6

I try to use the raster reprojection of a map following this example. If I change the example kavrayskiy7 projection by the Azimuthal Equidistant projection,

var projection = d3.geo.azimuthalEquidistant()
    .scale(90)
    .translate([width / 2, height / 2])
    .clipAngle(180 - 1e-3)
    .precision(.1);

it should project the Earth onto a disc (the image of the projection map). However, the raster reprojection goes beyond that disc and fills the entire canvas with an extended picture (the inverse projection function is not injective, several x/y points on the map correspond to a single lon/lat coordinates). In the original example, this should be avoided with the line

if (λ > 180 || λ < -180 || φ > 90 || φ < -90) { i += 4; continue; }

but for this example that does not work. I found other glitches for instance when using the Mollweide projection (two lines appear at the poles) due to the same efect.

To solve this, one way would be to fix the inverse projections so they return error or None when the x/y input is out of range. My attempt was to check if a point is on range using the forward projection of the whole sphere to obtain a SVG path with the boundary of the map, as given by this code:

var path = d3.geo.path()
    .projection(projection);

var bdry = svg.append("defs").append("path")
    .datum({type: "Sphere"})
    .attr("id", "sphere")
    .attr("d", path);

(see for instance this example). However, I found no easy method to check whether a point [x,y] is inside a SVG closed path.

So my questions are:

  • Is there a bug on the inverse projections, or am I not using them correctly?
  • How could I find if a [x,y] point is inside the svg path, assuming that this is the best approach?
  • By curiosity, where is the algorithm code of the d3 path function to obtain the boundary profile of the map? I could not find it on the github repo.

Thanks.

Edit: I went through all the 44 projections in this example and I found glitches on the following 25:

Albers, Bromley, Collignon, Eckert II, Eckert IV, Eckert VI, Hammer, Hill, Goode Homolosine, Lambert cylindrical equal-area, Larrivée, Laskowski, McBryde–Thomas Flat-Polar Parabolic, McBryde–Thomas Flat-Polar Quartic, McBryde–Thomas Flat-Polar Sinusoidal, Mollweide, Natural Earth, Nell–Hammer, Polyconic, Sinu-Mollweide, van der Grinten, van der Grinten IV, Wagner IV, Wagner VII, Winkel Tripel.

2

I'm using a second answer only because this is a different approach to the same problem. Again, this answer is an alternative approach that tries to avoid a point in polygon solution that uses an svg outline of the projection extent.

This alternative should (I've only tried a handful) work for any projection while my other answer works only for projections projected to a disc. Secondly, this approach doesn't attempt to define the projection area to determine if a pixel should be rendered, but uses d3.projection itself.


As multiple points can return the same value with projection.invert, we can run a forward projection to verify if a pixel should be drawn.

If projection(projection.invert(point)) == point then the point is within the bounds of our projection.

Granted, there may be some precision/rounding errors in this, so some degree of tolerance could be specified.

This check fits within the for loop:

for (var y = 0, i = -1; y < height; ++y) {
    for (var x = 0; x < width; ++x) {

        var p = projection.invert([x, y]), λ = p[0], φ = p[1];

        var pxy = projection(p);

        var tolerance = 0.5;
        if ( λ > 180 || λ < -180 || φ > 90 || φ < -90 ) { i += 4; continue; }
        if ( (Math.abs(pxy[0] - x) < tolerance ) && (Math.abs(pxy[1] - y) < tolerance ) ) {

            var q = ((90 - φ) / 180 * dy | 0) * dx + ((180 + λ) / 360 * dx | 0) << 2;
            targetData[++i] = sourceData[q];
            targetData[++i] = sourceData[++q];
            targetData[++i] = sourceData[++q];
            targetData[++i] = 255;

        }
        else {
            i += 4;
        } 
    }
}

As with the other answer, I built a block out of it here.

I haven't checked this answer for performance, and it seems odd that this sort of check is needed, but it might be a suitable alternative approach to the svg approach proposed in your question.

