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I saw this javascript snippet/ question here The best answer is

function sumDigits(number) {
    var remainder = number % 10;
    var sum = remainder;
    if(number >= 10) {
        var rest = Math.floor(number / 10);
        sum += sumDigits(rest); 
    }
    return sum;
}

I'm trying to understand how it works. I can understand some of the lines but it's confusing though.

What I can understand is

var remainder = number % 10;
var sum = remainder;

return the remainder of the number. In other words, if the number is 145 and it's divided by 10, the remainder is 5. Therefore, the sum is 5. Next,

if(number >= 10) {

The number needs to be more than or equal to 10 because you cannot add up a single digit by itself, therefore '10' is the minimum in which you can add two digits together. Next,

var rest = Math.floor(number / 10); 

145 divided by 10 is 14.5. Math.floor will round it down to 14. Therefore, rest = 14. Next,

sum += sumDigits(rest);

Since rest is 14, that means that sumDigits is 14. So since the sum is 5, it adds itself to the rest. In other words, sum = 5 + 14. In conclusion, the sum is 19.

That's why it's confusing for me because it doesn't add up when 145 = 1 + 4 + 5 = 10. In other words, the sum should be 10, not 19?!?!?????

4

Let me break it down for you:

sumDigits(145)
5 + sumDigits(14)
5 + 4 + sumDigits(1)
5 + 4 + 1 => 10

update 1

Add the parentheses, which shows how it really works:

sumDigits(145)
5 + sumDigits(14)
5 + (4 + sumDigits(1))
5 + (4 + 1) 
5 + 5 => 10

update 2

Actually, the intermediate results can be printed out.

function sumDigits(number) {
    var temp;
    var remainder = number % 10;
    var sum = remainder;
    if (number >= 10) {
        var rest = Math.floor(number / 10);
        console.log(sum + " + sumDigits(" + rest + ")");
        temp = sumDigits(rest);
        console.log(sum + " + " + temp);
        sum += temp;
    }
    return sum;
}
console.log(sumDigits(145));

  • Thanks so much! I'm wondering if I can ask you to become a mentor or know anyone who can become a mentor? I'm looking right now for a mentor in Javascript as I'm studying Javascript and have several questions... – Kristina Bressler Jan 23 '17 at 15:43
  • @KristinaBressler My pleasure! I'm very flattered that someone ask me to become a mentor and I'd love to be your mentor, but I'm not an experienced Javascript programmer, although I have some programming backgrouds, I'm learning JS too. I know 'stackoverflow' is a great place to ask questions, a lot of people here are happy to help others solve problems and answer their questions, let's learn and make progress together! – Joe Yichong Jan 24 '17 at 2:03
  • really? this is what the function is doing? duh! – Nabeel Khan Jan 24 '17 at 14:13
  • True...However, sometimes I don't get answers to some questions I've posted. Thus, that's the reason I need a mentor in which my mentor and I can discuss JS and help me review what I miss or don't understand.... – Kristina Bressler Jan 24 '17 at 16:31
  • 1
    @NabeelKhan Yes. That's how recursion works, I have updated my answer, run the snippet and you will see it. – Joe Yichong Jan 25 '17 at 2:52
1

The funciton works fine as expected.

Once you get 19 in the end, it runs it again in same function, as 19 is greater than 10. So 1+9 would equal to 10.

0

I think the key here is

Since rest is 14, that means that sumDigits is 14.

If you ran just sumDigit(14), you would sum 1 and 4 = 5. Then 5 is added to the original 5 in 145

When I was thinking this through, I refactored it a bit, which helped me understand what's going on. Here's another way of thinking about it:

function sumDigits(number) {
    var integerDigit = number % 10;

    // If there are digits remaining (i.e. not a single digit number)
    if(number >= 10) {
        // Return the current digit plus sumDigits of remaining digits
        return integerDigit + sumDigits(Math.floor(number / 10));
    }

    // If it is a single digit, just return the number
    return number;
}

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