11

The problem itself:

class B{/*...*/};
class A {
    /* members */
    NON-static thread_local B var; // and a thread_local variable here
    ret_t method(/* args */);
};

I want var to exist independently each thread and each instance.

The larger (complete) problem:

Instances of A are shared across threads. B is some resource necessary to call A::method, and it must be independent with respect to threads to avoid race condition (that is, A::method must have "write access" to var). And the corresponding B are different for different instances of A.

One not fully satisfactory approach I came up with is to have some container (say std::unordered_map<THREAD_IDENTIFIER_TYPE, B>) to store each var corresponding to each thread per instance. However, this neither limit access to vars across threads nor prevent the whole container from being modified. (So that require developer to be careful enough to write safe code.)


I've seen a few post on java ThreadLocal keyword(?) on SO, but none of them seem to provide idea that really works. Any suggestion?

0

3 Answers 3

14

You can't have a non-static member declared thread_local. See cppreference. In particular:

the thread_local keyword is only allowed for objects declared at namespace scope, objects declared at block scope, and static data members.

If you don't want to use pthreads (tricky on Windows), some container is your only option.

One choice is a variant of std::unordered_map<THREAD_IDENTIFIER_TYPE, B>. (You could write a class to wrap it and protect the map with a mutex.)

Another initially attractive option is a thread_local static member of A which maps A* to B will avoid any need for locks.

class A {
    static thread_local std::unordered_map<A*, B> s_B;
    ....
};

usage:

void A::foo() {
    B& b = s_B[this];  // B needs to be default constructable.
    ...

The catch is that you need some way to remove elements from the s_B map. That's not too much of a problem if A objects are actually locked to a particular thread, or if you have some way to invoke functions on another thread - but it's not entirely trivial either. (You may find it safer to use a unique identifier for A which is an incrementing 64-bit counter - that way there is much less risk of the identifier being reused between destroying the A object and the message to remove the B from all the maps being processed.)

2
  • That's frustrating... Then I'd rather use a container in thread, for each instance, since it won't be shared and thus no need for mutex.
    – YiFei
    Jan 23, 2017 at 8:16
  • "The catch is that you need some way to remove elements from the s_B map. That's not too much of a problem if A objects are actually locked to a particular thread, or if you have some way to invoke functions on another thread - but it's not entirely trivial either." Could you elaborate on that? I still find it confusing why removing elements from the map might be hard.
    – Quentin
    May 15, 2020 at 15:52
3

If you're willing to use tbb (which is free even though by Intel), you could use their tbb::enumerable_thread_specific<T> template class (which essentially is something like std::unordered_map<thread_id,T> but lock free, I understand). Since the A are shared between threads, one such container per instance of A is required, but it appears B is better declared as a nested type. For example

class A
{
    struct B
    {
        B(const A*);
        void call(/* args */);
    };
    tbb::enumerable_thread_specific<B> tB ([&]()->B { return {this}; } );
    void method(/* args */)
    {
        tB.local().call(/* args */);   // lazily creates threadlocal B if required.
    }
    /* ... */
};
1

Where available, you could use pthread-functions pthread_getspecific and pthread_setspecific for a getter and a setter for that purpose:

#include <pthread.h>

class A {
private:
#define varKey 100L

public:

    int getVar() {
        void *mem = pthread_getspecific(varKey);
        if(mem)
            return *((int*)mem);
        else
            return 0;
    }

    void setVar(int val) {
        void *mem = malloc(sizeof(int));
        *((int*)mem)=val;
        pthread_setspecific(varKey, mem);
    }

    ~A() {
        void *mem = pthread_getspecific(varKey);
        if (mem)
            free(mem);
    }

};
5
  • Thanks for your idea! I know little about pthread specific APIs, but this feels like keeping a container at thread level, and store the var in it, isn't it?
    – YiFei
    Jan 23, 2017 at 7:39
  • right; and the API maintains this container for you. Jan 23, 2017 at 8:10
  • @Richard Hodges; agree, that's why the first two words are "where available", and tread_local does not work for non-static members; However, where pthread is available, it is well known and well applied. Jan 23, 2017 at 9:04
  • @StephanLechner thread_local does work for non-static members, if you keep a thread specific map, which can be done entirely in portable c++. Jan 23, 2017 at 9:29
  • pthread_getspecific and pthread_setspecific take a pthread_key_t obtained from pthread_key_create, not a long. This answer has badly incorrect and unsafe usage; it may appear to work the same way casting a random integer to a pointer and using it as an address may appear to work, but it doesn't. May 3 at 17:32

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