() {
      // if the image that loaded was indeed a Facebook pixel
      // for a "PageView" event, redirect
      if( this.src.indexOf( 'facebook.com/tr/?id=XXXXXX&ev=PageView' ) != -1 )
        window.location = 'https://example.com/redirect-here';
    };
    return oi;
  };

  !function(f,b,e,v,n,t,s)
  {if(f.fbq)return;n=f.fbq=function(){n.callMethod?
  n.callMethod.apply(n,arguments):n.queue.push(arguments)};
  if(!f._fbq)f._fbq=n;n.push=n;n.loaded=!0;n.version='2.0';
  n.queue=[];t=b.createElement(e);t.async=!0;
  t.src=v;s=b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0];
  s.parentNode.insertBefore(t,s)}(window, document,'script',
  'https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js');
  fbq('init', 'XXXXXX');
  fbq('track', 'PageView');
</script>
<noscript>
  <img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" 
       src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=XXXXXX&ev=PageView&noscript=1"/>
</noscript>
<!-- End Facebook Pixel Code -->
</head>
<body></body>
</html>

Of course, you could skip the Javascript and literally just load the image from that <noscript> block and add an 'onload' attribute, like so:

<html>
<head>
<!-- Facebook Pixel Code -->
<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" 
       src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=XXXXXX&ev=PageView&noscript=1"
       onload="window.location = 'https://example.com/redirect-here';"/>
<!-- End Facebook Pixel Code -->
</head>
<body></body>
</html>

But I would guess that plain image tracking degrades Facebook's ability to identify the user.

This strategy may work for more generic use cases where you want to detect when an arbitrary event is done being sent to Facebook. But it may be unwise to polyfill the onload callback for every single image on a normal page. Also know that Facebook could change their code at any time, breaking this.

  • +1 for a nice explanation and good effort -- but, you may be wrong about facebook always or even usually tracking by causing an image load. Modern javascript communicates events by loading scripts not images (the method is called "scriptsrc" because you insert a <script src="https://facebook.com/track/someopaqueid" /> Hence I am not accepting this as correct. – user2297550 Apr 2 at 7:43
  • That's correct, they load JS first. But that script is just a library used for tracking later on the page. I looked at Facebook's actual code and found a function named sendGET that is used to send the actual event requests. It creates the new Image() and sets its src, which gave me the idea to hook into the Image object. I tested this for exactly your use case and it worked. The tracking event was always sent and then the redirect happened. I'll add the sendGet definition to my OP so we can see how it works. – Dan Apr 2 at 15:21
0

The answer of @love-chopra is sort of alright, however I think to use the setTimeout() with 3s delay is not the best solution when we are talking about a webpage. From my POV the solution could be the setInterval() to check it constantly until the fbevents.js not loaded.

  var fbLoaded = false;
  var tryFB = null;

  function drop_fb_pixel() {
    fbLoaded = true;
    try {
      fbq('track', 'ViewContent', {
        content_ids: ['12'],
        content_type: 'product' 
      });
    } catch (err) {
      fbLoaded = false;
    }

    if (fbLoaded) {
      clearInterval(tryFB);
    }
  }

  tryFB = setInterval(function () { 
    drop_fb_pixel();
  }, 100);
-1
<script>
  $(document).ready(function () {

    function fbqcheck() {
      if(typeof fbq === 'undefined') {
        setTimeout(fbqcheck, 5);
      } else {
        alert('Facebook pixel loaded');
      }
    }

    fbqcheck();

  });
</script>
  • downvote since this polls rather than precisely detecting when – user2297550 May 21 at 5:30
  • I misunderstood your question. I thought you were interested to know when the Facebook pixel loading had been completed. – Jon May 23 at 21:08
-2

I know this is an old post, but how about loading in Facebook Pixel Helper as a Chrome Extension? This tells you immediately if there is a Pixel loading on your website.


enter image description here

  • you don't have to answer questions in order to use this site – user2297550 Jun 11 at 4:25

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