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I'm trying to run tests using the Mocha.js + JSDOM frameworks, but I'm having trouble getting Mocha to start up. This is in the process of testing a React app using the Vue.js library. I keep getting the following error:

var req = require.context('./', false, /\.vue$/);
TypeError: require.context is not a function

The code in question is:

let req = require.context('./', false, /\.vue$/);
components.forEach(function (component) {
    try {
        let filePath = './' + component + '.vue';
        let injected = inject(req(filePath));
        Vue.component(getComponentName(component), injected);

        let appComponent = {
            name: injected.name,
            props: {
                autocompletion: {
                    metadata: getComponentName('template'),
                    score: xTemplatesScore,
                    attributes: injected.props || []
                }
            }
        };

        appComponents.push(appComponent);

    } catch (err) {
        console.log(err);
        console.error('Vue file was not found for component:' + component + '. Please rename your files accordingly ( component-name.vue )');
    }

Is there a way to get around this and actually get Mocha to start up? Or is there a suitable replacement for require.context? I've tried to redo it with just plain string concatenations and a vanilla require, but that keeps telling me that none of the Vue modules can be found.

1 Answer 1

5

require.context is a method of webpack. Your tests must be bundled before they can be run.

Normally, you'd create a separate webpack config file for your tests. You'll then create a test bundle using webpack and then run Mocha on this bundle. Alternatively, you can use mocha-loader inside the webpack test config file and let the tests run as part of the bundling process.

Further information can be found in the webpack documentation on testing.

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