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I am having a problem with a production WordPress site whereby the login cookie system seems to be extremely fragile. If the site is open in one browser (e.g. Edge) and is then also logged in from the same user account in another browser (e.g. Firefox), the first session is logged out.  Sometimes this even happens in two tabs in the same browser; the first tab is logged out if a second is opened. Login sessions also seem to expire at random while members are browsing the site; some members (especially in Chrome or Firefox; not so much Edge or IE or Safari) find that if logged out they cannot log back in as the WP site appears to freeze on the login screen.  Firefox may also put up an error that there were too many redirects, though no other browsers exhibit this issue.

This is a private site for my company's clients so there is not a way to open it up to allow browsing.  I will need to provide code, screenshots, and anything requested by anyone who is willing to help out, but cannot allow just anyone to browse the site as the members-only site contains and allows access to sensitive information. The site is hosted in an AWS environment using a MariaDB RDS instance. It is a multisite with one other similar members-only website.  

==UPDATE==

Here is what has been determined so far by additional analysis.

I use Sucuri Firewall and here are the errors on their end: "Something on the hosting server is returning a 499 error:

24.111.XX.XX 24/Jan/2017:15:18:32      NOT BLOCKED      POST      499      /wp-login.php      CACHEP:-      https://www.DOMAIN.com/wp-login.php      

Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/7.0; rv:11.0) like Gecko

This would not be coming from us as we only generated 403 errors when we block something. You would need to contact your web hosting provider and provide them with this log:

24.111.XX.XX - - [24/Jan/2017:15:18:32 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 499 0 "https://www.DOMAIN.com/wp-login.php"; "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/7.0; rv:11.0) like Gecko" "PROXYBLOCKID:" "CACHEP:-"

They should be familiar with that. Our logs are -5 GMT so that they can correlate with the times on their server. There should be something showing up around that time in the server error logs detailing why it is returning a 499 error.

===============

Here are equivalent errors from my Apache logs.

[Mon Jan 23 15:36:57.376276 2017] [core:error] [pid 16776:tid 139624714282752] [client 192.88.135.6:42784] AH00124: Request exceeded the limit of 10 internal redirects due to probable configuration error. Use 'LimitInternalRecursion' to increase the limit if necessary. Use 'LogLevel debug' to get a backtrace., referer: https://www.DOMAIN.com/wp-login.php?redirect_to=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.DOMAIN.com%2F&reauth=1


[Mon Jan 23 15:37:12.552224 2017] [core:error] [pid 22735:tid 139624386967296] [client 185.93.229.6:14141] AH00124: Request exceeded the limit of 10 internal redirects due to probable configuration error. Use 'LimitInternalRecursion' to increase the limit if necessary. Use 'LogLevel debug' to get a backtrace., referer: https://www.DOMAIN.com/wp-login.php?redirect_to=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.DOMAIN.com%2F&reauth=1

Both are Sucuri IP addresses.

=========================

And here is my htaccess.

RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /
RewriteRule ^index\.php$ - [L]

# add a trailing slash to /wp-admin
RewriteRule ^([_0-9a-zA-Z-]+/)?wp-admin$ $1wp-admin/ [R=301,L]

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -f [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -d
RewriteRule ^ - [L]
RewriteRule ^([_0-9a-zA-Z-]+/)?(wp-(content|admin|includes).*) $2 [L]
RewriteRule ^([_0-9a-zA-Z-]+/)?(.*\.php)$ $2 [L]
RewriteRule . index.php [L] 
  • "We are also willing to pay someone" That's a good thing, don't get me wrong... but I don't believe the Stack Exchange sites are the right venue for soliciting a consultant, nor do I suspect that Stack Overflow is the right venue among SE for questions that do not present enough information to identify whether there is indeed a programming-related issue involved. Request and response header captures and any log entries or output from debugging you've added, at a minimum, seem like something we'd need to see (and indeed might make it obvious). – Michael - sqlbot Jan 24 '17 at 1:41
  • I've updated the posting to resolve these issues. – J Nelson Jan 25 '17 at 13:51
  • Request exceeded the limit of 10 internal redirects due to probable configuration error. One of your rewrite rules changes the URL to something that also matches a rewriite rule, and you have an infinite loop (or excessively recursive number) of rewrites. Configure mod_rewrite for an increased log level and see what you can find. – Michael - sqlbot Jan 25 '17 at 14:00
  • Does it make sense why it only happens sporadically? I would have thought a redirect loop problem would happen all the time, not inconsistently and signing users out when it happens. Also, my rewrite rules are just WordPress defaults. – J Nelson Jan 26 '17 at 14:25
  • Not with the information available so far, no... but packet traces (tshark) should show you exactly where things break down. Note that if this is sporadic, then the breakdown may actually start during processing of an apparently successful request before the redirect error. Debugging the rewrite should at least tell you about the request URI that generates the error, and from there, you will want to investigate what prompts the browser to make such a request. – Michael - sqlbot Jan 26 '17 at 17:10

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