3

I would like to get the area under a curve using ggplot2. The problem is that I have just discrete values (measurements, dependent variable) on a continuous scale (time), but measurements are not equally distant. I am not interested in fitting a function (I tried for analysis) but just the area under the plot.

I know I could calculate means between x values and then do the "discrete integral". But I thought there might be an easier way to get just the area size, because I manage to draw the entire thing in ggplot2 using geom_area. So I get a neatly filled area, but is there any possibility of extracting the area size from geom_area?

EDIT: Below are some nice solutions to how to calculate the area under a curve where only discrete values are given. Still, if anyone knows if it's possible to extract the area size simply by geom_area I'm super curious to know!

Reproducible example:

mydata <- data.frame(time = c(2,4,6,8,19,24,30,43,48,69),
                     ratio = c(0.24, 1.04, 1.08, 1.27, 2.12, 2.13, 2.34, 2.00, 1.90, 1.96))

ggplot(data = mydata, aes(x = time, y = ratio))+
  geom_area(fill = "grey")+
  geom_point(colour = "red")+
  labs(title = "My sample data", y = "Ratio", x = "Time")

enter image description here

  • found a simple approach, which may be used with caution as I am not 100% sure if this function acts the same way- looks though as it does: auc from package flux (also in AUC) - calculates area under the curve for given x and y. In the desctription I read it uses the trapezoidal rule, which seems to approximate in the same way as @Axeman did. – Spreeprinte Jan 23 '17 at 16:33
2

To get the area size , i have used rgeos library. Try this

# load the rgeos library
library(rgeos)

# make a polygon (borrowed from ref manual for package)
sample_polygon <- readWKT("POLYGON((2 0,2 0.24,4 1.04,6 1.08,8 1.27,19 2.12,24 2.13,30 2.34,43 2.00,48 1.90,69 1.96,69 0,2 0))")

# and calculate the area
gArea(sample_polygon)
[1] 126.92
  • Nice one! The only thing ist, how do I paste my data into the form that's read by readWKT? – Spreeprinte Jan 23 '17 at 16:32
1

Consider the area of the grey polygon between subsequent points. It consists of two shapes,

  • A rectagle with a height from y = 0 up to the lower of the two y values, with width x1 - x0.
  • A triangle with a height that is the difference between y0 and y1, and width x1 - x0.

enter image description here

If we calculate those areas for each subsequent pair of points, we can sum those together for the total area.

mydata %>% 
  arrange(time) %>% 
  mutate(area_rectangle = (lead(time) - time) * pmin(ratio, lead(ratio)),
         area_triangle = 0.5 * (lead(time) - time) * abs(ratio - lead(ratio))) %>% 
  summarise(area = sum(area_rectangle + area_triangle, na.rm = TRUE))
    area
1 126.92
  • Thanks for the answer, I understand the mathematics as this was how I thought doing it first, but then didn't know how to do that smartly in R. Played around with loops but didn't trust my results. So your code looks nicely short, however I tried it out and it didn't work...is lead your own function? What does %>% mean? – Spreeprinte Jan 23 '17 at 16:15
  • lead is in dplyr. The %>% is a pipe to chain functions together. I.e. f(a, b) is the same as a %>% f(b). – Axeman Jan 23 '17 at 16:19
  • Got it. seems to be a big package, my notebook can't handle it right now...so gotta try later. Anyways, thanks for help! – Spreeprinte Jan 23 '17 at 16:31
1

We can compute the area with integration, by summing the areas under the lines too, as illustrated in the below code and the figures:

mydata <- data.frame(time = c(2,4,6,8,19,24,30,43,48,69),
                     ratio = c(0.24, 1.04, 1.08, 1.27, 2.12, 2.13, 2.34, 2.00, 1.90, 1.96))

ggplot(data = mydata, aes(x = time, y = ratio))+
  geom_area(fill = "grey")+
  geom_point(colour = "red")+
  geom_vline(xintercept=mydata$time) + 
  labs(title = "My sample data", y = "Ratio", x = "Time") 

enter image description here

get.line.slope <- function(x1, y1, x2, y2) {
  (y2 - y1) / (x2 - x1)
}

get.line.intercept <- function(x1, y1, x2, y2) {
  y1 - (y2 - y1)*x1 / (x2 - x1)
}

st.lines <- as.data.frame(t(sapply(1:(nrow(mydata)-1), 
  function(i) c(
    m=get.line.slope(mydata$time[i],mydata$ratio[i], mydata$time[i+1], mydata$ratio[i+1]),
    c=get.line.intercept(mydata$time[i],mydata$ratio[i], mydata$time[i+1], mydata$ratio[i+1]),
    startx=mydata$time[i],
    endx=mydata$time[i+1]))))   

st.lines # as can be seen there are 9 st. lines with slope m, intercept c
# we have to find the area under each line from left vertical line at startx to 
# right vertical line at endx

#              m          c startx endx
# 1  0.400000000 -0.5600000      2    4
# 2  0.020000000  0.9600000      4    6
# 3  0.095000000  0.5100000      6    8
# 4  0.077272727  0.6518182      8   19
# 5  0.002000000  2.0820000     19   24
# 6  0.035000000  1.2900000     24   30
# 7 -0.026153846  3.1246154     30   43
# 8 -0.020000000  2.8600000     43   48
# 9  0.002857143  1.7628571     48   69

ggplot(data = mydata, aes(x = time, y = ratio))+
  geom_area(fill = "grey")+
  geom_point(colour = "red")+
  geom_vline(xintercept=mydata$time) + 
  geom_abline(data=st.lines, aes(slope=m, intercept=c), col='blue', lty=2) +
  labs(title = "My sample data", y = "Ratio", x = "Time") 

enter image description here

# compute the area under each of the blue dotted lines in between the black vertical lines
areas <- apply(st.lines, 1, function(l) 
         integrate(f=function(x)l['m']*x+l['c'], 
         lower = l['startx'], upper=l['endx'])$value)
areas
# [1]  1.280  2.120  2.350 18.645 10.625 13.410 28.210  9.750 40.530

# total area under the polygon
sum(areas)
# [1] 126.92
  • wow, what a code! I'm impressed of how many different approaches there are. To be honest, I'll stick to the easier/faster solutions above, as I have to calculate the are a few times... thanks anyway for the effort! – Spreeprinte Jan 23 '17 at 20:28
  • Thanks @Spreeprinte, but the above code is fast and also conceptually easy to understand I guess. – Sandipan Dey Jan 23 '17 at 20:31

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