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I'm learning Erlang from Learn You Some Erlang for great good! and as an exercise trying to implement a factorial function in Reverse Polish Notation calculator. So far I have this:

-module(rps).
-export([calculate/1]).

calculate(List) ->
  calculate(List, []).

calculate([], [ Number ]) ->
  Number;
calculate([ Head | Tail ], Stack) ->
  case Head of
    "+" ->
      [ B, A | Rest ] = Stack,
      calculate(Tail, [ A + B | Rest ]);
    "-" ->
      [ B, A | Rest ] = Stack,
      calculate(Tail, [ A - B | Rest ]);
    "*" ->
      [ B, A | Rest ] = Stack,
      calculate(Tail, [ A * B | Rest ]);
    "/" ->
      [ B, A | Rest ] = Stack,
      calculate(Tail, [ A / B | Rest ]);
    "!" ->
      [ A | Rest ] = Stack,
      calculate(Tail, [ factorial(A) | Rest ]);
    _ ->
      calculate(Tail, [ Head | Stack ])
  end.

factorial(N) ->
  factorial(N, 1).

factorial(0, Accumulator) ->
  Accumulator;
factorial(N, Accumulator) when N >= 0  ->
  factorial(N - 1, Accumulator * N).

Now the problem is in my factorial/2 function, particularly the base case with N = 0. It works as expected as long as the first element on stack is an integer, e.g.:

5> rpcalc:calculate([1, 2, "+", "!"]).
6

However I've notice that division always returns a float, even if both arguments are integers and result is a whole number, e.g.:

7> 4 / 2.
2.0

So sometimes floats appear on my stack. Then, even if they are positive and whole numbers, my factorial fails, as 0.0 =/= 0. The effect is:

13> rpcalc:calculate([6, 2, "/", "!"]).
** exception error: no function clause matching rpcalc:factorial(-1.0,0.0) (rpcalc.erl, line 33)
     in function  rpcalc:calculate/2 (rpcalc.erl, line 25)

What would be most elegant way to support positive whole floats here? My intuition is to have a case in factorial/1 that would detect such numbers and cast them to integers, but maybe there is some better way?

  • If you work with area integer numbers then you can use corresponding operation, in this case - div. So "/" -> [ B, A | Rest ] = Stack, calculate(Tail, [ A div B | Rest ]);. – user4651282 Jan 22 '17 at 9:35
  • Thanks. That may be part of the solution, but the problem is that it will always truncate the result. I do want to support floats in general and in case of fractions I want my factorial to throw. I just want 3.0 ! to produce 6. – Tadeusz Łazurski Jan 22 '17 at 9:43
1

After some more thought here is my own take on this:

factorial(N) ->
  factorial(float_to_integer(N), 1).

factorial(0, Accumulator) ->
  Accumulator;
factorial(N, Accumulator) when N >= 0  ->
  factorial(N - 1, Accumulator * N).

float_to_integer(N) when is_integer(N) ->
  N;
float_to_integer(N) when is_float(N) ->
  Integer = trunc(N),
  case N == Integer of
    true ->
      Integer;
    false ->
      error(badarg)
  end.

I've added a helper that I called float_to_integer that returns an integer for any whole number and throws an error otherwise. The name is a little misleading, as it can also handle integers. Then I use it to guard factorial/1.

  • 1
    good solution, but better use pattern matching and compare. Result float_to_integer(N) when is_integer(N)-> N; float_to_integer(N)-> Integer = trunc(N), case N == Integer of true -> Integer; false -> error(badarg) end. – user4651282 Jan 22 '17 at 11:12
  • 1
    Btw,if you need review of your code which works, you can ask question on CodeReview. – user4651282 Jan 22 '17 at 11:14
  • Thank you @Atomic_alarm. I've updated the code sample according to your advice. – Tadeusz Łazurski Jan 22 '17 at 11:30
1

There exists div which takes integers and performs integer division. You can write it as:

calculate([], [ Number ]) ->
    Number;
calculate([ "+" | Tail ], [ B, A | Rest ]) ->
    calculate(Tail, [ A + B | Rest ]);
calculate([ "-" | Tail ], [ B, A | Rest ]) ->
    calculate(Tail, [ A - B | Rest ]);
calculate([ "*" | Tail ], [ B, A | Rest ]) ->
    calculate(Tail, [ A * B | Rest ]);
calculate([ "/" | Tail ], [ B, A | Rest ])
    when is_integer(A), is_integer(B), A rem B =:= 0 ->
    calculate(Tail, [ A div B | Rest ]);
calculate([ "/" | Tail ], [ B, A | Rest ]) ->
    calculate(Tail, [ A / B | Rest ]);
calculate([ "!" | Tail ], [ A | Rest ]) ->
    calculate(Tail, [ factorial(A) | Rest ]);
calculate([ Head | Tail ], Stack) ->
    calculate(Tail, [ Head | Stack ]).
  • Thanks. I made a small edit, as your original code was resulting in compilation error (rpcalc.erl:20: variable 'A' is unbound rpcalc.erl:20: variable 'B' is unbound error). Also, it does help in some cases by protecting against floats produced from division, but what about `rpcalc:calculate([2.0, 2, "+", "!"]). – Tadeusz Łazurski Jan 22 '17 at 10:07
  • @TadeuszŁazurski, just add several condition. For example "/" -> [ B, A | Rest ] = Stack, if is_integer(A), is_integer(B), A rem B =:= 0 -> calculate(Tail, [ A div B | Rest ]); A==trunc(A),B==trunc(B)-> calculate(Tail, [ trunc(A) div trunc(B) | Rest ]); true -> calculate(Tail, [ A / B | Rest ]) end; – user4651282 Jan 22 '17 at 10:40
  • @Atomic_alarm I think trying to prevent division from returning floats is not the best approach. If I add more operations, I will have to safeguard them as well. Also floats may come from the original input to calculate/1. Please take a look at my own answer and let me know what you think. – Tadeusz Łazurski Jan 22 '17 at 10:55
  • 1
    @TadeuszŁazurski: The error was introduced by the very non-Erlangish nature of your code. See my correction. It is idiomatic Erlang. – Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jan 22 '17 at 14:24
  • @TadeuszŁazurski There is factorial functions for non-integers. They are Gamma and Pi function. See Factorial. – Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jan 22 '17 at 14:33

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