2

I am studying C from The C Programming Language. I have tried to make the following code work:

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    int char_count = 0;
    while (getchar() != EOF)
        ++char_count;
    printf("Number of chars are %ld ", char_count);
    return 0;
}

I build and run the code. Then, I enter a random word and press enter. I expect to see a number in the next line, but what happens is that cursor moves to the next line. When I enter a new word same thing happens. What am I missing?

Edit: I expect getchar() to return EOF when the program finishes getting the characters of the first word.

2
  • 2
    when are you expecting getchar to return EOF?
    – bruceg
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 2:36
  • 1
    Carriage return/newline is not EOF. Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 2:51

3 Answers 3

5

When you are pressing enter/return you are generating \n or \r\n based on the whether you are using unix/osx or windows. You are not generation EOF character.

To generate EOF character you need to press ^D on unix/osx or ^Z on windows.

1
  • Thanks for the comment, but it seems that you accepted other answer
    – Sarvex
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 3:03
0

Inputting the EOF character into the command prompt is always tricky. Doing what @Sarvex recommended will do the trick, by using Ctrl+Z on Windows or Ctrl+D on Unix.

One other interesting thing that you can do without making any changes to your code is instead of having your program accept input from the command prompt, you can redirect input to your program from a text file.

If you had a text file named, "data.txt" with the following text in it:

Hello World. How are you doing?

And the name of your program, after compiling the code was charCount. You could do the following:

enter image description here

The output I received was, Number of chars are 31.

1
  • Thanks for your answer, I did not know how to read from a text file with command prompt. Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 22:37
-2

If you change the EOF to \n character, it will do the work after pressing the enter key:

int c = 0;
while (((c = getchar()) != '\n') && (c != EOF))
    ++char_count;

P.S: Improved Using @David Bowling suggestion.

6
  • The change should be to add a test for '\n' instead of just replacing EOF with '\n': int c; while ((c = getchar()) != '\n' && c != EOF) {}. Note that getchar() returns EOF if there is an error; you want to avoid an infinite loop. Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 2:48
  • This new code also will not count the number of characters in a file. Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 2:53
  • @David Bowling, Thanks, I improved the code using your suggestion.
    – hmofrad
    Commented Jan 25, 2017 at 3:03
  • I am not sure how this answers the original question. I expect getchar() to return EOF when the program finishes getting the characters of the first word. Commented Feb 6, 2017 at 10:45
  • @apeirogon, If you read the original question more carefully, you may see this: "I expect to see a number in the next line, but what happens is that cursor moves to the next line." This means the getchar() is terminated after hitting the enter which is the \n character and not EOF, because we're reading from terminal and not a file.
    – hmofrad
    Commented Feb 6, 2017 at 16:05

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.