So in this simple example lets say you have an element that on hover has an animation that moves it to the right. Then when the mouse moves instead of jumping straight back to the original position it transitions back to that state.

#test{
  position:absolute;
  left:0;
  transition:left 3s linear;
}
#test:hover{
  animation:move 4s linear;
}
@keyframes move{
  0%{
    left:0;
  }
  100%{
    left:300px;
  }
}
<div id="test">Hover</div>

The result doesn't work in any either Edge or Chrome. Firefox works but only on the first animation. Any subsequent animations won't work until you refresh the page. So is this possible? And why does Firefox work once then stop?

So I am clearer this is an simple example. Sure this can be done with just transitions, but transitions are limited and not always possible. Also if you will notice a return animation isn't possible since it could be from an arbitrary point.

Rather than using the animation and transition properties, you can accomplish this using just the transition property.

#test{
  position:absolute;
  left: 0;
  transition: left 4s linear;
}
#test:hover{
  left: 300px;
  transition: left 4s linear;
}

The issue you're having is that the animation must complete in order to transition into a different state. Furthermore, when you mouse out another animation needs to be added to the non-hover selector which animates from 300px back to 0px. To fix this, just use the transition property within the hover and non-hover selectors. However, this is really only a 2 state solution. If you want more granular control of the animation then you'll probably want to create two separate animations one for forward and one backwards.

  • This is a simple example not everything can be done with just a transition. – qw3n Jan 21 '17 at 23:25
  • @qw3n Yes, however most animations can. You can chain animations together, and animate nearly every css property. For more complex animations, sure keyframe animations give you more control, but for what you asked the transition property alone accomplishes it. What more are you looking to do that makes you against using transition? – Dondrey Taylor Jan 21 '17 at 23:37
  • The main reason is you can't animate from an unknown start point. In this example if you leave in the animation in the middle their isn't a way to know where that happens in terms of animations. Transitions don't really care about the start they just work their way to the end. – qw3n Jan 22 '17 at 0:58
  • @qw3n That's exactly what I had mentioned in my reply. Animations need to complete before you can segue into another, hence why when you mouse-out the animation abruptly ends instead of animate to your starting position. I'm still a little lost as to what you're trying to accomplish and why using animations is better than transition as a proper solution to your issue. Can you elaborate on what you're trying to do that you can't with transition? – Dondrey Taylor Jan 22 '17 at 3:01
  • Consider any scenario that needs an animation (e.g. zigzag motion) because of being impossible to do with a transition. Then consider that it gets canceled in the middle somewhere. Instead of wanting to just jump back to the starting point it seems transitions should allow it to smoothly return to the starting point, but they don't. Check the example in Firefox it will work as desired on the first run. – qw3n Jan 22 '17 at 4:16

Just use the transition on the non-hover selector. No need for animation here.

#test {
  position:absolute;
  left: 0;
  transition: left 4s linear;
}
#test:hover {
  left: 300px;
}
<div id="test">Hover</div>

  • This is a simple example not everything can be done with just a transition. – qw3n Jan 21 '17 at 23:24

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