  • This solution works, although it is indeed not a very good performance to check that the function did what it was supposed to do. I think that this check should be done inside the projection.invert function, only for the projections that currently have glitches (for the others it is unnecessary and a waste of computations). In summary, I think it is more a bug on the inverse functions than a feature to deal with. For the moment this works fine to me, thanks. – Daniel Ramos Jan 25 '17 at 17:30
  • By the way, you still need the line if ( λ > 180 || λ < -180 || φ > 90 || φ < -90 ) { i += 4; continue; }, since the forward projection also accepts points outside the range [-180,180]x[-90,90] (which probably shouldn't). Check for instance Laskowski projection. – Daniel Ramos Jan 25 '17 at 17:34
  • Ah, I was wondering if that if statement would come into play. In my few tests it didn't appear to so I thought I'd try to optimize. I'll put it back into the code block, thanks for the catch there. And again, agreed that projection.invert should do this check without a workaround. – Andrew Reid Jan 25 '17 at 17:40
2

While I'm pretty sure you are using the projection.inverse function correctly, relying on :

if (λ > 180 || λ < -180 || φ > 90 || φ < -90) { i += 4; continue; }

to clip the projection will always fail as projection.inverse appears to always return angles within 180 degrees east/west. While there may be a way to modify the projection itself to return values greater than 180 degrees, it is likely more difficult than other approaches (And honestly, that goes well beyond any answer I can give).

Likewise, using an SVG path to represent the world outline and then using that as the basis to determine if a point should be drawn is probably complicating the matter.

Instead, assuming a circular disc, you can easily compute the radius of the disc and from there determine if a pixel should be drawn:

var edge = {};
var center = {};

edge.x = projection([180 - 1e-6, 0])[0];
edge.y = projection([180 - 1e-6, 0])[1];

center.x = width/2;
center.y = height/2;

var radius = Math.pow( Math.pow(center.x - edge.x,2) + Math.pow(center.y - edge.y,2) , 0.5 )

Using the radius of the disc, we can then compute if a pixel falls on the disc or beyond it in the for loop:

for (var y = 0, i = -1; y < height; ++y) {
    for (var x = 0; x < width; ++x) {

    var p = projection.invert([x, y]), λ = p[0], φ = p[1];

        if (Math.pow( Math.pow(center.x-x,2) + Math.pow(center.y-y,2), 0.5) < radius) {

            if ( λ > 180 || λ < -180 || φ > 90 || φ < -90 ) { i += 4; continue; }
                var q = ((90 - φ) / 180 * dy | 0) * dx + ((180 + λ) / 360 * dx | 0) << 2;
                targetData[++i] = sourceData[q];
                targetData[++i] = sourceData[++q];
                targetData[++i] = sourceData[++q];
                targetData[++i] = 255;
        }
        else {
            targetData[++i] = 0;
            targetData[++i] = 0;
            targetData[++i] = 0;
            targetData[++i] = 0;
        }
    }
}

Together, these gave me:

enter image description here

For aesthetic effect, it might be worthwhile trimming the radius down by a certain percent. Of course for different projections this approach may be either difficult or impossible.

I've put the code into a bl.ock here (I moved it to d3 v4 in the process, partly to see if the behavior of projection.inverse is the same).

For the third part of your question, you could try d3's graticule (graticule.outline) function for some info on how d3 gets the boundary profile of a projection.

  • Your solution is certainly the appropriate check for this projection, but I am looking for something that applies to all projections on d3.geo. Indeed, this condition for a point to be on the circle should be on the code of the inverse projection, otherwise it is not truly a mathematical inverse (the mapping should be bijective). – Daniel Ramos Jan 25 '17 at 10:35
  • Yeah, agree, it seems like it should use a check such as this in projection.invert. I might have an alternative and easier (though perhaps not computationally) approach that should work for any given projection, adding it as a separate answer as it is a fairly different approach. – Andrew Reid Jan 25 '17 at 16:37

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