10

I know it was asked here many times and many times answered this is not a way how it should be done, but once more again :)

Is it possible, somehow, to call async function (such as timer / ajax call), basically common async task and synchronously wait until it ends without having 100%CPU usage and blocked browser?

Simple answer is enough - yes or no. If no i have to write all code depending on the async operation in "async way" Otherwise, it would be better ;)

imagine something like:

updateCSS("someurl.css")

function updateCSS(url) {

   var css = getCachedResource(url);

   css = css.replace(/regexp/gm, function(curUrl) {
     base64 = atob(getCachedResource(curUrl))
     return "data:image;base64," + base64
   })

}

function getCachedResource(url) {
  
  //...
  
  if (cached) {
    
    return cached
    
  } else {
    
    // doajax...    
    // watfor
    
    return loaded
  }
  
}

Of course, I can make it async, but the code will be.... terrible. Moreover, I have to make async all functions calling this function. Can you see simple solution? Blocking would be simplest I would say.

Thanks

17
  • 5
    The answer is no. Welcome to programming in JavaScript :)
    – Pointy
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 1:54
  • 1
    there is absolutely nothing that can turn asynchronous to synchronous. If you stop and think about it, it's obvious why. the code will be.... terrible - embrace asynchronicity and the code can be beautiful again Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 1:56
  • Yup. Sad :) I'll never understand why they didn't implement wait for async op.
    – Fis
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 1:57
  • Jaro: it will be terrible as I have to: a) check all possible changes, b) load resources and while it will be done c) replace. Nice 3 lines to 40 others... Or of course, replacing while loading, bla bla bla, a lot of complicated stuff.
    – Fis
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 1:59
  • 1
    @Pointy - I think it's dangerous to make people think that async/await are pausing execution and waiting because they aren't. They are syntactic sugar which tells the interpreter to implicitly wrap the code that follows in an automatic .then() handler. Other JS can still run in response to other events just like today. They do make the code prettier, but don't change what you can/can't do at all. I'm worried that async/await will lead to more and more people not understanding how asynchronous code really works.
    – jfriend00
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 2:56

7 Answers 7

3

So just to summarize....

The answer is NO. It will never be possible to block the function or any other code and wait until the async operation is done. There is no mechanism for it supported directly by the JavaScript VM.

Especially in browser environment where it is not possible to manipulate the JavaScript virtual machine event loop (as it is possible with Node and how actually "deasync" library is doing it).

It is because of the JavaScript concurrency model and event processing as mentioned here:

https://developer.mozilla.org/cs/docs/Web/JavaScript/EventLoop

It has nothing to do with the fact the JavaScript is single threaded.

Also, please note, all stuff like Promises and new features like await/async are just a different way, how to write/manage the code for asynchronous tasks. It is not and never will be helpful in turning the async to sync.

So don't spend time, like me, by trying to find a way how to do it. Rather spend it by designing the async code ;)

0

As others have pointed out, the short answer is no: Javascript is single-threaded in most environments in which it's used. What you what to have happen is to do your processing of the CSS in another callback from getCachedResource()

Something like this:

function updateCSS(url) {
    getCachedResource(url, function(css) {
        // process the css
    });
}

function getCachedResource(url, done) {
    //...
    if (cached) {
        cachedCSS = ...
        done(cachedCSS);
    } else {
        $.ajax(
        {
            // ...
            success: function(result) {
                // Get the css from the response
                done(css);
            }
            // ...
        });
    }
}

Take a look at jQuery "deferred" objects or Javascript promises for a more complete way of dealing with callbacks

4
  • Unfortunately, its not only about single threading but more about the concurency model and event loop javascript vm internally does. As I posted above, I had to read this first: developer.mozilla.org/cs/docs/Web/JavaScript/EventLoop then it would be clear to me that what is async can't never be done sync. And it does not matter which pattern or syntactic sugar i'll use... Callbacks, promises, async, await... Nothing will prevent function from returning, everything is simply... async and internally works in the same way. Call async ->event done->check error->call done or error code.
    – Fis
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 10:31
  • Btw. If you took a look to my cote the main issue is not in accessing of the first resource, but image resources in the following replacer "loop" which must be written in completely different way async than in the example I gave you. It will be something like get css -> asyncdone -> get all urls from css to array -> get all arrayed resources (cache/server ajax) -> asyncresourcedone -> replace(url, atob(resource)) -> alldone? yes, donecallback or, by promise nesting but the real code graph will be almost the same.
    – Fis
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 10:38
  • It's a paradigm shift: Javascript in an async environment doesn't really work by returning values from function. It works by passing values onto the next function. In your example you just need to repeat the pattern in the inner section. Call a routine to get the information and pass it a new function to process the result. Remember also that Javascript functions have access to the local variables of the enclosing functions Commented Jan 28, 2017 at 0:08
  • async/await/promises solved my problem after solving another one with 3rd party libs. Didn't want to believe it will be that nice (except the generated ECMA5.)
    – Fis
    Commented Jan 29, 2017 at 0:00
0

Yes.

