107

I'm using Cygwin GCC and run this code:

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

unsigned u = 0;

void foo()
{
    u++;
}

int main()
{
    vector<thread> threads;
    for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
        threads.push_back (thread (foo));
    }
    for (auto& t : threads) t.join();

    cout << u << endl;
    return 0;
}

Compiled with the line: g++ -Wall -fexceptions -g -std=c++14 -c main.cpp -o main.o.

It prints 1000, which is correct. However, I expected a lesser number due to threads overwriting a previously incremented value. Why does this code not suffer from mutual access?

My test machine has 4 cores, and I put no restrictions on the program that I know of.

The problem persists when replacing the content of the shared foo with something more complex, e.g.

if (u % 3 == 0) {
    u += 4;
} else {
    u -= 1;
}
  • 66
    Intel CPUs have some amazing internal "shoot down" logic to preserve compatibility with very early x86 CPUs used in SMP systems (like dual Pentium Pro machines). Lots of failure conditions that we are taught are possible almost never actually happen on x86 machines. So say a core goes to write u back to memory. The CPU will actually do amazing things like notice that the memory line for u isn't in the CPU's cache and it will restart the increment operation. This is why going from x86 to other architectures can be an eye opening experience! – David Schwartz Jan 23 '17 at 22:05
  • 1
    Maybe still too quick. You need to add code to ensure that the thread yields before it does anything to ensure that other threads get launched before it completes. – Rob K Jan 23 '17 at 22:10
  • 1
    As has been elsewhere noted, the thread code is so short it may well be executed before the next thread is queued. How about 10 threads that place u++ in a 100 count loop. And a short delay within for prior to start of the loop (or a global "go" flag to start them all at the same time) – RufusVS Jan 24 '17 at 18:45
  • 5
    Actually, spawning the program repeatedly in a loop eventually shows that it breaks : something like while true; do res=$(./a.out); if [[ $res != 1000 ]]; then echo $res; break; fi; done; prints 999 or 998 on my system. – Daniel Kamil Kozar Jan 24 '17 at 18:50
268

foo() is so short that each thread probably finishes before the next one even gets spawned. If you add a sleep for a random time in foo() before the u++, you may start seeing what you expect.

  • 51
    This indeed changed the output in the expected way. – mafu Jan 23 '17 at 22:33
  • 49
    I would note that this is in general a rather good strategy for exhibiting race conditions. You should be able to inject a pause between any two operations; if not, there's a race condition. – Matthieu M. Jan 24 '17 at 8:01
  • We had just this issue with C# recently. Code almost never failed usually, but the recent addition of an API call in between introduced enough delay to make it consistently change. – Obsidian Phoenix Jan 25 '17 at 14:01
  • @MatthieuM. Doesn't Microsoft have an automated tool that does exactly that, as a method of both detecting race conditions and making them reliably reproducible? – Mason Wheeler Jan 25 '17 at 18:51
  • 1
    @MasonWheeler: I work nigh exclusively on Linux, so... dunno :( – Matthieu M. Jan 25 '17 at 19:02
59

It is important to understand a race condition does not guarantee the code will run incorrectly, merely that it could do anything, as it is an undefined behavior. Including running as expected.

Particularly on X86 and AMD64 machines race conditions in some cases rarely cause issues as many of the instructions are atomic and the coherency guarantees are very high. These guarantees are somewhat reduced on multi processor systems where the lock prefix is needed for many instructions to be atomic.

If on your machine increment is an atomic op, this will likely run correctly even though according to the language standard it is Undefined Behavior.

Specifically I expect in this case the code may be being compiled to an atomic Fetch and Add instruction (ADD or XADD in X86 assembly) which is indeed atomic in single processor systems, however on multiprocessor systems this is not guaranteed to be atomic and a lock would be required to make it so. If you are running on a multiprocessor system there will be a window where threads could interfere and produce incorrect results.

Specifically I compiled your code to assembly using https://godbolt.org/ and foo() compiles to:

foo():
        add     DWORD PTR u[rip], 1
        ret

This means it is solely performing an add instruction which for a single processor will be atomic (though as mentioned above not so for a multi processor system).

  • 41
    It's important to remember that "running as intended" is a permissible outcome of undefined behavior. – Mark Jan 23 '17 at 23:34
  • 3
    As you indicated, this instruction is not atomic on an SMP machine (which all modern systems are). Even inc [u] is not atomic. The LOCK prefix is required to make an instruction truly atomic. The OP is simply getting lucky. Recall that even though you're telling the CPU "add 1 to the word at this address", the CPU still has to fetch, increment, store that value and another CPU can do the same thing simultaneously, causing the result to be incorrect. – Jonathon Reinhart Jan 24 '17 at 1:09
  • 2
    I down-voted, but then I re-read your question and realized that your atomicity statements were assuming a single CPU. If you edit your question to make this more clear (when you say "atomic", be clear that this is only the case on a single CPU), then I will be able to remove my down-vote. – Jonathon Reinhart Jan 24 '17 at 1:10
  • 3
    Downvoted, i find this claim a bit meh "Particularly on X86 and AMD64 machines race conditions in some cases rarely cause issues as many of the instructions are atomic and the coherency guarantees are very high." The paragraph should start making the explicit assumption that you're focusing on single core. Even so, multi-core architectures are de-facto standard nowadays in consumer devices that I would consider this a corner case to explain last, rather than first. – Patrick Trentin Jan 24 '17 at 6:49
  • 3
    Oh, definitely. x86 has tons of backwards-compatibility…stuff to make sure that incorrectly-written code works to the extent possible. It was a really big deal when the Pentium Pro introduced out-of-order execution. Intel wanted to make sure that the installed base of code worked without needing to be recompiled specifically for their new chip. x86 started out as a CISC core, but has internally evolved into a RISC core, although it still presents and behaves in many ways as CISC from a programmer's perspective. For more, see Peter Cordes's answer here. – Cody Gray Jan 24 '17 at 7:35
20

