12

I'm using the CI Lint tester to try and figure out how to store an expected JSON result, which I later compare to a curl response. Neither of these work:

Attempt 1

---
  image: ruby:2.1
  script:
  - EXPECT_SERVER_OUTPUT='{"message": "Hello World"}'

Fails with:

did not find expected key while parsing a block mapping at line 4 column 5

Attempt 2

---
  image: ruby:2.1
  script:
  - EXPECT_SERVER_OUTPUT="{\"message\": \"Hello World\"}"

Fails with:

jobs:script config should be a hash

I've tried using various combinations of echo as well, without a working solution.

2 Answers 2

28

You could use literal block scalar1 style notation and put the variable definition and subsequent script lines on separate lines2 without worrying about quoting:

myjob:
  script:
    - |
      EXPECT_SERVER_OUTPUT='{"message": "Hello World"}'

or you can escape the nested double quotes:

myjob:
  script:
    - "EXPECT_SERVER_OUTPUT='{\"message\": \"Hello World\"}'"

but you may also want to just use variables like:

myjob:
  variables:
    EXPECT_SERVER_OUTPUT: '{"message": "Hello World"}'
  script:
    - dothething.sh

Note: variables are by default expanded inside variable definitions so take care with any $ characters inside the variable value (they must be written as $$ to be literal). This feature can also be turned off.

1See this answer for an explanation of this and related notation
2See this section of the GitLab docs for more info on multi-line commands

1
  • 1
    You could expand the answer with information about the first example (folded multiline string), it's rather hard to guess what it does the way it is now. Jan 23, 2017 at 9:10
2

I made it work like this:

  script: |
   "EXPECT_SERVER_OUTPUT='{\"message\": \"Hello World\"}'"
   echo $EXPECT_SERVER_OUTPUT

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.