You want your code to "sleep" until an "async function (such as timer / ajax call) ... ends without having 100%CPU usage". This is exactly what async/await does.

Other answers and comments are fixating on your phrase "synchronously wait", which in JS means blocking, but I understand you to just want to avoid having to refactor your code "the async way". You want to write straightforwardly, without structuring everything as numerous callbacks.

To use async/await, you first have to embrace promises - the space/time of async JavaScript. You then need a modern browser like Chrome or Firefox Developer Edition, or transpile your code with Babel js.

Next, you want to look at fetch, the promise-returning modern way to do ajax.

Now you have everything you need. Here's an example that works in the aforementioned browsers:

async function fetchy(...args) {
  let response = await fetch(...args);
  if (!response.ok) throw new Error((await response.json()).error_message);
  return response;
}

async function showUser(user) {
  let url = `https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/users/${user}?site=stackoverflow`;
  let item = (await (await fetchy(url)).json()).items[0];
  console.log(JSON.stringify(item, null, 2));

  let blob = await (await fetchy(item.profile_image)).blob();
  img.src = URL.createObjectURL(blob);
}

input.oninput = async e => await showUser(e.target.value);
showUser(input.value);
<input id="input" type="number" value="918910"></input><br>
<img id="img"></img>
<pre id="pre"></pre>

FYI, fetchy is my helper for sane fetch error handling.

14
  • 1
    I think you really should start your answer with "No, but" instead of "Yes". The await keyword lets your code sleep/wait indeed, but not synchronously.
    – Bergi
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 5:04
  • @Bergi I hope my answer clarifies what yes means. The question doesn't know what it's asking, using both "sleep" and "sync wait" in the same sentence (an oxymoron in JS). Thus we have to guess what's desired. My guess is users with this question pine for synchronous-looking code that's not "terrible".
    – jib
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 5:23
  • You really need to fix your answer. The OP explicitly asks for "synchronously wait". That is NOT what async/await does. It does not turn async code into synchronous code. Other event handlers will run. Concurrency issues can exist if you think nothing else is running while waiting for the async result. async/await is just syntactical sugar. It does not change how the code works. It just makes it more pleasant to write the syntax for async code.
    – jfriend00
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 8:25
  • And, answers that lead people (particularly newbies who don't want to learn how to property write async-aware code) to believe it magically solves all async programming issues are dangerous and will just lead to trouble for those who believe them and even more trouble when they start writing code. async/await will be a nice tool for those who understand what it does and how it works. It does not allow you to magically write async code without any understanding of what is really going on the async world.
    – jfriend00
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 8:27
  • Await will never wait. Internally, its another "callback" function called when something is asynchronously done. It does not block or wait at all.
    – Fis
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 10:45
0

Simply, The Answer is NO.

Don't think in this way. think about backend performance rather than doing in client side.

2
  • Can't be done on server in my case. Backend is dumb "file" server without computing power and scripting / coding possibilities.
    – Fis
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 11:10
  • And by the way, saving the bandwidth by reusing the same image through mutliple stylesheets... backend can't help Moreover, I don't like devs who says: move everything to backend, we can scale there... and write code like pigs. I am quiet old school guy from times when every memory saved byte helped a lot and every transferred byte costed a lot of money. Fortunately, we are in different times but it does not mean we should not optimize effectively and just say, lets scale. Especially when clients are going to be powerful enough to do some tasks there (of course, not a security stuff).
    – Fis
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 11:21
0

No, you can't do that even with 100% cpu usage or a blocked browser. Things have been precisely engineered to prevent you from doing that.

This makes all asynchronous code is poisonous, meaning all code that calls async functions (either promise or callback based) must be asynchronous itself.

About the terrible code: Promise chains and async/await for the rescue, they help you to write asynchronous code with much better syntax. Don't be afraid, use async/await especially if you already use a transpiler.

1
  • 1
    It does not mean the promise or sync/async will make it nicer than sync :D Many other tasks must be done in async compared to sync.
    – Fis
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 11:45
0

Is it possible, somehow, to call async function (such as timer / ajax call), basically common async task and synchronously wait until it ends without having 100%CPU usage and blocked browser?

No. You can't "synchronously wait" for an async result in Javascript. Because of it's single threaded and event-driven design, it just won't work that way.

As the majority of the other talk/comments about this question have been conceptual in nature, I thought I'd offer an answer about how you would practically solve your specific problem using an appropriate asynchronous design.

Javascript does not offer the ability to sleep while some time consuming activity finishes. So, you cannot design your updateCSS() function to have a purely synchronous interface. Instead, you will need to use asynchronous tools in Javascript to design an interface that would work for both the case where the resource is cached and when the resource must be fetched over the network.

