117

How to check whether a system is big endian or little endian?

1

20 Answers 20

121

In C, C++

int n = 1;
// little endian if true
if(*(char *)&n == 1) {...}

See also: Perl version

7
  • 17
    Good answer, but this provides a nice diagram of what's going on: stackoverflow.com/a/12792301/803801
    – gsgx
    Commented Oct 15, 2013 at 23:17
  • 4
    Can you tell me why we can't just use (char)n == 1 ? Why do we have to get the address, convert it to a char pointer and then dereference? Won't this be implicitly done (char)n is used?
    – J...S
    Commented Dec 28, 2018 at 11:52
  • @J...S Just using a char cast seems to work fine. I haven't tested it on a big-endian system though. Commented Mar 3, 2019 at 21:36
  • 6
    Just using a char does not work. As casting to char causes the system to convert from an int to a char. It will always return true. Using a cast to pointer and de-reference places the pointer to the first byte of N and then de-references the first byte.
    – Pliny
    Commented Feb 14, 2020 at 18:31
  • 2
    A cast isn't a conversion. If Big Endian, then the first byte of N is a zero - so how does that result in true?
    – belwood
    Commented Feb 14, 2020 at 19:19
76

In Python:

from sys import byteorder
print(byteorder)
# will print 'little' if little endian
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18

Another C code using union

union {
    int i;
    char c[sizeof(int)];
} x;
x.i = 1;
if(x.c[0] == 1)
    printf("little-endian\n");
else    printf("big-endian\n");

It is same logic that belwood used.

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  • 3
    i think this is not standard compliant though: you may only read the field from an enum that you last have written to otherwise undefined behavior is possible, or am i mistaken?
    – worenga
    Commented Mar 14, 2016 at 11:53
  • 1
    unions does not specify "justifying" in standard. This is not correct solution (it may work accidentally in specific OS/compiller). Commented Dec 30, 2016 at 19:46
  • Can some please explain the logic in the above program. If initialising the member variable i, with x.1=1, then how x.c[0] is turning out to be 1. Am I missing some point here? my understanding is that union take the memory of the largest data type and depending upon that we can access it. Only one member can be accessed. Any response will be highly appreaciated Commented Feb 13, 2018 at 8:44
  • 1
    @VivekSingh as you said union take the memory of the largest data type and depending upon that we can access it. So the memory will be same for both the data types. So we are accessing as int and assigning it as 1. So in 4 byte only 1 byte part will have single 1. When we access as char it takes only 1 byte.
    – Neeraj
    Commented Feb 20, 2018 at 7:15
18

In C++20 use std::endian:

#include <bit>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    if constexpr (std::endian::native == std::endian::little)
        std::cout << "little-endian";
    else if constexpr (std::endian::native == std::endian::big)
        std::cout << "big-endian";
    else
        std::cout << "mixed-endian";
}
15

A one-liner with Perl (which should be installed by default on almost all systems):

perl -e 'use Config; print $Config{byteorder}'

If the output starts with a 1 (least-significant byte), it's a little-endian system. If the output starts with a higher digit (most-significant byte), it's a big-endian system. See documentation of the Config module.

12

If you are using .NET: Check the value of BitConverter.IsLittleEndian.

9

In Rust (no crates or use statements required)

In a function body:

if cfg!(target_endian = "big") {
    println!("Big endian");
} else {
    println!("Little endian");
}

Outside a function body:

#[cfg(target_endian = "big")]
fn print_endian() {
    println!("Big endian")
}

#[cfg(target_endian = "little")]
fn print_endian() {
    println!("Little endian")
}

This is what the byteorder crate does internally: https://docs.rs/byteorder/1.3.2/src/byteorder/lib.rs.html#1877

0
7

In Powershell

[System.BitConverter]::IsLittleEndian
5

In case if you want to check it on a linux machine you can use below mentioned cmd

lscpu | grep "Byte Order"

After running this cmd you will get the output like mentioned below

Byte Order:            Little Endian

Hope it helps

1
  • Keep in mind that output from lscpu could be localized. So Byte Order could be translated to your local language.
    – Auktis
    Commented Nov 6, 2023 at 14:53
4

In Linux,

static union { char c[4]; unsigned long mylong; } endian_test = { { 'l', '?', '?', 'b' } };
#define ENDIANNESS ((char)endian_test.mylong)

if (ENDIANNESS == 'l') /* little endian */
if (ENDIANNESS == 'b') /* big endian */
1
  • 1
    how is it different from Neeraj's version?
    – phuclv
    Commented Jul 29, 2016 at 9:56
3