I think it is not so much the thing if you put a sleep before or after the u++. It is rather that operation u++ translates to code that is - compared to the overhead of spawning threads that call foo - very quickly performed such that it is unlikely to get intercepted. However, if you "prolong" the operation u++, then the race condition will become much more likely:

void foo()
{
    unsigned i = u;
    for (int s=0;s<10000;s++);
    u = i+1;
}

result: 694


BTW: I also tried

if (u % 2) {
    u += 2;
} else {
    u -= 1;
}

and it gave me most times 1997, but sometimes 1995.

  • 1
    I would expect on any vaguely sane compiler that whole function would be optimized to the same thing. I am surprised it wasn't. Thank you for the interesting result. – Vality Jan 23 '17 at 22:31
  • This is exactly correct. Many thousands of instructions need to run before the next thread starts executing the tiny function in question. When you make the execution time in the function closer to the thread creation overhead, you see the impact of the race condition. – Jonathon Reinhart Jan 24 '17 at 1:05
  • @Vality: I also expected it to delete the spurious for-loop under O3 optimization. It doesn't? – user21820 Jan 24 '17 at 8:23
  • How could else u -= 1 ever be executed? Even in a parallel environment the value should never not fit %2, doesn't it? – mafu Jan 24 '17 at 14:51
  • 2
    from the output, it looks like else u -= 1 is executed once, the first time foo() is called, when u == 0. The remaining 999 times u is odd and u += 2 is executed resulting in u = -1 + 999 * 2 = 1997; i.e. the correct output. A race condition sometimes causes one of the +=2 to be overwritten by a parallel thread and you get 1995. – Luke Jan 24 '17 at 18:08
7

It does suffer from a race condition. Put usleep(1000); before u++; in foo and I see different output (< 1000) each time.

6
  1. The likely answer to why the race condition didn't manifest for you, though it does exist, is that foo() is so fast, compared to the time it takes to start a thread, that each thread finishes before the next can even start. But...

  2. Even with your original version, the result varies by system: I tried it your way on a (quad-core) Macbook, and in ten runs, I got 1000 three times, 999 six times, and 998 once. So the race is somewhat rare, but clearly present.

  3. You compiled with '-g', which has a way of making bugs disappear. I recompiled your code, still unchanged but without the '-g', and the race became much more pronounced: I got 1000 once, 999 three times, 998 twice, 997 twice, 996 once, and 992 once.

  4. Re. the suggestion of adding a sleep -- that helps, but (a) a fixed sleep time leaves the threads still skewed by start time (subject to timer resolution), and (b) a random sleep spreads them out when what we want is to pull them closer together. Instead, I'd code them to wait for a start signal, so I can create them all before letting them get to work. With this version (with or without '-g'), I get results all over place, as low as 974, and no higher than 998:

    #include <iostream>
    #include <thread>
    #include <vector>
    using namespace std;
    
    unsigned u = 0;
    bool start = false;
    
    void foo()
    {
        while (!start) {
            std::this_thread::yield();
        }
        u++;
    }
    
    int main()
    {
        vector<thread> threads;
        for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
            threads.push_back (thread (foo));
        }
        start = true;
        for (auto& t : threads) t.join();
    
        cout << u << endl;
        return 0;
    }
    
  • Just a note. The -g flag does not in any way "make bugs disappear." The -g flag on both GNU and Clang compilers simply adds debug symbols to the compiled binary. This allows you to run diagnostic tools like GDB and Memcheck on your programs with some human readable output. For example when Memcheck is run over a program with a memory leak it will not tell you the line number unless the program was built using the -g flag. – MS-DDOS Jan 26 '17 at 0:50
  • Granted, bugs hiding from the debugger is usually more a matter of compiler optimization; I should have tried, and said, "using -O2 instead of -g". But that said, if you've never had the joy of hunting a bug that would manifest only when compiled without -g, consider yourself fortunate. It can happen, with some of the very nastiest of subtle aliasing bugs. I have seen it, though not recently, and I could believe maybe it was a quirk of an old proprietary compiler, so I'll believe you, provisionally, about modern versions of GNU and Clang. – dgould Jan 27 '17 at 19:35
  • -g doesn't stop you from using optimizations. e.g. gcc -O3 -g makes the same asm as gcc -O3, but with debug metadata. gdb will say "optimized out" if you try to print some variables, though. -g could maybe change the relative locations of some things in memory, if any of the stuff it adds is part of the .text section. It definitely takes space in the object file, but I think after linking it all ends up at one end of the text segment (not section), or not part of a segment at all. Maybe could affect where things are mapped for dynamic libraries. – Peter Cordes Jul 12 '17 at 21:41

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.