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I've been trying to write a type trait with C++11/14 that tells if a type T is implicitly default-constructible. Examples of implicitly/explicitly default-constructible types:

struct Imp { Imp() = default; };
struct Exp { explicit Exp() = default; };

Imp i = {};  // ok
Exp e = {};  // error

I know this trait must somehow be implementable with C++17, because the default constructor of std::tuple<Ts...> is explicit if and only if not all of Ts... are implicitly default-constructible. So I'm wondering what the committee has in mind about its possible implementation.

What I've tried looks like this:

#include <type_traits>

template<typename T>
struct IsImplicitlyDefaultConstructible {
private:
  template<typename U> static void helper(const U&);
  template<typename U> static std::true_type test(decltype(helper<U>({}))*);
  template<typename U> static std::false_type test(...);

public:
  static constexpr bool value = decltype(test<T>(0))::value;
};

struct Yes { Yes() = default; };
struct No { explicit No() = default; };

int main()
{
  static_assert(IsImplicitlyDefaultConstructible<Yes>::value, "");
  static_assert(!IsImplicitlyDefaultConstructible<No>::value, "");
}

The idea is to test whether {} is convertible to const T&. Strangely, the code above works on GCC 6.1+, but fails on GCC 4/5 and all versions of Clang and CL. See demo here.

So what is happening? Is this a bug in GCC 6.1+, or in the other versions? How can I make this trait work (preferably with C++11, but okay if C++14 is required)?

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  • The problem is that they are treating No as an aggregate. – T.C. Jan 23 '17 at 4:05
  • @T.C. Could you elaborate? – Zizheng Tai Jan 23 '17 at 4:05
  • @T.C. In fact, you can't really tell between an implicitly default-constructible non-aggregate and an aggregate syntax-wise, can you? – Zizheng Tai Jan 23 '17 at 4:39
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    "I know this trait must somehow be implementable with C++17, because the default constructor of std::tuple<Ts...> is explicit if and only if not all of Ts... are implicitly default-constructible." That's not a good reason to believe this. tuple, as a standard library type, can be using a non-standard compiler intrinsic. – Nicol Bolas Jan 23 '17 at 5:24
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Every compiler for which your test case fails also accepts No n = {};.

Until recently, having an explicit default constructor doesn't prevent a class from being an aggregate.

{} for aggregates performs aggregate initialization and doesn't call any constructor, explicit or otherwise. Thus there is no error because the code doesn't attempt to call an explicit constructor in those compilers.

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  • So GCC 6.1+ conforms to the Standard most strictly. Correct? – Zizheng Tai Jan 23 '17 at 7:31

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