5

I broke out some code from a larger block and need to pass a worksheet to it...

I'm not assigning any new value to the worksheet, but I am making changes to the Page Break settings for that sheet. Do I need to pass it as ByRef, or is ByVal good enough?

Private Sub SetPageBreaks(ByRef wsReport As Worksheet)
Dim ZoomNum As Integer

  wsReport.Activate
  ActiveWindow.View = xlPageBreakPreview
  ActiveSheet.ResetAllPageBreaks
  ZoomNum = 85
  With ActiveSheet
    Select Case wsReport.Name
      Case "Compare"
        Set .VPageBreaks(1).Location = Range("AI1")
        ZoomNum = 70
      Case "GM"
        .VPageBreaks.Add before:=Range("X1")
      Case "Drift"
        .VPageBreaks.Add before:=Range("T1")
      Case Else
        .VPageBreaks.Add before:=Range("U1")
    End Select
  End With
  ActiveWindow.View = xlNormalView
  ActiveWindow.Zoom = ZoomNum

End Sub
9

Either will work, but for semantically correct code, prefer passing it by value (ByVal).

When you pass an object variable by value, you're passing a copy of the pointer to the object.

So what the procedure is working with is the same object (i.e. changed property values will be seen by the caller), except it's not allowed to Set the pointer to something else - well it can, but it'll do that on its own copy and so the caller won't be affected.

Public Sub DoSomething()
    Dim target As Worksheet
    Set target = ActiveSheet
    Debug.Print ObjPtr(target)
    DoSomethingElse target
    Debug.Print ObjPtr(target)
End Sub

Private Sub DoSomethingElse(ByVal target As Worksheet)
    Debug.Print ObjPtr(target)
    Set target = Worksheets("Sheet12")
    Debug.Print ObjPtr(target)
    'in DoSomething, target still refers to the ActiveSheet
End Sub

On the other hand...

Public Sub DoSomething()
    Dim target As Worksheet
    Set target = ActiveSheet
    Debug.Print ObjPtr(target)
    DoSomethingElse target
    Debug.Print ObjPtr(target)
End Sub

Private Sub DoSomethingElse(ByRef target As Worksheet)
    Debug.Print ObjPtr(target)
    Set target = Worksheets("Sheet12")
    Debug.Print ObjPtr(target)
    'in DoSomething, target now refers to Worksheets("Sheet12")
End Sub

In general, parameters should be passed by value. It's just an unfortunate language quirk that ByRef is the default (VB.NET fixed that).

The same is true for non-object variables:

Public Sub DoSomething()
    Dim foo As Long
    foo = 42
    DoSomethingElse foo
End Sub

Private Sub DoSomethingElse(ByVal foo As Long)
    foo = 12
    'in DoSomething, foo is still 42
End Sub

And...

Public Sub DoSomething()
    Dim foo As Long
    foo = 42
    DoSomethingElse foo
End Sub

Private Sub DoSomethingElse(ByRef foo As Long)
    foo = 12
    'in DoSomething, foo is now 12
End Sub

If a variable is passed by reference, but is never reassigned in the body of a procedure, then it can be passed by value.

If a variable is passed by reference, and reassigns it in the body of a procedure, then that procedure could likely be written as a Function, and actually return the modified value instead.

If a variable is passed by value, and is reassigned in the body of a procedure, then the caller isn't going to see the changes - which makes code suspicious; if a procedure needs to reassign a ByVal parameter value, the intent of the code becomes clearer if it defines its own local variable and assigns that instead of the ByVal parameter:

Public Sub DoSomething()
    Dim foo As Long
    foo = 42
    DoSomethingElse foo
End Sub

Private Sub DoSomethingElse(ByVal foo As Long)
    Dim bar As Long
    bar = foo
    '...
    bar = 12
    '...
End Sub

These are all actual code inspections in Rubberduck, as VBE add-in I'm heavily involved with, that can analyze your code and see these things:

ByVal parameter is assigned

Parameter is passed by value, but is assigned a new value/reference. Consider making a local copy instead if the caller isn't supposed to know the new value. If the caller should see the new value, the parameter should be passed ByRef instead, and you have a bug.

http://rubberduckvba.com/Inspections/Details/AssignedByValParameterInspection

Procedure can be written as a function

A procedure that only has one parameter passed by reference that is assigned a new value/reference before the procedure exits, is using a ByRef parameter as a return value: consider making it a function instead.

http://rubberduckvba.com/Inspections/Details/ProcedureCanBeWrittenAsFunctionInspection

Parameter can be passed by value

A parameter that is passed by reference and isn't assigned a new value/reference, could be passed by value instead.

http://rubberduckvba.com/Inspections/Details/ParameterCanBeByValInspection

That's the case of wsReport here:

Parameter 'wsReport' can be passed by value

|improve this answer|||||
  • I use Rubberduck, and that is what prompted me to think about the question. While the worksheet variable was never assigned a new value (ByVal would be fine), the fact that changes were being made to the sheet (changes would normally require ByRef) made me wonder if ByVal was the best practice for passing an object. – Rdster Jan 23 '17 at 20:27
  • 3
    @Rdster Changes are made to the sheet because the copy of the pointer points to the same worksheet, so changes made to the sheet do "propagate" - it is the same object. But if you pass it ByRef then the procedure can set it to Nothing and when it returns to the caller then the caller lost the pointer, because ByRef allowed the pointer to be Set to something else. ..hope that makes sense. also, yay Rubberduck! – Mathieu Guindon Jan 23 '17 at 20:35
  • @Rdster FWIW I think my answer would have been more focused if the question was tagged with rubberduck and asking specifically why Rubberduck suggests passing objects by value (I mean, yeah, there's a Rubberduck tag on SO!) - don't hesitate to ask about any other inspection! – Mathieu Guindon Jan 23 '17 at 21:05
  • Hi Mathieu. Are you saying that for Worksheets and any other Office objects, what is actually happening is that the reference is made to an object which itself points to the Worksheet? So that in essence what we pass ByVal MyVar as Worksheet is not a copy of the Worksheet object to which MyVar would point, but a copy of an intermediate object? And so MyVar points to that intermediate object, which itself points to the Worksheet? – Ama Mar 31 '19 at 23:06
  • 1
    @Ama there's no intermediate object.. what I'm saying is that there's a difference between an object and a pointer to that object - what gets copied or passed around is the pointer, not the object. – Mathieu Guindon Mar 31 '19 at 23:08

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