310

How can I sort this list in descending order?

timestamp = [
    "2010-04-20 10:07:30",
    "2010-04-20 10:07:38",
    "2010-04-20 10:07:52",
    "2010-04-20 10:08:22",
    "2010-04-20 10:08:22",
    "2010-04-20 10:09:46",
    "2010-04-20 10:10:37",
    "2010-04-20 10:10:58",
    "2010-04-20 10:11:50",
    "2010-04-20 10:12:13",
    "2010-04-20 10:12:13",
    "2010-04-20 10:25:38"
]
361

In one line, using a lambda:

timestamp.sort(key=lambda x: time.strptime(x, '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S')[0:6], reverse=True)

Passing a function to list.sort:

def foo(x):
    return time.strptime(x, '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S')[0:6]

timestamp.sort(key=foo, reverse=True)
  • 13
    The conversion to a time tuple is unnecessary. – Marcelo Cantos Nov 15 '10 at 10:48
  • 2
    @Marcelo: Only by coincidence. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 15 '10 at 10:50
  • 15
    @IgnacioVazquez-Abrams no, not by coincidence. ISO 8601 is expressly designed so that alphabetical order coincides with chronological order. – jwg Oct 8 '15 at 8:32
  • @jwg Agree with the sentiment (it's clearly by design, not coincidence), but the given format doesn't conform to ISO 8601. – Marcelo Cantos Dec 20 '15 at 8:10
  • 2
    @jwg there's a space between the date and time components. – Marcelo Cantos Dec 29 '15 at 2:16
362

This will give you a sorted version of the array.

sorted(timestamp, reverse=True)

If you want to sort in-place:

timestamp.sort(reverse=True)
  • 2
    reverse was added in 2.4. But note that sort() is stable, so the two bits of code given won't necessarily give the same result. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 15 '10 at 10:49
  • 3
    @Rajeev - don't forget you can sort dates only if they are written in this way (YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS), where alphabetically is the same like chronologically. 'DD.MM.YYYY' would be a good example, where you would need more than just sort(reverse=True). – eumiro Nov 15 '10 at 11:28
  • print("List before sort"); print(myList); myList.sort(reverse = True); print("sortedList : " + str(myList)); – Erum Apr 11 '17 at 9:26
  • @Erum that's an answer, not a comment, and as an answer, it's redundant. – Marcelo Cantos Apr 11 '17 at 9:30
52

You can simply do this:

timestamp.sort(reverse=True)
8

Since your list is already in ascending order, we can simply reverse the list.

>>> timestamp.reverse()
>>> timestamp
['2010-04-20 10:25:38', 
'2010-04-20 10:12:13', 
'2010-04-20 10:12:13', 
'2010-04-20 10:11:50', 
'2010-04-20 10:10:58', 
'2010-04-20 10:10:37', 
'2010-04-20 10:09:46', 
'2010-04-20 10:08:22',
'2010-04-20 10:08:22', 
'2010-04-20 10:07:52', 
'2010-04-20 10:07:38', 
'2010-04-20 10:07:30']
5

you simple type:

timestamp.sort()
timestamp=timestamp[::-1]
  • This is a strange answer because you do the sorting in-place but then the reversing out-of-place. If there is another variable aliasing the original list, its value afterwards will not have the elements in their original order, nor in descending order; the alias will point at a list sorted in ascending order. That could be rather surprising, and a source of subtle bugs. – kaya3 Nov 10 at 16:44

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