The usual way to design for that is to design an async interface and, if the resource happens to be cached, you still serve it through the async interface. Then, you have one interface that the caller can use and that interface always works whether the resource is cached or not. It requires the caller to use an async interface.

Practically, you can design like this getCachedResource():

function getCachedResource(url) {
  //...
  if (cached) {
    // returns a promise who's resolved value is the resource
    return Promise.resolve(cached);
  } else {
    // returns a promise who's resolved value is the resource
    return doAjax(...);
  }
}

Here getCachedResource() always returns a promise, whether the value is cached or not. So, the caller always uses the promise interface like this:

getCachedResource(...).then(function(result) {
    // use the result here
});

If the result happens to be cached, the .then() handler will be called immediately (on the next tick). If the result is retrieved over the network, the .then() handler will be called as soon as the result is available. The caller doesn't need to worry about where or how the resource was retrieved - they have the one interface for getting it.

In the updateCSS() function, you're going to have to design for using the asynchronous interface in getCachedResource(). Because your current design uses a synchronous callback in css.replace(), you'll have to rethink that a bit to fit the async retrieval into there. Here's one approach for how to do that.

function updateCSS(url) {
   return getCachedResource(url).then(function(css) {
       // preflight the replacements we need to do so we know what to fetch
       var urls = [];
       css.replace(/regexp/gm, function(curUrl) {
           urls.push(curUrl);
       });
       // now load all the resources
       return Promise.all(urls.map(getCachedResource)).then(function(resources) {
           // now have all the resources, in proper order
           var index = 0;
           css = css.replace(/regexp/gm, function(curUrl) {
               return resources[index++];
           });
           // final resolved value is the fully loaded css
           return css;
       })
   });
}

The scheme here is to run a dummy .replace() that does not keep the result to generate the list of urls you need to load. Depending upon your regex, this could also be done with .match() or .exec(). Then, once you have the list of URLs to fetch, go get them all. When you have all of them, then you can run the .replace() for real because you have the resources available to use in the synchronous .replace() callback.

One could then use this like this:

updateCss(someCSSURL).then(function(css) {
    // use the CSS here
}).catch(function(err) {
    // process error here
});
10
  • Thanks for a lot of work you did! Hopefully it will be great example for others. I'll do it in bit different way as I can't (don't want) to use promises :)
    – Fis
    Commented Jan 26, 2017 at 13:47
  • @Fis - Why not use promises? They are the modern way to manage async operations.
    – jfriend00
    Commented Jan 26, 2017 at 14:34
  • Because polyfills and everything related to them (all the tool chain necessary to build the complete app such as gulp, webpack and others) are forbidden in my project at this time :)
    – Fis
    Commented Jan 27, 2017 at 16:06
  • btw, fortunately we are not pushed to use everything "modern" right? :)
    – Fis
    Commented Jan 27, 2017 at 16:08
  • @Fis - Of course not, but modern things are invented for a reason because they solve problems and make life easier. They are often "advances" in how we do things. I don't know why simply using promises has to drag in gulp and webpack. Yes, if you intend to support old browsers, you would need a polyfill (I would suggest bluebird), but that is one script tag from a CDN, not everything you're talking about. I could write the above code without promises, but it would take 5x as long and a lot more code and I'd be rewriting logic already solved by promises.
    – jfriend00
    Commented Jan 27, 2017 at 17:11
0

I like all the other answers, and I understand why you cannot make an async task synchronous. I got brought here trying to figure out how to await for the FileReader object to finish reading so I can read multiple files with the same FileReader object.

Issues with personal problem that I overcame: The FileReader object does not return a promise, therefore you cannot await.

I made a recursive function that would run in a loop to do the first read, and check when the .loadend event hit, then move on to the next file. For those critics out there, yes this is likely bad practice, but it works.

To return to your problem, the ajax request is asynchronous and like my example, it does not return a promise and therefore you can't use an await. After digging a bit, I found a stackoverflow post that likely could solve both of our problems in a practical way:

How to await the ajax request?

You can make a function that will take the url and return the ajax call. This can be awaited and therefore you can use a .then(doSomethingAfter()) and all the cool stuff promises can do. I'll let you know how it works for the FileReader after I try it.

~~~~EDIT~~~~

here's my code:

function getFileResolve(reader, files, currentNum) {
    try {
        var file = files[currentNum];
        return reader.readAsText(file)
    } catch(err) {
        console.log(err)
    }
};

function main() {
    $('#imported-files').on('change', function() {
        var files = this.files,
            reader = new FileReader(),
            currentFileNum = 0;

        reader.onload = function(e) {
            console.log(e.target.result);
            currentFileNum++;

            getFileResolve(reader, files, currentFileNum);
        }
        
        getFileResolve(reader, files, currentFileNum);
    })
};

$(document).ready(main);

The ajax call can be returned and from there can be treated as a promise. The FileReader object has a onloaded event, as mentioned before and therefore can just call the next file for you and it is recursive on it's own. Hopefully this helps anyone out there. #promises_are_hard

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