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I clone my repository with:

git clone ssh://xxxxx/xx.git 

But after I change some files and add and commit them, I want to push them to the server:

git add xxx.php
git commit -m "TEST"
git push origin master

But the error I get back is:

error: src refspec master does not match any.  
error: failed to push some refs to 'ssh://xxxxx.com/project.git'
15
  • 49
    @Marco That's not a duplicate. That one is a very specific issue about pushing a local branch to a remote branch. This one is about initializing a repo and pushing it up. They produce the same error, but the REASONS they produce that error and the fixes are entirely different. Also, sinoohe, you should accept an answer. Probably the first one, seeing as it answers the question and has helped over 350 people. Jul 8 '13 at 0:42
  • 3
    Hope this post would be useful to somebody- samranga.blogspot.com/2015/07/… The error in the question can be popped even when tried to Create a git BitBucket repository from an already locally existing project Jul 2 '15 at 13:00
  • 24
    Yet another simple task made difficult by Git. The Git devs should use Stack Overflow as feedback in their SDLC loop. 850,000+ people should indicate something is seriously wrong with Git's workflow. They need to hire a UX expert because they clearly cannot git it right on their own.
    – jww
    Sep 16 '17 at 9:28
  • 4
    If you didnt add git add with dot or some files this error also will appear.
    – Blasanka
    Apr 28 '18 at 10:18
  • 13
    Recently Github/Git does not have a default "master" branch. "master" has been changed to "main" branch. So this may be a possible reason for this error.
    – Harini Sj
    Nov 23 '20 at 4:39

113 Answers 113

18

I have faced the same issue,

solved my problem.

just make a branch:

git checkout -b "master"

after that

git push -u origin master

bomm.

hope it will be solved.

1
  • I got the same issue and realized that branch was on main. then I followed this and got resolved.
    – Harish
    Nov 3 at 23:07
17

I was facing the same issue and tried most of the answers here, But the issue was because of recent changes of Github renaming.

GitHub is gradually renaming the default branch of repositories from master to main.

https://github.com/github/renaming

Your new command would be :

git push origin main

instead of this :

git push origin master
1
  • Thanks, this works for me. other solutions didn't. Jun 26 at 3:59
15

I had the same problem. I did it by the following steps:

1. git commit -m 'message'
2. git config --global user.email "your mail"
3. git config --global user.name "name"
4. git commit -m 'message'
5. git push -u origin master
15

In the scenario where you check out the code from an external repository (GitHub), and want to import it in personal / internal system, this command really shines:

git push --all origin

This pushes all local branches to the remote, without checking refs and without insisting on commits.

0
15

In 2021 github changed the default branch name to main previously it was master, i suffered because i tried to push to master which did not exist and the branch at remote was main instead, make sure you are using correct branch name.

command below worked for me

git push origin main
13

This will also happen if you have a typo in the branch name you're trying to push.

1
  • 3
    I suspect a great many of us who came here via web search actually mistyped the name!
    – sage
    Jun 23 '14 at 2:49
12
git add .

is all you need. That code tracks all untracked files in your directory.

12

In case if you are facing this problem even after doing git init and pushing your initial commit. You can then try the following,

git checkout -b "new branch name"
git push origin "new branch name"

Your code will be pushed as a new branch.

0
11

In end of 2020, GitHub changed its master branch to main branch

I noticed GitHub created a new branch master and this not the main branch when I am using git push -u origin master:

Now when I try to use git push -u origin main, to push directly to main branch it gives me this error:

I faced this error:

src refspec main does not match any
error: failed to push some refs to 'https://github.com/<my_project_name>.git

I fixed using these steps after my first commit to main.Change URL for your GitHub in the following code:

git branch -M main
git remote add origin https://github.com/Sidrah-Madiha/<my_project_url>.git
git push -u origin main
1
10

You need to configure your Git installation if it is the first time that you use it, with:

git config --global user.email "you@example.com"

git config --global user.name "Your Name"
0
10

Double check that you're pushing the correct branch name. I encountered the same error and after looking at git show-ref I was able to see I was typing it in wrong, therefore, no ref.

10

git push -u origin master

error: src refspec master does not match any.
error: failed to push some refs to 'http://REPO.git'

This is caused by the repository still being empty. There are no commits in the repository and thus no master branch to push to the server.

