1

In FASM there are 2 ways to define a structure:

struc point x, y, z
{
    .x db x,
    .y db y,
    .z db z
}

and

struct POINT
    x db ?
    y db ?
    z db ?
ends 

When should I use which?

2
  • 2
    If you would like some MASM compatibility, the second version would be preferable. – zx485 Jan 25 '17 at 9:11
  • @zx485, why? and if not? – Torito Jan 27 '17 at 4:34
1

The short answer:

Use struct/ends.

Explanation:

These two constructions are similar, but still have essential differences.

struc directive:

The first uses struc directive. It is very similar to macro directive and simply creates a template of the structure. But until you create an "instance" of this template, it does not exists actually. The following example will be compiled with error:

 struc POINT {
   .x dd ?
   .y dd ?
 }

mov eax, [esi+POINT.x]

On the other hand, the following code will compile properly:

struc POINT {
  .x dd ?
  .y dd ?
}
myPoint POINT

mov eax, [myPoint.x]

But this will not:

lea esi, [myPoint]
mov eax, [esi+POINT.x]

The POINT in the above example is simply a template, but not structure with defined offsets, sizes, etc.

struct/ends macros:

The macros struct/ends are created in order to fix the above disadvantages of the struc directive. Besides creating the template, they create as well an instance of this template at address 0 and a label in the sizeof. address space, containing the size of the structure.

The struct definition below...

struct POINT
  .x dd ?
  .y dd ?
ends

...is (approximately) equal to the following raw definitions:

struc POINT {
  .x dd ?
  .y dd ?
}

virtual at 0
  POINT POINT
  sizeof.POINT = $ - POINT
end virtual

That is why we have both - a template and real offset labels. Using struct all above example code will compile properly:

struct POINT
  .x dd ?
  .y dd ?
ends

myPoint1 POINT
myPoint2 POINT

lea esi, [myPoint1]

mov eax, [esi+POINT.x]
mov [myPoint2.x], eax
mov ecx, sizeof.POINT

Notice that the above "equial" code is just for illustration. The real implementations of struct macro can differs. For example FreshLib library uses the above approach, while the FASM macro library uses another in order to avoid dots in the field names and to implement more features, like fields initialization, etc.

But the end result is more or less equal plus/minus small details.

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