721

I know the POSIX sleep(x) function makes the program sleep for x seconds. Is there a function to make the program sleep for x milliseconds in C++?

4
  • 7
    You should be aware that, in Windows anyway, Sleep() has millisecond precision, but it's accuracy can be orders of magnitude higher. You may think your sleeping for 4 milliseconds, but actually sleep for 400. Nov 15 '10 at 13:09
  • 5
    @John Dibling: I think he's using POSIX sleep, not win32 Sleep given "x seconds".
    – CB Bailey
    Nov 15 '10 at 13:14
  • 1
    Although C and C++ have different name mangling, which can be a source of bugs and incompatibilities, in most cases it's fine to use C headers in C++. However, if you want to be absolutely sure that nothing goes wrong, #include the C header inside an extern "C" {} block. Also, if you have C and C++ source files in the same project, it's highly recommended that you do this in order to avoid any problems, especially if you include the same headers in both kinds of source files (in which case this is necessary). If you have a purely C++ project, it might just work with no problem at all.
    – notadam
    Mar 17 '15 at 12:56
  • 3
    @JohnDibling no, not 400ms. The worst precision you might ever have gotten was from Windows 9x, whose GetTickCount had 55ms resolution; later versions had 16ms resolution or less. One user thought he was getting 16ms resolution from Sleep but then reported that Sleep itself was fairly accurate, and the apparent imprecision was caused by using GetTickCount to measure the passage of time.
    – Qwertie
    Jan 10 '19 at 21:20

19 Answers 19

1461

In C++11, you can do this with standard library facilities:

#include <chrono>
#include <thread>
std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(x));

Clear and readable, no more need to guess at what units the sleep() function takes.

20
  • 6
    Does std::this_thread::sleep_for define an interruption point? Like boost::this_thread_sleep does? Jul 18 '13 at 9:28
  • 84
    This is the right way to do it. Period. Thread is cross platform as well as chrono.
    – Void
    Nov 19 '13 at 18:36
  • 104
    @Void. A very good way certainly, but "the" and "period" are awfully strong words. Jan 4 '15 at 7:12
  • 7
    Is it a busy sleep? I need to yield to another thread during sleep; can I use sleep_for for that?
    – Michael
    Oct 8 '15 at 18:31
  • 18
    @Michael: It's not a busy sleep, it will yield to other threads. Oct 9 '15 at 2:32
500

Note that there is no standard C API for milliseconds, so (on Unix) you will have to settle for usleep, which accepts microseconds:

#include <unistd.h>

unsigned int microseconds;
...
usleep(microseconds);
4
  • 2
    Is it a busy sleep? I need to yield to another thread during sleep; can I use usleep for that?
    – Michael
    Oct 8 '15 at 18:30
  • 15
    It's not a busy wait stackoverflow.com/a/8156644/1206499, and nanosleepmay be a better choice since usleep is obsolete.
    – jswetzen
    Dec 3 '15 at 14:55
  • 4
    Niet, please consider mentioning @HighCommander4's answer which is more portable if you have a C++11 compiler.
    – einpoklum
    Nov 14 '16 at 15:54
  • 9
    usleep() deprecated in POSIX in 2001 and removed in 2008. Jun 6 '18 at 8:09
84

To stay portable you could use Boost::Thread for sleeping:

#include <boost/thread/thread.hpp>

int main()
{
    //waits 2 seconds
    boost::this_thread::sleep( boost::posix_time::seconds(1) );
    boost::this_thread::sleep( boost::posix_time::milliseconds(1000) );

    return 0;
}

This answer is a duplicate and has been posted in this question before. Perhaps you could find some usable answers there too.

1
40

In Unix you can use usleep.

In Windows there is Sleep.

3
  • 6
    and the Windows call is in milliseconds.
    – shindigo
    Sep 13 '13 at 14:06
  • 18
    You have to include <unistd.h> or <Windows.h> respectively.
    – gbmhunter
    May 7 '14 at 5:13
  • Yes, but couldn't the actual time resolution be 15-16 ms (even if the unit in the call is 1 ms) and thus the minimum time be 15-16 ms? Oct 6 '17 at 17:38
33

Depending on your platform you may have usleep or nanosleep available. usleep is deprecated and has been deleted from the most recent POSIX standard; nanosleep is preferred.