It worked for me

Resolution

1) git init
2)git commit -m "first commit"
3)git add app
4)git commit -m "first commit"
5)git push -u origin master
0
10

Github changed the default branch name from master to main. So if you created the repo recently, try pushing main branch

git push origin main

Github Article

0
9

I forgot to do a "git pull origin master" after commit and before push and it caused the same problem: "src refspec master does not match any when pushing commits in git".

So, you should do:

1. git add .
2. git pull origin master
3. git commit -am "Init commit"
4. git push origin master
9

This error occurs as you are trying to push an empty repo into the git server. This can be mitigated by initializing a README.md file :

cat > README.md

Then type something, followed by an enter, and a CTRL+D to save. Then the usual committing steps :

git add .
git commit -m "Initial commit"
git push origin master
9

To avoid getting into this error in 2021 and onwards, use this command before using git init

git config --global init.defaultBranch main This tells your git to use main as the default branch name always, instead of master

8

Try this:

git add .

git commit -m "your commit message"

git remote add origin *remote repository URL*

git push origin *your-branch-name*
8

Only commit solved this error:

git commit -m "first commit"
7

I was getting this error because my local branchname did not match the new remote branch I was trying to create with git push origin <<branchname>>.

7

In my case I cloned a repository, but I didn't switch to the branch locally.

I solved it by doing this:

Before making changes in code you should do this:

git checkout branch-name

Then make changes to your code

After that push the code to the branch:

git push -u origin branch-name

Also, if you are pushing your local repository first time to GitHub, you need to first create a main branch:

git branch -M main

And, then, after adding the origin (or whatever name you give to your remote) push the branch:

git push -u origin main
7

Make sure you are pushing to the right branch or is there any typo. check out your current working branch name with this command
git show-branch

1
  • 1
    Had the same problem and it turn out that I typo branch name.
    – Pyae
    Jun 26 '20 at 3:32
6

Another possible cause of this problem is if you misspell the branch name. So if you did what I did then the problem would be fixed by correcting:

git push origin mater

to

git push origin master
6

This worked for me, resetting to remote master the repository:

git checkout master
git commit -a -m "your comment"
git push origin master
0
6

I got this problem while adding an empty directory. Git doesn't allow to push an empty directory. Here is a simple solution.

Create the file .gitkeep inside of directory you want to push to remote and commit the "empty" directory from the command line:

touch your-directory/.gitkeep
git add your-directory/.gitkeep
git commit -m "Add empty directory"
6

Check your commit title, because if you forget the git commit -m "xxxx" command, you get the same problem

git commit -m "initial commit"
1
  • 1
    No, I mean if you forget git commit -m "xxxx" command, you get the same problem.Thank you I edited my comment Apr 3 '18 at 19:47
6

I did face the same problem, but in my case the following the exact steps from the beginning as given on the page when you create a new repository worked.

Just pasting that over here:

  echo "# YYYY" >> README.md
  git init
  git add README.md
  git commit -m "first commit"
  git remote add origin https://github.com/XXXX/YYYY.git
  git push -u origin master

Type the above in Git Bash. XXXX being the username and YYYY the repository name.

0
6

What worked for me was simply checkout to the branch that I want my code to push and then simply push your code.

git checkout -b branchname-on-which-i-will-push-my-code

git add .
git commit -m "my commit message"
git push origin branchname-on-which-i-will-push-my-code
5

I ran into the same snag..and the solution was to push the code to the repo as though it were an existing project and not a brand new one being initialised.

git remote add origin https://github.com/Name/reponame.git
git branch -M main
git push -u origin main
5

Try git show-ref

You might see refs/heads/live

This means you should do

git push -u origin live
3
  • 1
    I think you mean "main" not "live". As of June 2020 they've dropped "master" in favor of "main. Oct 10 '20 at 2:13
  • Hi @JosephBrenner, I already removed the reference to Github. Oct 13 '20 at 3:28
  • 1
    Tried this solution and got refs/heads/master. Then git push origin master worked.
    – Jacobs2000
    Nov 6 '20 at 8:37
5

First of all make sure that you are using master branch. In my case branch was main instead of master. So what I did was

git push origin main

You can see the result in this photo

Git problem

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