A C++ solution:

namespace sys {

const unsigned one = 1U;

inline bool little_endian()
{
    return reinterpret_cast<const char*>(&one) + sizeof(unsigned) - 1;
}

inline bool big_endian()
{
    return !little_endian();
}

} // sys

int main()
{
    if(sys::little_endian())
        std::cout << "little";
}
0
3

In Rust (byteorder crate required):

use std::any::TypeId;

let is_little_endian = TypeId::of::<byteorder::NativeEndian>() == TypeId::of::<byteorder::LittleEndian>();
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  • 1
    You don't need a crate now: #[cfg(target_endian = "little")] or if cfg!((target_endian = "little") will work.
    – Squirrel
    Commented Apr 23, 2021 at 19:08
2

Using Macro,

const int isBigEnd=1;
#define is_bigendian() ((*(char*)&isBigEnd) == 0)
2

In C

#include <stdio.h> 

/* function to show bytes in memory, from location start to start+n*/
void show_mem_rep(char *start, int n) 
 { 
      int i; 
      for (i = 0; i < n; i++) 
      printf("%2x ", start[i]); 
      printf("\n"); 
 } 

/*Main function to call above function for 0x01234567*/
int main() 
{ 
   int i = 0x01234567; 
   show_mem_rep((char *)&i, sizeof(i));  
   return 0; 
} 

When above program is run on little endian machine, gives “67 45 23 01” as output , while if it is run on big endian machine, gives “01 23 45 67” as output.

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  • 2
    Hey, man, It is not your own code, you just copy and paste. You should at least note the source of the code.
    – Hu Xixi
    Commented Apr 21, 2020 at 11:27
2

A compilable version of the top answer for n00bs:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int n = 1;

    // little endian if true
    if(*(char *)&n == 1) {
        printf("Little endian\n");
    } else {
        printf("Big endian\n");
    }   
}

Stick that in check-endianness.c and compile and run:

$ gcc -o check-endianness check-endianness.c
$ ./check-endianness

This whole command is a copy/pasteable bash script you can paste into your terminal:

cat << EOF > check-endianness.c
#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    int n = 1;
    // little endian if true
    if(*(char *)&n == 1) {
        printf("Little endian\n");
    } else {
        printf("Big endian\n");
    }   
}
EOF

gcc -o check-endianness check-endianness.c \
 && ./check-endianness \
 && rm check-endianness check-endianness.c

The code is in a gist here if you prefer. There is also a bash command that you can run that will generate, compile, and clean up after itself.

1

In Nim,

echo cpuEndian

It is exported from the system module.

1

In bash (from How to tell if a Linux system is big endian or little endian?):

endian=`echo -n "I" | od -to2 | head -n1 | cut -f2 -d" " | cut -c6`

if [ "$endian" == "1" ]; then
  echo "little-endian"
else
  echo "big-endian"
fi
1

C logic to check whether your processor follows little endian or big endian

unsigned int i =12345; 
char *c = (char *)&i; // typecast int to char* so that it points to first bit of int
if(*c != 0){          // If *c points to 0 then it is Big endian else Little endian
printf("Little endian");
}
else{
printf("Big endian");
}

Hope this helps. Was one of the question asked in my interview for the role of embedded software engineer role

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  • 1
    This is pretty similar in approach to the top answer and actually the same approach has been shown multiple times already. I don't see how this answer adds anything to what is already here.
    – DavidW
    Commented Aug 12, 2022 at 7:01
1

in C with GCC 9.4:

#include <endian.h>

#if __BYTE_ORDER == __LITTLE_ENDIAN
...
#endif

N.B. trap for the unwary : DON'T do this:

#ifdef __LITTLE_ENDIAN 

because both __LITTLE_ENDIAN and __BIG_ENDIAN are defined in endian.h! Also LITTLE_ENDIAN / BIG_ENDIAN (no leading underscores are defined)

0

In Java:

import java.nio.ByteOrder;

public class EndiannessCheck {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ByteOrder byteOrder = ByteOrder.nativeOrder();
        if (byteOrder.equals(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN)) {
            System.out.println("Little Endian");
        } else {
            System.out.println("Big Endian");
        }
    }
}

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