1
  • 6
    Note that while usleep() is declared in <unistd.h>, confusingly, nanosleep() is declared in <time.h>/<ctime>.
    – gbmhunter
    May 7 '14 at 5:14
26

Why don't use time.h library? Runs on Windows and POSIX systems(Don't use this code in production!):

#include <iostream>
#include <time.h>

using namespace std;

void sleepcp(int milliseconds);

void sleepcp(int milliseconds) // Cross-platform sleep function
{
    clock_t time_end;
    time_end = clock() + milliseconds * CLOCKS_PER_SEC/1000;
    while (clock() < time_end)
    {
    }
}
int main()
{
    cout << "Hi! At the count to 3, I'll die! :)" << endl;
    sleepcp(3000);
    cout << "urrrrggghhhh!" << endl;
}

Corrected code - now CPU stays in IDLE state [2014.05.24]:

#include <iostream>
#ifdef _WIN32
    #include <windows.h>
#else
    #include <unistd.h>
#endif // _WIN32

using namespace std;

void sleepcp(int milliseconds);

void sleepcp(int milliseconds) // Cross-platform sleep function
{
    #ifdef _WIN32
        Sleep(milliseconds);
    #else
        usleep(milliseconds * 1000);
    #endif // _WIN32
}
int main()
{
    cout << "Hi! At the count to 3, I'll die! :)" << endl;
    sleepcp(3000);
    cout << "urrrrggghhhh!" << endl;
}
5
  • 30
    One of the problems with that code is that it is a busy loop, it will continue using the 100% of a single processor core. The sleep function is implemented around an OS call that will put to sleep the current thread and do something else, and only will wake up the thread when the specified time expires.
    – Ismael
    May 20 '14 at 22:53
  • You're right - it will consume 100% of a one CPU core. So here is rewritten code using system sleep functions - and it's still cross-platform: May 23 '14 at 22:25
  • @BartGrzybicki i know this is an old answer and all, but in Visual Studio 2017 on a windows machine, #ifdef WIN32 doesn't evaluate as true by-default. Jun 20 '18 at 3:02
  • 2
    @kayleeFrye_onDeck Code is wrong. It should be #ifdef _WIN32.
    – Contango
    Aug 22 '19 at 20:59
  • 1
    @Contango I knew that! But not when I wrote that... lol. Thanks for the follow-up! Aug 22 '19 at 21:01
18

nanosleep is a better choice than usleep - it is more resilient against interrupts.

1
  • 6
    I was familiar with usleep, but not nanosleep. You should provide an example of using it on Linux.
    – jww
    Aug 14 '16 at 3:10
17
#include <windows.h>

Syntax:

Sleep (  __in DWORD dwMilliseconds   );

Usage:

Sleep (1000); //Sleeps for 1000 ms or 1 sec
4
  • 4
    What do you need to include for this? Jun 25 '14 at 4:21
  • #include <WinBase.h>
    – foobar
    Jun 25 '14 at 5:40
  • 9
    No, you need to #include <windows.h> Jun 26 '14 at 2:39
  • 9
    The question strongly implies that a POSIX solution is required. Jul 14 '17 at 9:10
15
#include <chrono>
#include <thread>

std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(1000)); // sleep for 1 second

Remember to import the two headers.

1
10

From C++14 using std and also its numeric literals:

#include <chrono>
#include <thread>

using namespace std::chrono;

std::this_thread::sleep_for(123ms);
3
  • How is this implemented? 123ms looks weird.
    – vy32
    May 24 at 0:56
  • In short, it is implemented as user-defined literal, similarly as you define other operators: long double operator "" ms(long double) In my opinion is is better readable than chrono::milliseconds(1000). See [User-defined literals][1] for more info. [1]: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/user_literal May 26 at 11:22
  • Woah. That is crazy.
    – vy32
    May 26 at 11:27
7

If using MS Visual C++ 10.0, you can do this with standard library facilities:

Concurrency::wait(milliseconds);

you will need:

#include <concrt.h>
2
  • 12
    Don't use the word "standard" when you don't actually mean it. <concrt.h> is not a Standard Library header - it may be a platform library; in which case you should state the prerequisites clearly. Jul 14 '17 at 9:09
  • Not only that, but we'd expect a linux question to be using one of the popular compilers. Jan 15 at 12:52
6

On platforms with the select function (POSIX, Linux, and Windows) you could do:

void sleep(unsigned long msec) {
    timeval delay = {msec / 1000, msec % 1000 * 1000};
    int rc = ::select(0, NULL, NULL, NULL, &delay);
    if(-1 == rc) {
        // Handle signals by continuing to sleep or return immediately.
    }
}

However, there are better alternatives available nowadays.

4
  • Can't seem to compile in VS2017 on a Windows machine: error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol _select@20 referenced in function "void __cdecl sleep(unsigned long)" (?sleep@@YAXK@Z) Jun 20 '18 at 3:07
  • @kayleeFrye_onDeck It does compile. Just doesn't link. Lookup you Windows docs. Jun 20 '18 at 9:10
  • what header do you use for timeval ?? Jun 9 '20 at 1:48
  • @TotteKarlsson <sys/time.h>. Jun 9 '20 at 8:52
4

The way to sleep your program in C++ is the Sleep(int) method. The header file for it is #include "windows.h."

For example:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "windows.h"
#include "iostream"
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int x = 6000;
    Sleep(x);
    cout << "6 seconds have passed" << endl;
    return 0;
}

The time it sleeps is measured in milliseconds and has no limit.

Second = 1000 milliseconds
Minute = 60000 milliseconds
Hour = 3600000 milliseconds
4
  • 3
    What do you mean it has no limit? It surely has limit which is 0xFFFFFFFE. Waiting for 0xFFFFFFFF will just not time out (which means it will wait till program ends).
    – Izzy
    Jan 16 '15 at 9:31
  • I didn't mean it like that Izzy, sorry for our misunderstanding. I meant that you can enter any positive number of milliseconds. So it will wait that many milliseconds to close the program. If you do not understand please say so, I shall explain to you more.
    – Phi
    Jan 18 '15 at 16:54
  • Yes, but what it the actual time resolution? Couldn't it be 15-16 ms in some cases? E.g., if you use Sleep(3) will it actually sleep for 3 ms or will it instead be 15-16 ms? Oct 6 '17 at 17:46
  • I don't think "windows.h" is a standard POSIX or Linux header... Jan 15 at 12:50
3

Select call is a way of having more precision (sleep time can be specified in nanoseconds).

1
  • While this might be a valuable hint to solve the problem, a good answer also demonstrates the solution. Please edit to provide example code to show what you mean. Alternatively, consider writing this as a comment instead. Jul 14 '17 at 9:10
3

Use Boost asynchronous input/output threads, sleep for x milliseconds;

#include <boost/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/asio.hpp>

boost::thread::sleep(boost::get_system_time() + boost::posix_time::millisec(1000));
1
  • 2
    What will actually happen if you try to sleep for 3 milliseconds? Will it be 15-16 milliseconds instead? Have you measured it? Oct 6 '17 at 17:54
0

As a Win32 replacement for POSIX systems:

void Sleep(unsigned int milliseconds) {
    usleep(milliseconds * 1000);
}

while (1) {
    printf(".");
    Sleep((unsigned int)(1000.0f/20.0f)); // 20 fps
}
1
  • Prefer nanosleep() to usleep(): the latter is deprecated and has been deleted from the most recent POSIX standard. Jul 14 '17 at 9:13
0

The question is old, but I managed to figure out a simple way to have this in my app. You can create a C/C++ macro as shown below use it:

#ifndef MACROS_H
#define MACROS_H

#include <unistd.h>

#define msleep(X) usleep(X * 1000)

#endif // MACROS_H
1
  • You probably meant usleep((X) * 1000) - which is one reason why functions are so much better than macros! Jan 15 at 12:45
0

For a short solution use

#include <thread>

using namespace std;
using namespace std::this_thread;

void f() {
    sleep_for(200ms);
}
-4

for C use /// in gcc.

#include <windows.h>

then use Sleep(); /// Sleep() with capital S. not sleep() with s .

//Sleep(1000) is 1 sec /// maybe.

clang supports sleep(), sleep(1) is for 1 sec time delay/wait.

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